Aug 18, 2022  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Communication Studies

  
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    COMM 290 - Beginning Videography

    (3 credits)
    This course is a study of the styles and techniques of video production. Students work with the different elements of video production such as camera, sound, editing and script. Offered once a year.

  
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    COMM 291 - Video Editing

    (3 credits)
    This course teaches video editing, focusing on postproduction skills and techniques, specifically how to shoot video with attention to the process, rhythm and continuity, target audience and how to input meaning through production codes. Students will learn to edit on analogue and digital systems, to cut existing video, and to organize video they have shot according to a variety of editing styles.

  
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    COMM 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    COMM 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    COMM 300 - Media and Multiculturalism

    (3 credits)
    This course explores the network of relationships between media processes (e.g., production, consumption, representation) and a range of multicultural identities (e.g., race, class, gender), paying particular attention to the role of power and privilege in shaping human conditions. Offered once a year.

  
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    COMM 303 - Introduction to Organizational Communication

    (3 credits)
    This course includes the analysis of communication problems in modern complex organizations, theory and practice. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMM 305 - Advanced Forensics Laboratory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 110 or consent of instructor
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    After advanced individual work in speech composition and delivery, the student will be required to prepare a variety of speech types for intercollegiate competition in this course. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMM 310 - Film History

    (3 credits)
    This survey course explores the history of cinema through a range of lenses (e.g., aesthetic, technological, economic and social film history). Regular screenings supplement lecture, group discussion and regular written assignments. Offered once yearly.

  
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    COMM 311 - Media Literacy

    (3 credits)
    This course offers both a cultural contextualization of mass-, computer-, and electronically-mediated communication and the tools by which students can access, analyze, evaluate, use and create media forms and content. An emphasis is placed on fostering the critical analysis and interpretation skills that contribute to the development of well-informed, independent-thinking citizens.

  
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    COMM 312 - Strategic Writing

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 226
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course will offer the student writing experience in various forms of public relations including writing assignments that would be typical in both nonprofit and business organizations. Included in this course are press releases, brochures, newsletters, feature stories and speeches. The computer is the essential technology for this course. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 313 - Media Law and Ethics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 229
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course will introduce students to the study of legal and ethical issues in the media industry and organizations. Students will be exposed to the applications of these issues and the ability to analyze the important legal and ethical aspects involved with the mass media network and the industry. Philosophical theories that deal with morals and ethics will be explored.

  
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    COMM 325 - Broadcast News Writing

    (3 credits)
    This course offers instruction in the writing of news and public affairs copy for radio and television. News gathering and writing assignments will be given weekly.

  
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    COMM 330 - Business and Professional Communication

    (3 credits)
    This course increases the students’ levels of competence in negotiating, interviewing, evaluating, leading and presentational skills. This course stresses abilities needed to attain cooperation and exert influence in corporate and public sector work environments. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 334 - Film, Video and Media Studies Theory and Research

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 224; and COMM 225 or COMM 229 or COMM 240
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course explores media theory and research both analytically and empirically through readings, screenings, class discussion and a range of graded assignments, including original research. In addition to an overview of various theoretical paradigms and research strategies, students also read works of scholars that put these ideas into practice. This strategy allows students to engage the literature not just as critical readers, but also as critical writers.

  
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    COMM 335 - News and Politics

    (3 credits)
    In this course, students will develop an understanding of political, social and cultural events as they affect print and electronic journalism. Offered once a year.

  
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    COMM 336 - Communication and Culture Theory and Research

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 224 and COMM 228
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    Students examine the foundations of communication criticism, explore current methods of communication analysis, and apply these methods in the analysis of a variety of cultural discourses, practices and texts.

  
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    COMM 337 - Strategic Communication Theory and Research

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 224 and COMM 226
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course examines strategic communication theory and research. Students will explore some of the academic research literature that reflects and guides theory development in the field. Students will also gain insight into the quantitative and qualitative methods of applied, basic and evaluative research used in developing and managing strategic communication programs.

  
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    COMM 341 - Public Relations Case Studies

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 226
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course addresses crucial dimensions of strategic planning and implementation of public relation programs and campaigns. Focus will be on managerial decision-making roles, strategies of communication selected, and the evaluation of the PR campaigns. Cases will be from business, government and the non-profit sector. Offered every other semester.

