Aug 18, 2022  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Biological Sciences: Other Approved Courses

  
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    BIOL 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discredtion of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in biology allow exceptionally able students to explore challenging topics in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered spring semester.


Cape Verdean Creole

  
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    LACV 101 - Elementary Cape Verdean Creole

    (3 credits)
    This course is an introduction to the lexical, grammatical, semantic and phonetic structures of the Cape Verdean Creole language, with a special emphasis on functional communication. The students are offered an initial introduction of the origins of the language, and everyday cultural concepts are discussed Note: See the “Departmental Foreign Language Policy” in the “Foreign Languages ”section of this catalog. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
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    LACV 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or an SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    LACV 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199, Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    LACV 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)


Chemical Sciences

  
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    CHEM 102 - Chemistry in Everyday Life

    (3 credits)
    This course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry and is designed for students majoring in any of the liberal arts programs. Topics include atomic structure and chemical bonding, ionic and molecular compounds, organic chemistry and the chemistry of drugs, acid-base chemistry, biomolecules and health, nuclear chemistry and medically important radioisotopes, air and water pollution, and alternative energy sources. This course is not recommended for science majors. Offered either semester. (CNSN)

  
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    CHEM 131 - Survey of Chemistry I

    (4 credits)
    The first of a two-semester sequence of courses designed for students requiring a yearlong course in chemistry, but who are not planning further study in chemistry. This course covers topics such as atomic structure, chemical bonding, states of matter solutions, chemical reactions (with an emphasis on acid/base reactions) and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. (CNSL)

  
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    CHEM 132 - Survey of Chemistry II

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 131 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course is the second of a two-semester course sequence, in which topics include structure, nomenclature and reactions of organic molecules, and the basics of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and DNA. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered spring semester. (CNSL)

  
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    CHEM 135 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in chemistry allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered fall semester.

  
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    CHEM 136 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in chemistry allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Offered spring semester.

  
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    CHEM 141 - Chemical Principles I

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 140/140E or higher, which may be taken concurrently. Restricted to majors in biology, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, math and physics, and to minors in biochemistry and chemistry.
    The first of a two-semester course sequence designed for students majoring in physical and biological sciences, this course will help students build a solid foundation in chemical facts and fundamental principles needed for intermediate and advanced courses in biology, chemistry, geological sciences and physics. Topics covered include properties of solids, liquids and gases, atomic and molecular structure, chemical nomenclature and bonding, stoichiometry, gas laws and aqueous solution chemistry. Laboratory work emphasizes physical and chemical measurements and quantitative analysis. Three hours of lecture, one hour of recitation, and three hours of laboratory weekly. Offered fall semester and summer session. (CNSL; CQUR)

  
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    CHEM 142 - Chemical Principles II

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 141 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    Theoretical inorganic chemistry will be studied with emphasis on mass-energy relationships in terms of structure and physical laws. Laboratory work emphasizes quantitative techniques. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory weekly. Offered spring semester and summer session. (CNSL; CQUR)

  
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    CHEM 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    CHEM 241 - Quantitative Chemical Analysis

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 142 with minimum grade of “C-“
    The classical and modern methods for the quantitative analysis of organic and inorganic compounds, including volumetric, gravimetric, spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Topics covered include acid-based, solubility and complex-formation equilibria, as well as an introduction to spectroscopy and chromatography. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered spring semester.

  
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    CHEM 242 - Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 142 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    The descriptive chemistry, as well as synthesis and reactions, of non-transitional elements and their compounds are studied systematically. Correlations of structure and properties are explained on the basis of modern theories. Offered fall semester.

  
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    CHEM 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in chemistry allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered fall semester.

  
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    CHEM 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in chemistry allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered spring semester.

  
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    CHEM 290 - Environmental Chemistry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 132 with a minimum grade of “C-” or CHEM 142 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    A one-semester course covering the basic principles of aquatic chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, and the chemistry of the geosphere. Topics include energy and the environment, water pollution, water treatment, air pollution, photochemical smog, global warming, the ozone hole and an introduction to “green” chemistry. Offered spring semester, odd years.

