Aug 18, 2022  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Computer Science

  
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    COMP 596 - Topics in Computer Science

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MS program in Computer Science or consent of instructor
    In this course, topics are chosen from program verification, formal semantics, formal language theory, concurrent programming, complexity or algorithms, programming language theory, graphics and other computer science topics. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics.


Counseling ‐ General

  
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    CNGC 500 - Research and Evaluation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course is designed to help prepare counselor education students who intend to work in mental health, PreK-12 or higher education settings, and who may also be seeking licensure as one or more of the following: Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC), School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor, or School Counselor as practitioner-scientists. The purpose of this course is to provide a framework for counselors to evaluate the efficiency of research studies that have implications for the practice of counseling. Students will become familiar with research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment and program evaluation as it relates to the counseling profession. Students will be exposed to ethical and legal considerations, diversity and equity as it relates to conducting research in counseling.

  
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    CNGC 502 - Research

    (3 or 6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Original research is undertaken by the graduate student in their field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    CNGC 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Completion of 15 approved graduate credits and acceptance in the counseling program; consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in the counseling field or engage in fieldwork in addition to what is required in each program option. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    CNGC 504 - Research and Evaluation II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 500 or PSYC 500 or SCWK 541; and matriculation in MEd or CAGS or Postmaster’s in Counseling or MA in Psychology or MSW
    The completion of a research project is the main objective of this course, which is designed to facilitate the academic and professional development of the advanced graduate student. This counseling focused research project must be an original work.

  
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    CNGC 508 - Creativity in Counseling

    (1.5 or 3 credits)
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to methods of integrating creativity and expressive therapy modalities into the therapeutic relationship. Students will be exposed to different variations of creativity in counseling such as art therapy, sand tray therapy, music therapy, metaphors in counseling, adventure based counseling, and forms of ceremonies in therapy. Ethical considerations for using creativity in counseling will be addressed, as well as national organizations that govern the various creative modalities. Students will be provided with the basic concepts and methods of these specialty areas. Information presented in this course will be explored through discussions, readings and basic experiential activities.

  
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    CNGC 515 - Performance Psychology for Athletes and Performance Artists

    (3 credits)
    This course will examine various performance enhancement protocols utilized in sports and the performing arts. Performance psychology is concerned with the psychological aspects of performance in sport, exercise, performing arts, business and life (i.e., enhancing well-being, test anxiety, etc.). This is a practice-based course where students will examine theories and interventions used to enhance performance and overall well-being as well as the practical application of skills.

  
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    CNGC 520 - Group Experience

    (0 credit)
    Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with CNGC 538
    All matriculated MEd counselor education students are required to participate in a confidential, small-group experience provided by the department. This non-graded, eight-session activity will be facilitated by a licensed clinician who is not a member of the faculty and will provide counselors-in-training with direct experience as a member of a group. Completion of this requirement is a prerequisite for the Advanced Applied Counseling Course. This course is graded on an (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
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    CNGC 529 - Multicultural Counseling

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNMH 528 or CNSA 528 or CNSC 528, which may be taken concurrently; and matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This skill-based course will further develop the students’ working knowledge and basic competency in multicultural counseling theory and application. For the counseling student who intends to work in mental health, PreK-12 or higher education settings, and who may also be seeking licensure as one or more of the following: LMHC, School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor, or School Counselor. To this end, the course will focus on the counselor on both a professional and personal level. Additionally, the course will examine salient client population-specific issues related to the life experiences and world view of the culturally different client and how such experiences impact on the counseling relationship and therapeutic process. Underlying values and assumptions associated with widely used traditional counseling interventions and their appropriateness with disenfranchised populations will be explored. Traditional and nontraditional culturally-consonant counseling approaches will also be discussed.

  
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    CNGC 538 - Group I: Theory and Process of Group Interaction

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNMH 528 or CNSA 528 or CNSC 528 or PSYC 509; and matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor; must be taken concurrently with CNGC 520
    Group I is an experiential course designed to provide students who intend to work in mental health, PreK-12 or higher education settings, and who may also be seeking licensure as one or more of the following: LMHC, School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor or School Counselor, with the opportunity to co-facilitate, participate, observe and analyze group process. Emphasis will be placed on the synthesis of leadership, membership and purpose, as well as the development of various types of groups and counseling applications for a variety of settings.