  
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    COMM 342 - Visual Culture and Communication

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 221
    This course explores the practices and experiences of visual communication in everyday life, focusing on a variety of different forms (such as photographs, graphic design, and art). In particular, this course examines the ways in which visual communication creates and communicates identity, as well a how people use visual communication to relate to and understand the world around them. Students will gain an appreciation for the variety of ways we communicate visually as well as the cultural history of these forms of communication. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 350 - Documentary Film

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 225 or ENGL 270
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    The course will examine the varying ways in which documentary film can illuminate the human condition or explore critical cultural issues facing society. Students will view several different styles of documentary and analyze the effectiveness of filmmakers’ techniques and choices. Films studied may include works by Flaherty, Grierson, Lorentz, Riefenstahl and Wiseman.

  
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    COMM 353 - Corporate Communications and Social Responsibility

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 226 or COMM 303
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course introduces students to the study of the ethics in decision-making concerning various communication practices within public relations and organizational communication. It introduces questions about the ethics and values of human communication in terms of the outcomes for the individual, the organization and greater society.

  
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    COMM 355 - Images of Gender in Media

    (3 credits)
    This course considers images of men and women in contemporary media forms, including film, television and magazines. Students will learn to think about media images as products of social values and as consumer commodities, analyzing how gender is socially constructed via body type, social roles, subcultures and consumer values, among other things. Students will also consider how images affect the way we construct ourselves and our lives.

  
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    COMM 356 - International Study in Communication

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Application through the International Programs Office
    This short-term international study course offers students first-hand exposure and interaction with foreign culture, customs and patterns of communication. Each faculty-led course includes pre-departure orientation sessions, lessons and activities at an international destination. Instruction will be in English. Course destinations and topics will vary. Contact the Department of Communication Studies or the International Programs Office for current study course details. Students may enroll more than once for different destinations and topics.

  
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    COMM 357 - Meaning and Consumption

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: At least two COMM courses at the 200-level or higher
    This course will allow students to explore issues of consumption as a meaningful and communicatively rich practice as it relates to identity, cultural values, politics and markets. A variety of topics are covered including identity and consumption, global and local processes of consumption, taste, class, conspicuous consumption and consumer activism. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 359 - Strategic Communication for Non-Profits

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 226
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course covers concepts and skills that help students use communication in a strategic way as it relates to non-profit sectors. Students learn how to build community commitment to non-profit organizations’ missions, strategic initiatives and fund raising activities. Students will become familiar with a variety of strategic communication techniques and outlets, and propose a strategic communication plan for an organization of their choice. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 360 - Argumentation and Advocacy

    (3 credits)
    The theory and practice of argument in various fields, including debate, public address and interpersonal communication, will be explored in this course.

  
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    COMM 361 - Gender Communication

    (3 credits)
    This course investigates gender communication and its impact on the development of our gender identities as well as on the choices we make as communicators in our personal and public communications settings. An exploration of the concept of genderlect will be provided by reviewing its theoretical under-pinnings, research and the practical applications which can be used to enhance communication effectiveness between genders.

  
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    COMM 362 - American Public Discourse

    (3 credits)
    This course introduces students to how American public discourse has shaped the development of the United States. Students obtain a broad knowledge of how different speakers and speeches have shaped various issues, movements and controversies within American history.

  
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    COMM 364 - Political Communication

    (3 credits) Cross Listed with POLI 364
    Prerequisite: Restricted to juniors or above or consent of the instructor
    This course is a survey of the role and functions of communication within politics, paying particular attention to political campaigns. Students gain a broad knowledge of how political communication shapes expectations and interpretations of current events, issues, political actors, and the political process.

  
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    COMM 365 - Introduction to Intercultural Communication

    (3 credits)
    Introduction to Intercultural Communication is a course designed to acquaint students with the factors which affect interpersonal relationships among people of differing cultural backgrounds. Foreign as well as native-born persons are encouraged to take the course. Course objectives are to enable students to become more sensitive to and tolerant of values and ideas expressed by others. Offered spring semester. (CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    COMM 366 - Advanced Audio Production

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 214
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course is an advanced examination of creating, writing, and producing audio materials for radio programming, television and film production, and for podcast and Webcast. It also includes an in-depth analysis of the medium, including commercials, news, features, documentaries and special programs.

  
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    COMM 370 - Screenwriting

    (3 credits)
    This course introduces students to the theory, craft and the business of film writing. Using a mixture of screenwriting texts, video and Internet assignments, and individual and group activities, students will become familiar with key screenwriting concepts such as character development and three-act structure. No prior screenwriting experience is required, but a desire to think creatively and learn a craft through writing and revision is a must. Offered every other year.