  
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    CHEM 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    CHEM 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    CHEM 343 - Organic Chemistry I

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 142 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    An introductory course in organic chemistry organized in terms of the structure and transformations of organic molecules. This course will focus specifically on chemical bonding, physical properties, nomenclature, isomerism, three dimensional structure, stereochemistry, substitution and elimination reaction mechanisms of organic molecules. The laboratory must be taken concurrently with CHEM 343 and includes an introduction to organic laboratory techniques for the preparation, purification and characterization of organic substances. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory weekly. Offered fall semester and summer session.

  
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    CHEM 344 - Organic Chemistry II

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 343 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course is a continuation of CHEM 343, with a focus on alcohols, ethers, aromaticity and delocalized bonding, spectroscopic structure identification, and the organic chemistry of biologically important molecules: aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, their derivatives, and amines. The laboratory must be taken concurrently with CHEM 344 and includes the preparation, purification and characterization of organic substances and identification of unknowns with a significant focus on spectroscopic structure elucidation. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory weekly. Offered spring semester and summer session.

  
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    CHEM 381 - Physical Chemistry I

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 142 with a minimum grade of “C-” and MATH 162 with a minimum grade of “C-“. MATH 142 with a minimum grade of “C-” may be substituted for MATH 162 with consent of instructor
    The laws governing the physical and chemical properties of substances. This course covers thermodynamics and kinetics. Three hours of lecture and one four-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered fall semester.

  
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    CHEM 382 - Physical Chemistry II

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 142 with a minimum grade of “C-” and MATH 162 with a minimum grade of “C-“. MATH 142 with a minimum grade of “C-” may be substituted for MATH 162 with consent of instructor
    The laws governing the physical and chemical properties of substances. This course focuses on molecular spectroscopy and quantum chemistry and statistical mechanics. Three hours of lecture and one four-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered spring semester.

  
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    CHEM 390 - Research Problems in Chemistry

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    The student will work on a research project under the direction of a faculty member. A written report (see department office for preparation guide) must be submitted to the department chairperson by the end of the final exam period. This course may be repeated for up to six credits. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
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    CHEM 444 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 344 with a minimum grade of “C-” and CHEM 382 with a minimum grade of “C-“. CHEM 382 may be taken concurrently.
    The topics of group theory, stereochemistry, ligand field theory, molecular orbital theory, synthesis and kinetics of reactions as applied to transition metal elements will be treated in detail. Hours arranged. Offered spring semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    CHEM 446 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 242 with a minimum grade of “C-“; or CHEM 444 with a minimum grade of “C-“. CHEM 444 may be taken concurrently
    Key concepts in inorganic chemistry are explored through the synthesis and characterizations of variety of inorganic compounds with an emphasis on organometallic and coordination complexes. Modern synthetic methods, including inert atmosphere techniques, will be used to prepare target compounds. The resulting compounds will be characterized and examined using a wide array of analytical and spectroscopic techniques such as IR, Raman, UV-Vis, fluorescence, electrochemistry and NMR. Offered spring semester.

  
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    CHEM 450 - Instrumental Analysis

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 344 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and CHEM 381 with a minimum grade of “C-“, which may be taken concurrently
    This course covers the theory and practical applications of instrumental methods as applied to chemical analysis, including atomic and molecular UV/Vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, Infrared spectroscopy, NMR and mass spectrometry, x-ray crystallography, and gas liquid chromatography. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered fall semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit. (CWRM)

  
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    CHEM 452 - General Biochemistry I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 344 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This lecture course provides a survey of the chemical components of living matter and the major processes of cellular metabolism. Offered fall semester.

  
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    CHEM 456 - General Biochemistry I Lab

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 452 with a minimum grade of “C-“, which may be taken concurrently
    This four hour laboratory course provides an introduction to methodology and instrumentation used to separate, identify and characterize proteins. Techniques include solution preparation, spectrophotometry, protein 3D structure visualization, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, chromatography, protein purification and enzymatic analysis. Offered fall semester.

  
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    CHEM 462 - General Biochemistry II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 452 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    A survey of the chemical components of living matter and the major processes of cellular metabolism. Three hours of lecture weekly. Offered spring semester.