  
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    CNGC 539 - Introduction to Career Counseling

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course will review concepts, issues, trends and tools as they relate to career development. It is designed to consider the role of the professional counselor in the career decision-making process embedded within lifestyle and life-stage factors. Topics will include, but not be limited to, career development theory, career assessment tools, interest, skills and personality inventories, career resource materials, technology and the implementation of career counseling strategies.

  
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    CNGC 560 - Special Topics in Counseling

    (1-3 credits)
    Special topics of current relevance in counseling will be offered from time to time. The topic to be addressed will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
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    CNGC 561 - Grief Counseling

    (3 credits)
    This course is an introduction to the theory and application of grief models as they apply to individuals and families, including techniques and strategies to assist clients and students dealing with issues related to grief and loss in a variety of settings (school, mental health, college/student affairs). The course will stress the importance of the professional counselor’s self-awareness and counselor impact on the therapeutic process, as well as the role of ritual, spirituality and multicultural perspectives on grief. At the core of the course will be a respect for the “client’s” cultural contextual, a recognition of the importance of culture and other critical intervening factors on the counseling and grief process, and the maintenance of high ethical standards.

  
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    CNGC 563 - Psychopharmacology for Nonmedical Professionals

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course is for the counseling student who intends to work in mental health or PreK-12 settings, and who may also be seeking licensure as one or more of the following: Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC), School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor or School Counselor. It examines modern medication treatments for psychological disorders, including schizophrenia, mania, depression and anxiety. Additional problems such as ADHD/ADD, steroids, alcohol and cigarette dependency, street drugs and inhalants will be examined. Types of medications reviewed are the following: antipsychotics, antidepressants, antianxiety, sedative-hypnotics, over-the-counter and herbal alternatives are discussed in conjunction with diagnostic factors, effectiveness, side effects, risk and biological actions.

  
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    CNGC 567 - Marital and Family Therapy

    (3 credits)
    This course is an examination of schools of family systems and treatment intervention options. Attention will be given to the history and development of marital family therapy, current schools of therapy, intervention strategies and the role of the counselor in marital and family work. Professional standards for marital and family therapy will be reviewed.

  
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    CNGC 582 - Preventive Counseling

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course is for the counseling student who intends to work in mental health, PreK-12 or higher education settings, and who may also be seeking licensure as one or more of the following: Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC), School Social Worker/Adjustment Counselor or School Counselor. It will explore the wide variety of factors in society and the community that affect the well-being of the client in school, agency/community and higher education settings. Emphasis will be on addressing human problems through community counseling and consultation within a framework of multiculturalism, professional standards and equity, and using technology to enhance the development and delivery of community counseling interventions. Topics include consultation, referral, program development, intervention strategies, outreach, general systems theory, community counseling, person/environment “fit” and action/evaluation research.

  
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    CNGC 585 - Capstone in Counseling – Portfolio

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of department chairperson
    This course is designed to assist students in successfully creating a capstone portfolio that demonstrates mastery of the basic competencies necessary to function as a counseling professional. Students’ projects will utilize the core areas of their discipline in accordance with the CACREP (Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs) standards. Students must successfully present their final capstone portfolio at a formal capstone defense meeting. This course is graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
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    CNGC 586 - Capstone in Counseling – Project Paper

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of department chairperson
    This course is designed to assist students in successfully creating a capstone project paper that demonstrates mastery of the basic competencies necessary to function as a counseling professional. Students’ projects will utilize the core areas of their discipline in accordance with the CACREP (Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs) standards. Students must successfully present their final capstone project paper at a formal capstone defense meeting. This course is graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
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    CNGC 587 - Counseling the Military Family

    (1.5 or 3 credits)
    This course prepares students to understand the stressors that being in the military, as a reservist, National Guard, or as regular military person, places on the family. Information regarding agencies and community services for military families will be presented for example the Veterans Administration programs, the Military Child Education Coalition and the American Red Cross programs, which supports the children and family of the National Guard and Reservist. Information regarding means to receive books, community resources and CD’s to aid in counseling of the families is included. Techniques to counsel the family members, including the service member through these trying times and tailoring these techniques to your unique setting will be explored. The military culture as framework for understanding the family will be presented.