  
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    COMM 371 - Global Cinema

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 225 or ENGL 270
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course surveys the breadth of cinema around the globe, investigating a range of international films, movements and traditions.

  
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    COMM 373 - Strategic Visual Communication

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 226
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    Students will gain insight into how visual components contribute to effective strategic communication by investigating the roles visuals play in reaching audiences and building corporate identity. Through course readings, case studies, and assignments, students will learn about the communication functions served by visual components like images, color choices, and graphic design. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 390 - Television Direction (Documentary)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 215
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course will work with elements of television direction including script writing, storyboard, composition, framing, lighting, camera movement, music audio and sound effects, working with talent, format and genres of documentary video. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMM 391 - Public Relations Practicum

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 226 and COMM 312
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to solidify the knowledge and skills learned in their major through supervised experience in a non-profit public relations setting. Using a 120-hour required field experience as a focal point, students will utilize strategic research, thinking, writing and speaking skills. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 392 - Public Relations Campaigns

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 312; and COMM 337 or COMM 341
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This advanced course incorporates progressive public relations theory with practice. Students research, develop and implement a strategic “real-life” campaign for a community-based client, serving as consultants, and by developing portfolio-worthy deliverables that bring value to the client’s communication plan. The service-learning course includes guidance to learn necessary content and skills in such topics as fundraising, creative messaging and efficient integrated communication strategies.

  
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    COMM 397 - Cyber Culture and Digital Media

    (3 credits)
    This course examines the Internet and related digital and new-media technologies as communication within a range of economic, political and cultural contexts. The core of this investigation focuses on the ways in which digital media offer innovative channels for humans to share messages and make meaning, with emphasis on the interrelated issues of access (digital divide) and the increasingly global nature of digital communication (globalization). Through a variety of online and in-class individual and group exercises, students will learn and use basic Internet and new-media skills, and develop critical-thinking skills while exploring new-media environments.

  
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    COMM 399 - Topical Studies

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Dependent on topic
    Variable contemporary topics in communication will be discussed in this course. This course may be repeated for different topics. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 401 - Film Theory and Criticism

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 225 or ENGL 270 or consent of instructor
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course develops an advanced understanding of film as a complex cultural medium through the discussion of key theoretical and critical approaches. Theoretical and critical approaches discussed may include the following: realist theory, genre criticism, auteur theory, structuralism, feminist theory and journalistic criticism. The course combines weekly feature-length viewings with lectures, group discussions and written assignments.

  
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    COMM 415 - Advanced Television Production (Features)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 290 or COMM 291
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course will give students television production experience. Topics will include scripting, budgeting, pre- and post-production protocols, copyright and legal issues, studio and field production considerations, aesthetic issues and editing. The course will culminate in a 25-30 minute television project produced and directed by the student for his/her portfolio. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMM 430 - Topics in Film

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 225 or ENGL 270 or consent of instructor
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course offers the basics of film study and analysis in dominant and avant garde cinema. It exposes students to a diverse range of subject matter to provide a familiarity with aspects of a particular film style, movement, culture, media and/or film technology. Topics include, but are not limited to, various international directors, postmodernism, Francophone, Soviet, Swedish and Scandinavian, satire and parody, film noir and other genres and auteur. The course may be repeated for different topics.

  
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    COMM 463 - Popular Culture and Communication

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 226 or COMM 228 or COMM 229
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course explores the origins and development of popular culture in the mid-twentieth and early twenty-first century, examining a range of theoretical approaches to understanding, analyzing and participating in popular culture. The course primarily takes up television, film, advertising, popular music, and computer cyberculture, investigating how ethnicity, race, gender, class, age, religion, and sexuality both shape and are shaped by popular culture. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students
    One-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 492 - Seminar in Strategic Communication

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 102 or COMM 250; and COMM 224 and COMM 226 and COMM 337
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This seminar will pursue, in depth, selected themes and topics in the area of strategic communication. (CWRM)

  
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    COMM 493 - Seminar in Communication and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 102 or COMM 250; and COMM 224 and COMM 228 and COMM 336
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This seminar will pursue, in depth, selected themes and topics in the area of communication and culture. (CWRM)

  
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    COMM 495 - Communication Studies Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 102 or COMM 250; and COMM 221 or COMM 226 or COMM 228 or COMM 229; and COMM 224; and COMM 334 or COMM 336 or COMM 337
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This seminar will pursue, in depth, certain themes and topics in the area of the communication studies. Offered either semester. (CWRM)