  
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    CHEM 466 - Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 452 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    A study of special laboratory techniques used in biochemical research such as chromatography, enzymology, radiochemical techniques, electrophoresis and metabolic pathways. An individual project will complete the laboratory. One hour of laboratory discussion and three hours of laboratory weekly. Offered spring semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    CHEM 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students
    One-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
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    CHEM 486 - Advanced Environmental Chemistry Lab

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 290 with a minimum grade of “C-” or CHEM 489 with a minimum grade of “C-“; CHEM 489 may be taken concurrently
    This laboratory course will introduce students to basic and advanced techniques employed in environmental chemical analysis. The laboratory experiments are designed to emphasize sampling, sample processing techniques such as extraction and wet chemical methods, and modern instrumental techniques commonly employed in the analysis of air, water and soil/sediment samples. Students will also interpret chemical data and develop scientific writing skills. Offered spring semester, even years.

  
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    CHEM 489 - Advanced Environmental Chemistry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 344 with a minimum grade of “C-” and consent of instructor
    This course will deal with processes for minimizing and treating solid and hazardous waste, toxicological chemistry of inorganic and organic substances, and chemical analysis of waste, water, air and solids. In addition, recent advances in the field of environmental chemistry will be discussed. Offered spring semester, even years.

  
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    CHEM 490 - Special Topics in Chemistry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Special Topics in Chemistry will deal with various topics at the “cutting edge” of chemistry. The course will stress the current literature as the “text.” Assessment will be based primarily on writing assignments. The topic will change each time the course is offered. The specific topic will be announced prior to registration.

  
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    CHEM 496 - Senior Seminar in Chemistry I

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 381 or CHEM 382, which may be taken concurrently; and completion of the Spoken Communication (CSPK) core curriculum requirement; or consent of department chairperson
    This course is part of a two-semester capstone sequence for senior chemistry majors in oral/written scientific communication. Students will attend weekly public seminars to explore current topics in the chemical sciences that require the assimilation of knowledge from prior course work. Seminar topics will include talks by BSU research students, department faculty, and invited speakers from outside the chemistry department. With a focus on oral communication skills, this course will provide an introduction to the techniques and style of technical oral presentation generally accepted by professional chemists. Offered fall semester.

  
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    CHEM 497 - Senior Seminar in Chemistry II

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: CHEM 381 or CHEM 382 which may be taken concurrently; or consent of department chairperson
    This course is part of a two-semester capstone sequence for senior chemistry majors in oral/written scientific communication. Completion of both CHEM 496 and CHEM 497 is required for both the B.S. and B.A. degrees in Chemistry. Students will attend weekly public seminars to explore current topics in the chemical sciences that require the assimilation of knowledge from prior course work. Seminar topics will include talks by BSU research students, department faculty and invited speakers from outside the chemistry department. With a focus on oral communication skills, this course will provide an introduction to the techniques and style of technical writing generally accepted by professional chemists. Offered spring semester.

  
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    CHEM 498 - Internship in Chemical Sciences

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Laboratory experience in industrial or government laboratories, regulating agencies or academic laboratories at other institutions. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

  
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    CHEM 499 - Directed Study in Chemistry

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
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    CHEM 502 - Research

    (1-6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Original research is undertaken by the graduate student in his or her field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits.

  
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    CHEM 503 - Directed Study

    (1-6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    CHEM 560 - Special Topics in Chemistry

    (variable credit)
    The course will cover special topics of current relevance in chemistry education. The topic to be addressed will be announced prior to registration. This course may be taken more than once with the consent of the adviser.


Chinese

  
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    LACH 101 - Elementary Chinese I

    (3 credits)
    An introduction to elementary syntactic, semantic, phonetic and paralinguistic structures is offered. Pertinent everyday cultural concepts are discussed. Relevant comparison and contrast with the native language is treated. Functional communication in the second language in a controlled environment is the principal objective of the course. Note: See the “Departmental Foreign Language Policy” in the “Foreign Languages ”section of this catalog. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
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    LACH 102 - Elementary Chinese II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LACH 101; or see the “Departmental Foreign Language Policy” in the “Foreign Languages section of this catalog”
    The further study of elementary syntactic, semantic, phonetic and paralinguistic structures is offered. Pertinent everyday cultural concepts are discussed. Relevant comparison and contrast with the native language is treated. Functional communication in the second language in a controlled environment is the principal objective of the course. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
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    LACH 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    LACH 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    LACH 299 - Second Year Seminar(Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)