  
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    CNGC 643 - Methods of Legacy Exploration and Preservation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance in LEPG Certificate program or approval of program coordinator. Open to licensed psychologists, licensed mental health counselors, licensed independent clinical social workers, licensed marriage and family counselors, psychiatric nurses (nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist license), pastoral counselors, or matriculating graduate students in programs leading to one of the above licenses.
    This introductory course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn about the many and diverse methods for exploring and preserving one’s heritage and legacy. Students will explore the notion of legacy and identify a piece of their legacy to explore, preserve, and share; culminating in a semester-long project (e.g., conduct oral histories, create a short movie, explore and document genealogy, create a photo book, etc.). Both didactic and experiential teaching methods will help participants gain knowledge and competence about the various methods. Offered summer session.

  
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    CNGC 644 - Legacy Exploration and Preservation Model

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 643
    This course will review foundational group work principles, ethical considerations in group settings and provide knowledge and effective group work strategies for the delivery of wellness groups. Both didactic and experiential teaching methods will help participants gain knowledge and competence with conducting Legacy Exploration and Preservation Groups with adults in different stages of development. Students will have the opportunity to practice these groups strategies in-class. Offered fall semester.

  
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    CNGC 645 - Legacy Exploration and Preservation Group Co-facilitation Experience

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 644
    This experientially based course provides students with the opportunity to co-facilitate a group with a trained and licensed mental health group worker using the Legacy Exploration and Preservation Group Model. Students will be mentored and supervised with how to prepare, conduct, and process these groups in accordance with Best Practices in Group Work while conducting an actual group with their instructor. Offered spring semester.


Counseling ‐ Mental Health

  
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    CNMH 528 - Counseling Theories and Techniques for Mental Health Counseling

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course will introduce the Mental Health Counseling student to the major counseling theories and will infuse practical application of the techniques and skills associated with each theory. These theories will be examined with respect to their overall worldview and practice in the context of clinical settings. In addition to theories, a secondary course emphasis will be on counselor self-reflection and self-awareness as well as working with individual clients. Additional areas that will be infused in the course include: culture and other contextual factors, diversity in a broad context, ecological systems, ethical considerations and prevention strategies.

  
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    CNMH 532 - Psychological Assessment

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 500; and matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course will examine the basic principles and components of individual and group psychological assessment and is designed for the counselor education student who intends to work in mental health settings or PreK-12 settings, and who may also be seeking licensure as one or more of the following: Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) or School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor. The student will be introduced to the most commonly used assessment tools and practices for measuring intelligence, achievement, aptitude, interest, career and personality. Basic concepts of standardized testing and statistical concepts such as measures of central tendency, variability, norm and criterion referenced tests and types of reliability and validity will be explained for each test discussed. Critical issues and procedures such as technology, ethical, diversity and multicultural aspects related to the administration, scoring, interpretation and report writing for individual and group tests will be emphasized. (Formerly CNGC 532)

  
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    CNMH 534 - The Professional Counselor: Standards, Ethics and Legal Issues

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course, which is for the graduate counseling student who intends to work in mental health or PreK-12 settings, and who is seeking licensure as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) or School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor, will examine the current trends in the area of ethical and legal issues that affect the professional counselor, as well as the process of ethical decision-making. Legal and ethical issues dealing with informed consent, confidentiality, duty to warn, neglect and abuse, family rights and special education will be among the topics to be studied. Ethical standards of the ACA and codes germane to specific counseling associations will be reviewed and discussed. Guidelines and competencies for working with multicultural and other special populations will also be examined.

  
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    CNMH 535 - Applied Counseling: Adolescent-Adult

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNMH 528; and matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling
    In this course, awareness of characteristics and behaviors that influence the helping process will be explored, such as developmental issues, multicultural, ascribed and achieved personality characteristics. Students who intend to work with adolescents and/or adults in school or mental health settings, and who may also be seeking licensure as one or more of the following: Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) or School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor will develop basic interviewing and counseling skills for the purpose of establishing a therapeutic relationship, diagnosis of client problems and implementing appropriate counseling treatment goals within the ethical guidelines. (Formerly CNGC 535)

  
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    CNMH 536 - Applied Counseling: Pre-Adolescent

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNMH 528; and matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling
    This course is designed to assist the counseling student who intends to work in mental health or PreK-12 settings, and who may also be seeking licensure as one or more of the following: Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) or School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor, with learning effective therapeutic techniques for working with young children. The course will examine developmental child psychopathology from a constructivist perspective. Using this model, various approaches to child therapy and collaboration skills will be applied and evaluated. No preferred treatment modality will be espoused; rather, students will be expected to make use of a combination of techniques and integrate various forms of intervention. Moreover, diversity, psychological development, technology and professionalism will be integrated throughout the course. (Formerly CNGC 536)

  
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    CNMH 540 - Substance Abuse and Dependency

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course is an overview of substance abuse and dependency, including etiological and treatment models, current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) diagnostic criteria and differential diagnosis according to the current DSM. Also included are discussions of evidence based treatments and basic strategies for evaluating counseling outcomes in addiction counseling.