  
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    COMM 496 - Seminar in Film, Video, and Media Studies

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 102 or COMM 250; and COMM 224; and COMM 225 or COMM 229 or COMM 240; and COMM 334
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This seminar will pursue, in depth, selected themes and topics in the area of film, video, and media studies. Offered either semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit. (CWRM)

  
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    COMM 498 - Internship in Communication

    (3-12 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department, formal application required
    This non-classroom experience is designed for a limited number of junior and senior majors to complement their academic preparation. Limited to 3-12 credits unless special circumstances at the work site require more involvement. Only three credits may be applied to the major elective requirement. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 499 - Directed Study in Communication

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department, formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.


Computer Science

  
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    COMP 105 - Computers and Their Applications: An Introduction

    (3 credits)
    The goal of this course is to provide a student with no previous computer experience the opportunity to become computer literate. The course consists of equal parts of textbook/lecture learning and hands-on experience with software such as an operating system, a spreadsheet, a word processor, presentation graphics and Internet services including electronic mail. The course is especially recommended for the new PC user but does not fulfill any requirements of the computer science major.

  
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    COMP 111 - Elementary Visual Programming

    (3 credits)
    This course provides an introduction to computer programming for non-computer science majors who have no previous programming experience. Topics include simple data types, control structure, and introduction to array and string data structure and algorithms, history of computer science, computer systems and environments. The course emphasizes object-oriented design and programming using the Alice programming system. Using Alice, students will write programs that produce 3-D computer animations. (CLOR)

  
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    COMP 135 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in computer science allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMP 136 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in computer science allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMP 143 - Introduction to Computer Science: Peer Assisted Learning

    (1 credit)
    Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with COMP 151
    Under faculty supervision, students acquire strategies of problem solving, and particularly programming skills to help them succeed in computer science. Students in this course will attend a weekly tutorial session led by a peer learning assistant (PAL), in which they will engage in inquiry-based and small-group problem solving. This course will be graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
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    COMP 151 - Computer Science I

    (3 credits)
    Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with COMP 143
    This is a beginning course in programming, which introduces concepts of computer organization. Problem-solving methods and algorithmic development stressing good programming style and documentation including top down and modular design will be covered. This course emphasizes problem solving with programming exercises run on the computer. Offered either semester. (Formerly COMP 101)

  
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    COMP 152 - Computer Science II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 151
    This course continues the coverage of the fundamental concepts of computer programming techniques including recursion, sorting, searching, subprograms and aggregate data types. Software engineering principles including program design, programming style and documentation started in COMP 151 will be continued. Students will write programming projects to demonstrate their mastery of these concepts. Offered either semester. (Formerly COMP 102)

  
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    COMP 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    COMP 202 - Transitions in Programming

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: COMP 152
    In this course students will learn and practice the skills needed in upper level computer science classes. Very often the language used for introductory computer science classes is not the same as that used in more advanced courses. Some languages hide programming details that others expose. This course will be offered in whatever languages the department deems to be currently appropriate for upper level computer science courses.  This course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits for different programming languages.

  
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    COMP 203 - Programming and Computer Algebra

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 161/161E or MATH 141; each of which may be taken concurrently
    In this course, students will solve problems by writing computer programs that include input, output and control structures (sequence, selection, repetition). In addition, the student will learn and use some of the tools of a computer algebra system and do programming in the system. Note: A mathematics or computer science major who has successfully completed COMP 151 may not take this course for credit.

  
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    COMP 206 - Introduction to Computer Organization

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 152
    In this course, the organization and structure of major hardware components of computers; mechanics of information transfer and control within a digital computer system, and the fundamentals of logic design will be covered. The major emphasis of the course concerns the functions of and communication between the large scale components of a computer system, including properties of I/0 devices, controllers and interrupts. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMP 220 - Topics in Programming Languages

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 152 or equivalent
    This course provides an introduction to different programming languages such as Java and Smalltalk. It is intended as a course for students who have previously programmed but want to explore different programming languages. It does not count as a departmental elective for computer science majors. This course may be repeated for credit with different language topics.