Communication Disorders

  
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    COMD 135 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia allows honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes; specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMD 136 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia allows honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes; specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMD 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    COMD 220 - Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders

    (3 credits)
    This course is an introduction to speech, language and hearing disorders in children and adults. Disorders of functional, structural and neurological etiologies will be discussed. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMD 231 - Sign Language I

    (3 credits)
    This course includes the history and development of manual communication and deaf culture in the United States. Focus will be placed on contact signing and American Sign Language through vocabulary development and beginning conversational skills. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMD 250 - Language Development in Young Children

    (3 credits)
    This course is an overview of the normal language acquisition and development process of children. Emphasis will be on the years birth through age five, risk factors and strategies to facilitate development. Theories of language development, rule systems of English, stages of language development, individual and cultural differences, as well as prevention of an identification of language problems will be discussed.

  
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    COMD 281 - Speech Anatomy and Physiology

    (3 credits)
    This is an introduction to the study of the anatomy and physiology of systems involved in speech, language and hearing, and their relationships to disorders of communication. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMD 282 - Speech and Hearing Science

    (3 credits)
    This is an introductory course as it relates to normal aspects of speech, hearing and language. Physiological elements of speech production, speech acoustics, auditory physiology and the psychophysics of sound reception are included in this course. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMD 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia allows honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes; specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMD 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia allows honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes; specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMD 290 - Language Acquisition and Development

    (3 credits)
    This course is an overview of the normal language acquisition and development process though the life span. Emphasis will be placed on children from birth though school age. Theories of language development, rule systems of English, stage of language development, individual and cultural differences, prevention of language problems, and techniques for collecting and analyzing a language sample will be addressed. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMD 294 - Phonetics

    (3 credits)
    Analysis and transcription of speech sound systems are included in this course. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMD 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    COMD 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    COMD 311 - Prevention of Speech, Language and Communication Disorders

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 290 or consent of instructor
    The overall objective of speech-language pathology is to optimize the individual’s ability to communicate in natural environments and thus improve their quality of life. The purpose of this course is to incorporate students’ knowledge from prerequisite courses, introduce additional content, develop clinical skills, and implement the content and skills in a practical situation. Students will meet for instruction and then go to area Head Start programs and implement prevention activities with children.

  
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    COMD 312 - Language Disorders in Children

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 220 and COMD 290
    Etiology, diagnosis, evaluation, cultural differences and treatment of language-impaired children will be covered in this course. Clinical case material will be discussed and analyzed. Diagnostic tools and evaluations methodology will be introduced. Basic theoretical constructs pertaining to the treatment of the language-impaired populations from birth through high school will also be included. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMD 313 - Phonology and Articulation Disorders

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 220 and COMD 281 or COMD 282; and COMD 294
    This course is a study of normal and abnormal phonology and articulation, including etiology, prevention, diagnosis, assessment, cultural differences and treatment of phonology and articulation disorders. Use of distinctive feature theory, phonological process analysis and traditional phonetic approaches will be covered. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMD 325 - Voice Disorders in Children and Adults

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 220 and COMD 281 and COMD 282
    This course is an introduction to etiology, diagnosis and remediation of voice disorders and associated pathological conditions. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMD 350 - Language Disorders in Young Children

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 250
    This course will focus on language disorders in children at birth through age five. The early intervention process, at-risk and established risk factors, syndromes, assessment, intervention and collaboration with other professionals will be addressed.

  
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    COMD 351 - Introduction to Audiology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 281 and COMD 282
    This course is an introduction to the science of hearing including transmission and measurement of sound to the human ear; anatomy, physiology and neurology of hearing mechanisms; related pathological conditions; screening and measurement of hearing; and audiogram interpretation. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMD 355 - Study Tour: Multicultural Perspectives in Special Education and Communication Disorders

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 290 and SPED 203; or consent of department chairperson
    This course is a faculty-led study tour to investigate how individuals with special needs and/or communication disorders are treated educationally and socially in cultures outside of the United States. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    COMD 381 - Neurological Bases of Speech and Language

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 220 and COMD 281 and COMD 282 and COMD 290
    This course will present an overview of the neurological, anatomical and physiological bases of speech and language in order to more fully understand the disorders’ processes. The neurological effects of stroke, traumatic brain injury, and degenerative neurological disease and the concomitant effects on speech and language will be discussed.