  
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    CNMH 564 - Theories of Psychological Development

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNMH 528; and matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course will examine traditional and contemporary theories of psychological development. Each theory will be examined from a multicultural perspective. Students who intend to work in mental health, or PreK-12 settings, and who may also be seeking licensure as either an LMHC, School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor or School Counselor, will learn how to apply psychological theories of development in assessing client issues and formulate appropriate interventions.

  
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    CNMH 568 - Psychopathology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNMH 528; and matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course will provide an examination of the classification system, diagnostic criteria, and differential diagnosis according to the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Attention will be given to issues of diversity, etiology and treatment options.

  
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    CNMH 569 - Crisis/Disaster Counseling

    (1.5 credits)
    This is a foundations course which consists of interactive discussions and group activities designed to support participants learning key concepts, knowledge and skills required in crisis and disaster mental health work. Students will learn the American Red Cross, Foundations of Disaster Mental Health ARC 3077-4. The differentiation between traditional counseling and crisis and disaster mental health counseling will be emphasized. Emphasis will be on recognition of the psychological impact of crisis/disasters on survivors. The 1.5 credit course will present an introduction to the field of crisis/disaster mental health work.

  
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    CNMH 570 - Advanced Applied Counseling: Mental Health Counselor

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 520, which may be taken concurrently (for students admitted after 5/1/06); and CNGC 529 and CNMH 528; and CNGC 538, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 534 and CNMH 535 and CNMH 568; and a practicum application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This course will include a minimum of 100 hours of field experience and is designed to provide the advanced counseling student who intends to work in mental health or PreK-12 settings and who is seeking licensure as a LMHC or school social worker/school adjustment counselor, with an opportunity to further examine and effectively apply counseling theory into practice and demonstrate this ability during the required practicum experience. Students will actively work with clients in the role of mental health counselor. Emphasis will be placed upon the application of counseling techniques to clients over the lifespan and the further refinement of the counseling student’s individual counseling style and increased self-awareness. Maximum use of clinical supervision, audio/video tape, role-play and observation will be made. Moreover, overarching issues such as multiculturalism, psychological development, technology, context and ethics/professionalism will be integrated throughout this course. Students must submit an internship application by the first week of April for summer and fall semesters or by November for spring semester.

  
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    CNMH 571 - Internship: Mental Health Counselor

    (3-12 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 563, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 536, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 540, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 570 or CNMH 580; and a fieldwork application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This variable-credit fieldwork experience is for the advanced counseling graduate student seeking a license as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Massachusetts (LMHC) and/or a School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor. Students seeking licensure as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) must complete a minimum of 600 hours of fieldwork at a mental health site. Students pursuing an LMHC and a license as a School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor must complete a minimum of 450 hours of fieldwork at a mental health site and 450 hours at a school-based mental health site. Students may work 10-40 hours per 15-week semester and will register for three credits for each 150 hours of fieldwork they will complete that semester. For example, 10 hours per week/150 total hours = three credits; 20 hours per week/300 total hours = six credits; 30 hours per week/450 total hours = nine credits; 40 hours per week/600 total hours = 12 credits. The 40 hours per week/600 total hours/12-credit semester option is not available when interning at an educational site. Students must attend a clinical seminar each semester they are involved in field experience and must attend a minimum of two seminars. Students must submit an application by the first week of April for the summer and fall semesters or by November for the spring semester. All fieldwork sites must conform to the current licensing regulations including having an approved on-site supervisor as defined by the Board of Registration of Allied Mental Health Professionals for a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (see 262 CMR). This experience may be repeated up to five times for a maximum total of 18 credits.