  
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    COMP 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in computer science allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMP 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in computer science allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMP 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking- intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    COMP 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS )

  
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    COMP 320 - Unix/Linux Systems Administration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 206
    This course covers basic skills needed to administer a Unix/Linux system including file organization, backup, recovery, account maintenance, network design, administration, device control, security and system monitoring. Also this course covers how to write shell scripts to perform basic system administration tasks. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMP 330 - Data Structures and Algorithms

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 152
    In this course, static, semistatic and dynamic data structures and techniques for the analysis and design of efficient algorithms which act on data structures will be addressed. Course topics will include arrays, records, stacks, queues, deques, linked lists, trees, graphs, sorting and searching algorithms, algorithms for insertion and deletion and the analysis and comparison of algorithms.

  
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    COMP 340 - Organization of Programming Languages

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher; and MATH 130
    This course provides an introduction to the concepts found in a variety of programming languages, programming languages as tools for problem solving, and a brief introduction to languages from a number of different paradigms. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMP 345 - Compiler Construction

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher; and COMP 340
    This course includes compiler structure; lexiysis, syntax analysis, grammars, description of programming language, automatically constructed recognizers, and error recovery; semantic analysis, semantic languages, semantic processes, optimization techniques and extendible compilers. Students will write a sample compiler in this course.

  
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    COMP 350 - Operating Systems

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 206; and COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher
    Discussion of the organization and structure of operating systems for various modes of computer use from simple batch systems to time-sharing/multiprocessing systems are covered in this course. Topics include concurrent processing, memory management, deadlock, file systems, scheduling, etc. Programming assignments made in a high-level language with concurrent processing feature are required. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMP 399 - Topics in Computer Science

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher; and other prerequisites dependent on topic
    Topics of special and current interest not covered in other courses will be offered. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
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    COMP 405 - Introduction to Database Systems

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher; and MATH 130
    This course includes physical data organization; the hierarchical, network and relational data models; design theory for relational database, data dependencies, normal forms and preventing loss of information; query optimization; and integrity and security of databases. Students will implement applications on a relational database system. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMP 410 - Database Applications

    (3 credits)
    In this course, the role of a database in an MIS environment is studied. Team analysis and implementation of a database project will be a major course component. This course does not fulfill computer science major requirements. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMP 419 - Web Information Retrieval

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330
    This course studies the theory, design and implementation of text-based information systems. The information retrieval core components of the course include efficient text indexing, representation of information needs, several important retrieval models (vector space, probabilistic, inference net, link analysis), web search including crawling, collaborative filtering recommender systems, and experimental evaluation. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMP 426 - 2D Game Design

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher
    In this course we will look at the whole life cycle of game development. We will focus on 2D games, avoiding some of the implementation details that hinder the development of 3D games. Students will begin with sketching out ideas, implement 2D graphics-based games. Students will experiment with 2D game concepts like scrolling, tiled maps and creating the illusion of infinite space. We will look at game Artificial Intelligence including pathing and goal selection. Students will also explore issues of art selection for games, including copyright issues and intellectual property.

  
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    COMP 430 - Computer Networks

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher
    This course includes an introduction to data transmission, digital multiplexing and data switching, characteristics of transmission media, terminals, modems and communication processes; design of error control, line control, and information flow control procedures; study of message and packet switching networks; protocols and software in packet switching systems; and modeling techniques for networks. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMP 435 - Analysis of Algorithms

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher
    This course is a general overview of algorithms, including algorithmic techniques needed in problem solving, and relative efficiency of algorithms. Topics will include efficient algorithms for data manipulation, graphical analysis, rapid evaluation of algebraic functions and matrix operations, and NlogN bound in sorting algorithms. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMP 436 - Computer Graphics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher; and MATH 120 or MATH 202
    This course includes an introduction to hardware, algorithms and software of computer graphics. Topics include line generators, affine transformations, line and polygon clipping, splines, interactive techniques, menus, orthographic and perspective projections, solid modeling, hidden surface removal, lighting models and shading. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMP 437 - Simulation and Game Design

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 436
    This course introduces techniques used to design and implement computer games. Topics include a historic overview of computer games, the preparation of game documents and the use of a game engine, modeling software and terrain generator. A game will be designed and implemented in a team environment.