  
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    COMD 391 - Understanding Language and Linguistics within the Clinical Process

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 220 and COMD 281 and COMD 282 and COMD 290
    This course is designed to provide communication disorders students who already have an understanding of the normal language acquisition process with an overview of the field of linguistics. The universal properties and systematic aspects of languages will be explored. The students will develop their meta-linguistic awareness through discussion of language variation, attitudes about language, language contact and diversity, language change, and visual languages. Application of this information to the speech-language pathologist’s role in the language acquisition process and in clinical treatment of language disorders and language differences will be addressed. Offered summer session.

  
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    COMD 393 - Aural Rehabilitation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 351
    Habilitation and rehabilitation for the hard of hearing including assessment and therapy procedures related to auditory training, speech reading, language therapy and hearing aid training will be covered in this course. Educational management and counseling strategies will also be addressed. Offered fall semester.

  
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    COMD 399 - Topical Studies

    (3 credits)
    Variable contemporary topics in communication disorders will be covered in this course. This course may be repeated for different topics. Offered spring semester.

  
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    COMD 451 - Clinical Strategies in Communication

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 312 and COMD 313 and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 and a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the major and consent of the instructor
    The objective of this course is to introduce the student to intervention strategies and skills used in assessment of children and adults with communication disorders. It will be taken in the fall semester of the senior year by all students who elect the practicum track. Offered fall semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMD 452 - Speech-Language Therapy Techniques

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: COMD 312 and COMD 313 and COMD 351 and COMD 480
    This course is designed to familiarize students with the process of intervention. Basic principles of therapy will be discussed and specific techniques used in the treatment of a variety of communication disorders will be introduced. Areas addressed include speech therapy programming, the effects of culture on clinical interactions, behavior modification, session design, data collection, documentation, accountability and use of the supervisory process. This course is recommended for students who have not elected the practicum track.

  
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    COMD 480 - Clinical Procedures: An Overview

    (3 credits)
    In this course, professional behavior, responsibilities and ethics will be presented followed by an introduction to the clinical process. The need for consideration of cultural diversity and treatment throughout the lifespan will be emphasized. Through completion of 25 observation hours, the students will have the opportunity to demonstrate integration of concepts presented throughout the communication disorders curriculum. Offered either semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    COMD 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    In this course, one-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    COMD 490 - Clinical Practicum: Speech Pathology

    (3 or 6 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 312 and COMD 313 and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in communication disorders courses, and consent of the instructor
    This course is a clinical experience in speech pathology. Clinical hours can be credited towards A.S.H.A. hours. Activities will be determined by student need, experience and academic preparation. Initially the student will register for three credits to be taken concurrently with COMD 451. May be repeated once for a total of six or nine credits.

  
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    COMD 498 - Internship in Communication Disorders

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMD 290; consent of communication disorders faculty; formal application required
    This course provides off-campus experiences in areas related to expanding the student’s background in communication disorders. Experiences include but not limited to: audiology clinics and educational programs for children with autism, children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, or children or older individuals with other special needs with a focus on speech, language, communication and prevention. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    COMD 499 - Directed Study in Communication Disorders

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMD 502 - Research

    (1-6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Original research is undertaken by the graduate student in his or her field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits.

  
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    COMD 503 - Directed Study

    (1-6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    COMD 559 - Study Tour: Multicultural Perspectives in Special Education and Communication Disorders

    (3 credits) Cross Listed with SPED 559
    Prerequisite: Dependent on itinerary
    This is a faculty led study tour to investigate how individuals with special needs and/or communication disorders are treated educationally and socially in cultures outside the United States. This course may be repeated for different itineraries.


Communication Studies

  
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    COMM 102 - Introduction to Public Speaking

    (3 credits)
    This course is an introduction to the practical skill of public speaking. It will emphasize the basic principles of research, organization, and delivery in the construction of effective public presentations. Civic aspects of public speaking will also be addressed with attention to critical listening and evaluation of public communication. (CSPK)

  
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    COMM 110 - Forensics Practicum

    (1 credit)
    Credit is given for 60 or more hours of intercollegiate debate and competitive speaking at intercollegiate tournaments. A maximum of three credit hours can be used toward a major or minor in Communication Studies. This course may be repeated. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    COMM 214 - Radio Production

    (3 credits)
    Audio theory, programming and production, station management, and relation of radio to record industry, as well as working as a member of a production team in writing, producing and editing on-air production are included in this course.