  
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    CNMH 580 - Advanced Applied Counseling: Mental Health Counselor - Dual License

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 520, which may be taken concurrently (for students admitted after 5/1/06); and CNGC 529 and CNMH 528; and CNGC 538, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 534 and CNMH 535 and CNMH 568; and a practicum application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This course will include a minimum of 100 hours of field experience and is designed to provide the advanced counseling student who intends to work in mental health or PreK-12 settings, and who is seeking license as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) or School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor, with an opportunity to further examine and effectively apply counseling theory into practice and demonstrate this ability during the required practicum experience. Students will actively work with clients in the role of mental health counselor in an educational setting. Emphasis will be placed upon the application of counseling techniques to clients and the further refinement of the counseling student’s individual counseling style and increased self-awareness. Maximum use of clinical supervision, audio/video tape, role play and observation will be made. Moreover, overarching issues such as multiculturalism, psychological development, technology, context and ethics/professionalism will be integrated throughout this course. Students must submit an internship application by the first week of April for summer and fall semesters or by November for spring semester.

  
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    CNMH 582 - Internship: Mental Health Counselor - Dual License

    (3-9 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNMH 536, which may be taken concurrently; and CNGC 563, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 540, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 570 or CNMH 580; and a fieldwork application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This variable-credit fieldwork experience is for the advanced counseling graduate student who is seeking a license as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Massachusetts (LMHC) and a School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor. Students pursuing dual licensure must complete a minimum of 450 hours of fieldwork at a mental health site and 450 hours at a school-based mental health site. Students may work 10-30 hours per 15-week semester and will register for three credits for each 150 hours of fieldwork they will complete that semester. For example, 10 hours per week/150 total hours = three credits; 20 hours per week/300 total hours = six credits; 30 hours per week/450 total hours = nine credits. Students must attend a clinical seminar each semester they are involved in field experience and must attend a minimum of two seminars over their 900 total hours/18 credits of fieldwork experience. Students must submit an application by the first week of April for the summer and fall semesters or by November for the spring semester. All fieldwork sites must conform to the current licensing regulations including having an approved on-site supervisor as defined by both the Board of Registration of Allied Mental Health Professionals for a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (see 262 CMR) and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education for a School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor. This experience may be repeated up to two times for a maximum total of nine credits.

  
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    CNMH 589 - Trauma: Diagnosis and Treatment

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNMH 528
    Trauma will be examined via the DSM criteria as a foundation on which to expand one’s understanding of its all encompassing effects on an individual’s life. Some of the variables considered which affect the manifestation of the traumatic experience are the following; developmental stage, psychobiological adaptation, culture, time of seeking treatment, and family. Coping behaviors with adverse consequences such as alcohol and drug use, eating disorders and co-occurring disorders such as panic attacks, dissociation, and depression will be discussed. Suicide risk assessment techniques will be practiced via role plays. Empirically based treatments will be presented for example; Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), prolonged exposure, Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD), and play therapy.

  
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    CNMH 671 - CAGS Internship: Mental Health Counselor

    (3-12 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNMH 536, which may be taken concurrently; and CNGC 538; and CNGC 563, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 540, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 570; and a fieldwork application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This variable-credit fieldwork experience is for the advanced CAGS in Mental Health Counseling student seeking a license as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Massachusetts (LMHC). Students may work 10-40 hours per 15-week semester and will register for three credits for each 150 hours of fieldwork they will complete that semester. For example, 10 hours per week/150 total hours = three credits. Students must attend a clinical seminar each semester they are involved in field experience and must attend a minimum total of two seminars. Students must submit an application by the first week of April for the fall semester internship or by November for the spring semester internship. All fieldwork sites must conform to the current licensing regulations including having an approved on-site supervisor as defined by the Board of Registration of Allied Mental Health Professionals for a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (see 262 CMR). This experience may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits.


Counseling ‐ School

  
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    CNSC 515 - Ethical and Legal Issues for the School Counselor

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course will provide school counselors with a comprehensive examination of pertinent ethical issues and laws. A brief overview of the judicial system covering federal, state, and district policies will be covered as it pertains to school counselors. Course topics will include individual and institutional rights and responsibilities, communication privileges, malpractice liability, Americans with Disabilities Act, due process, IDEA, FERPA, 504, standards of practice, and ethical codes of the American School Counselor Association and the American Counselor Association. (Formerly CNSG 515)

  
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    CNSC 516 - Foundations in School Counseling