  
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    COMP 442 - Object-Oriented Software Engineering

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher
    This is a project course in the development of a large-scale software system using OO methodologies. The primary process involves discovering classes and objects that model both the application domain and the solution space, identifying the semantics of these classes and objects and establishing relationships among them, and implementing the classes and objects using appropriate data structures and algorithms. This primary process is controlled by a well-defined development framework with the following steps: 1) establishing core requirements, 2) providing a model of the system’s behavior, 3) creating an architecture for the implementation, 4) evolving the implementation through successive iterations, and 5) maintaining the system. May be taken for graduate-level credit. (CWRM)

  
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    COMP 460 - Introduction to Robotics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 330, completed with a grade of “C-” or higher
    This course is an introduction to the theory of the motion of robot manipulators. The mathematics, programming and control of manipulators will be emphasized. Issues of sensing and planning will also be examined. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMP 470 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Restricted to computer science majors and completion of 29 credits of computer science courses in the major
    This course introduces students to the basic concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence. Emphasis is given to representation and the associated data structures. Students will also be introduced to an AI language such as LISP. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMP 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students
    One-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMP 490 - Senior Design and Development

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMP 442; restricted to computer science majors with senior standing
    This course provides the capstone experience for computer science majors. It pulls together the fundamental elements of the discipline and illustrates how these elements work together in practice. This course also exposes students to some cutting edge aspects of computer science. It requires students to think and write critically about the effects that our discipline can have on individuals and society. Students will design and implement a large team programming project. Offered annually.

  
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    COMP 498 - Internship in Computer Science

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: A minimum of 24 approved hours in computer science and consent of the department; formal application required
    In this course, students will work for an employer in the computer science field for a minimum of 10 hours/week during one full semester. A member of the department will serve as advisor and evaluator of all work projects. This course can be taken only once for credit. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
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    COMP 499 - Directed Study in Computer Science

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    COMP 502 - Research

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Original research is undertaken by the graduate student in their field. This course culminates in a capstone project. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog.

  
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    COMP 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    COMP 510 - Topics in Programming Languages

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    This course investigates programming language development from designer’s, user’s and implementer’s point of view. Topics include formal syntax and semantics, language system, extensible languages and control structures. There is also a survey of intralanguage features, covering ALGOL-60, ALGOL-68, Ada, Pascal, LISP, SNOBOL-4 APL, SIMULA-67, CLU, MODULA, and others.

  
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    COMP 520 - Operating Systems Principles

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    This course examines design principles such as optimal scheduling; file systems, system integrity and security, as well as the mathematical analysis of selected aspects of operating system design. Topics include queuing theory, disk scheduling, storage management and the working set model. Design and implementation of an operating system nucleus is also studied.

  
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    COMP 525 - Design and Construction of Compilers

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    In this course, topics will include lexical and syntactic analysis; code generation; error detection and correction; optimization techniques; models of code generators; and incremental and interactive compiling. Students will design and implement a compiler.

  
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    COMP 530 - Software Engineering

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    Topics in this course will include construction of reliable software, software tools, software testing methodologies, structured design, structured programming, software characteristics and quality and formal proofs of program correctness. Chief programmer teams and structure walk-throughs will be employed.

  
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    COMP 540 - Automata, Computability and Formal Languages

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    Topics in this course will include finite automata and regular languages, context- free languages, Turing machines and their variants, partial recursive functions and grammars, Church’s thesis, undecidable problems, complexity of algorithms and completeness.

  
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    COMP 545 - Analysis of Algorithms

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    This course deals with techniques in the analysis of algorithms. Topics to be chosen from among the following: dynamic programming, search and traverse techniques, backtracking, numerical techniques, NP-hard and NP-complete problems, approximation algorithms and other topics in the analysis and design of algorithms.

  
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    COMP 565 - Logic Programming

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to first order predicate logic as a problem-solving tool. Logic programming languages such as PROLOG are studied along with applications of logic programming to mathematics fields, natural language processing and law.

  
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    COMP 570 - Robotics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    This is a project-oriented course in robotics. Topics are chosen from manipulator motion and control, motion planning, legged-motion, vision, touch sensing, grasping, programming languages for robots and automated factory design.

  
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    COMP 580 - Database Systems

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    In this course, topics will include relational, hierarchical and network data models; design theory for relational databases and query optimization; classification of data models, data languages; concurrency, integrity, privacy; modeling and measurement of access strategies; and dedicated processors, information retrieval and real time applications.

  
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    COMP 590 - Computer Architecture

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to the internal structure of digital computers including design of gates, flip-fops, registers and memories to perform operations on numerical and other data represented in binary form; computer system analysis and design; organizational dependence on computations to be performed; and theoretical aspects of parallel and pipeline computation.

  
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    COMP 594 - Computer Networks

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    This course provides an introduction to fundamental concepts in computer networks, including their design and implementation. Topics include network architectures and protocols, placing emphasis on protocol used in the Internet; routing; data link layer issues; multimedia networking; network security; and network management.

 

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