  
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    COMM 215 - Television Studio Production (Television Production I)

    (3 credits)
    Students will learn the equipment, direct live or live on tape, edit, cue audio and video in this course. Team production of news and talk shows are also included.

  
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    COMM 224 - Communication Research and Writing

    (3 credits)
    This course provides an introduction to communication research and writing. Students learn about different components of academic research and practice these skills through academic writing assignments, including the production of a literature review.

  
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    COMM 225 - Film as Communication

    (3 credits)
    This course is a survey of the development of the motion picture as a medium of communication, with an emphasis on films and practices of the popular American cinema. The course introduces students to ways in which to understand and analyze film as a form of communication. The course instructs students to analyze mise en scène elements (e.g., script construction, staging, lighting, sound and music, framing, editing techniques, special effects and the impact of digital technologies) and how these impact narrative framing, and viewer understandings and responses.

  
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    COMM 226 - Introduction to Public Relations

    (3 credits)
    This course provides the student with a knowledge of the history, goals, objectives and skills associated with public relations. It offers students an opportunity to utilize acquired communication skills in a specific career area as well as giving students the opportunity to acquire writing, reasoning, listening, speaking and other skills required in public relations work. Case study analysis and hands-on applications are primary teaching/learning methodologies. Offered either semester. (Formerly COMM 301)

  
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    COMM 227 - Multimedia Applications for Public Relations

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: COMM 226
    Beginning Fall 2016, a minimum grade of “C” will be required for all prerequisite COMM courses.

    This course is designed to introduce students to publishing software important in public relations work. Focus includes page layout, text and image, and final printed output. Students write copy for and produce brochures, newsletters and specialty publications.

  
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    COMM 228 - Introduction to Communication and Culture

    (3 credits)
    This foundation course examines the productive relationship between communication and culture. It introduces students to the everyday intersections of social relations, cultural practices, and the construction of meaning. Attention is paid to the relationships between communication, culture, ideology, social order, and identity.

  
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    COMM 229 - Foundations of Media Studies

    (3 credits)
    The primary objective of this course is to foster a broad understanding of the field, hone critical skills and increase understanding of the theoretical and philosophical discussions taking place in media studies. The course considers questions such as the interrelationships between production and consumption, the notion of what constitutes a “text,” and the ways in which social power shapes how we understand and experience media.

  
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    COMM 239 - Multimedia Storytelling

    (3 credits)
    This course explores creative and critical thinking about storytelling and narrative across a range of media platforms. After considering the ways in which media industries are continually strategizing how narrative (from news stories to film franchises) might work simultaneously via numerous mediated channels of communication, the primary focus will be on crafting student stories via audio, video, and web-based media.

  
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    COMM 240 - Introduction to Journalism

    (3 credits)
    Introduction to Journalism is designed to acquaint students with news decision-making newsroom operations, reporting, writing, editing and Associated Press style guidelines. The course is laboratory-based and has substantial reporting, writing and editing assignments.

  
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    COMM 250 - Public Speaking

    (3 credits)
    This course introduces students to the study, evaluation and practice of public presentation. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills as students gain competence in public speaking in a variety of contexts. Offered either semester. (CSPK)

  
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    COMM 260 - Group Communication and Decision Making

    (3 credits)
    This course extends theoretical knowledge of small-group behavior. Stress will be placed on implementation of theories in such areas as leadership, roles of group members, conflict management, reasoning, argument and problem solving. Offered either semester. (CSPI)

  
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    COMM 270 - Interpersonal Communication

    (3 credits)
    Students study communication between people who have ongoing and meaningful relationships. The course examines the skills, concepts, theories and values associated with the development and maintenance of such relationships. An emphasis is placed on the influence of such variables as gender and culture. Offered either semester.

  
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    COMM 288 - Communication Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    This course offers an introduction to a communication studies topic. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course is repeatable for different topics up to three credits.

 

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