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 500 and admission to the Department of Counselor Education; or consent of instructor
    The course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the theory and practice of school counseling specific to K-12 school settings. This course will seek to increase awareness of the framework and rationale for a comprehensive school counseling program as delineated by the ASCA National Model as well as the MASCA Model and MA DESE competencies. Students will examine the missions, domains, goals and standards/competencies as they relate to the delivery system in the school context. In addition, students will examine delivery systems by evaluating counseling curriculums, individual student planning, responsive services, system reports and accountability. (Formerly CNSG 516)

  
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    CNSC 523 - The School Counselor: Psychological Development and Clinical Issues

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNSC 528, which may be taken concurrently; and matriculation in the MEd or postmaster’s program in school counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course is an examination of child and adolescent psychological development as well as the clinical issues encountered in today’s school settings. In this course, students will examine psychological theories of development, developmental issues and crises, and learn a basic understanding of the DSM classification system and symptoms of psychopathology specific to the delivery of services as delineated in the ASCA and MASCA Models. (Formerly CNSG 523)

  
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    CNSC 524 - Applied School Counseling

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNSC 516 and CNSC 528, which may be taken concurrently; and matriculation in the MEd or postmaster’s school counseling program
    This course is designed to teach basic counseling and delivery skills to the School Counselor working in K-12 educational settings. Students will utilize a developmental framework to employ counseling skills in the delivery of guidance curriculums, individual planning, responsive services and system support. Students will continue to learn how to integrate professional ethics, legal standards, technology, developmental theories and multicultural competencies in the practice of school counseling. (Formerly CNSG 524)

  
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    CNSC 526 - Consultation and Collaboration for School Counselors

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the theory and practice of consultation specific to school counselors within the K-12 school settings. This course will provide students with a framework for implementing consultation and collaboration models, as well as understanding the facilitation factors necessary in any type of school consultation. Consultation theory, consultation/collaboration methods and current research regarding the delivery of indirect (consultation) services will be addressed in the context of working with a variety of constituencies. Students will learn how to use consultation and collaboration models to assist school counselors when working with individual, group, and programmatic assessment of growth, and developing intervention strategies as part of the ASCA delivery systems in the schools. (Formerly CNSG 526)

  
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    CNSC 527 - Special Education Issues for School Counselors

    3 credits
    Prerequisite: CNSC 516, which may be taken concurrently; and matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course is designed to facilitate a deeper understanding of the responsibilities and legal obligations of the professional school counselor as it relates to special education students and connects to practical application in the PreK-12 schools. Participants will experience structured theoretical and applied instruction in special education issues including, but not limited to, special education history, terminology and disability categories, the assessment and referral process, process and services K-college, legal and ethical considerations, amplification needs of students with disabilities as it relates to the American School Counselor Domains, understanding and integration of the MA Model for Comprehensive School Counseling program, and partnering with the parents of students with disabilities.

  
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    CNSC 528 - Counseling Theories and Techniques for School Counseling

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course will introduce the School Counseling student to the major counseling theories and will infuse practical applications of the techniques and skills associated with each theory. These theories will be examined with respect to their overall worldview and practice in the context of school settings. In addition to theories, a secondary course emphasis will be on counselor self-reflection and self-awareness as well as working with individual clients. Additional areas that will be infused in the course include: culture and other contextual factors, diversity in a broad context, ecological systems, ethical considerations and prevention strategies.

  
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    CNSC 560 - Special Topics in School Counseling

    (1-3 credits)
    This variable-credit course provides students with an opportunity for in-depth exploration of a current topic in school counseling. Relevant theory will be discussed, as well as concerns related to multiculturalism and diversity, technology and ethical issues. This course may be repeated for different topics. (Formerly CNSG 560)

  
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    CNSC 563 - Internship: School Counselor (5-12)

    (3-9 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNSC 523 and CNSC 580 and an internship application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This variable credit fieldwork experience is for students who are employed in the role of a 5-12 school counselor. Students pursuing a license as a school counselor must complete a minimum of 600 hours of fieldwork over at least two semesters at an educational site. Students may work 10-30 hours per 15 week semester and will register for three credits for each 150 hours of fieldwork they will complete that semester. For example, 10 hours per week/150 total hours = three credits; 20 hours per week/300 total hours = six credits; 30 hours per week/450 total hours = nine credits. Students must attend a clinical seminar each semester they are involved in field experience. Students must submit an application by April for the fall semester internship or by November for the spring semester internship. This experience may be repeated up to four times for a total of 12 credits. (Formerly CNSG 563)

  
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    CNSC 570 - Advanced Applied Counseling – School Counselor: (PreK-8)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 520 and CNGC 529 and CNGC 538 and CNGC 539 and CNSC 515 and CNSC 516 and CNSC 524 and CNSC 527 and CNSC 528, all of which may be taken concurrently; and a pre-practicum application approved by the director of fieldwork (postmaster’s candidates are not required to complete CNGC 520)
    This course will include a minimum of 100 hours of field experience at an elementary or middle school setting and is designed to provide the advanced counseling student with an opportunity to further examine and effectively apply counseling theory to practice and demonstrate this ability during the pre-practicum experience. Students will actively work with clients in the role of counselor under the direct supervision of a professional counselor at an approved site. Emphasis will be placed upon the application of counseling techniques to the pre-adolescent population and the further refinement of a student’s personal counseling style and self-awareness. Maximum use of clinical supervision, audio/video tape, role-play and observation will be made. Moreover, overarching issues such as multiculturalism, psychological development, technology and context will be integrated throughout this course. (Formerly CNSG 570)

  
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    CNSC 571 - Practicum: School Counselor (PreK-8)

    (3-9 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNSC 523 and CNSC 526 and CNSC 570; and a practicum application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This variable credit fieldwork experience is for the advanced master’s counseling graduate student who is seeking a license as a school counselor (PreK-8) in Massachusetts. Students pursuing a license as a school counselor must complete a minimum of 600 hours of fieldwork over at least two semesters and at most four semesters at an educational site. Students will register for three credits for each 150 hours of fieldwork they will complete that semester. While completing fieldwork hours, students must attend the accompanying fieldwork seminar class in conjunction with completing their fieldwork hours. The seminar meetings will serve to provide group supervision as well as integrate knowledge and assist with application of theory to practice. Students must submit a completed fieldwork application; see counselor education student handbook. This experience may be repeated for a total of 12 credits. (Formerly CNSG 571)

  
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    CNSC 580 - Advanced Applied Counseling – School Counselor: (5-12)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 529 and CNSC 516 and CNSC 524 and CNSC 528; and CNGC 520 and CNGC 538 and CNGC 539 and CNSC 515 and CNSC 527, all which may be taken concurrently; and a pre-practicum application approved by the director of fieldwork (postmaster’s candidates are not required to complete CNGC 520)
    This course will include a minimum of 100 hours of field experience at a middle school or high school setting and is designed to provide the advanced counseling student with an opportunity to further examine and effectively apply counseling theory to practice and demonstrate this ability during the required pre-practicum experience. Students will actively work with clients in the role of counselor under the direct supervision of a professional counselor at an approved site. Emphasis will be placed upon the application of counseling techniques to the adolescent population and the further refinement of a student’s personal counseling style and self-awareness. Maximum use of clinical supervision, audio/video tape, role-play and observation will be made. Moreover, overarching issues such as multiculturalism, psychological development, technology and context, will be integrated throughout this course. (Formerly CNSG 580)

  
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    CNSC 581 - Practicum: School Counselor (5-12)

    (3-9 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNSC 523 and CNSC 526 and CNSC 580; and a practicum application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This variable credit fieldwork experience is for the advanced master’s counseling graduate student who is seeking a license as a school counselor (5-12) in Massachusetts. Students pursuing a license as a school counselor must complete a minimum of 600 hours of fieldwork over at least two semesters and at most four semesters at an educational site. Students will register for three credits for each 150 hours of fieldwork they will complete that semester. While completing fieldwork hours, students must attend the accompanying fieldwork seminar class in conjunction with completing their fieldwork hours. The seminar meetings will serve to provide group supervision as well as integrate knowledge and assist with application of theory to practice. Students must submit a completed fieldwork application; see counselor education student handbook. This experience may be repeated for a total of 12 credits. (Formerly CNSC 581)

  
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    CNSC 671 - Practicum in School Counseling for Postmaster’s (PreK-8)

    (3-9 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNSC 523 and CNSC 526 and CNSC 570; and an application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This variable credit fieldwork experience is for the advanced post-master’s counseling graduate student who is seeking a license as a school counselor (PreK-8) in Massachusetts. Students pursuing a license as a school counselor must complete a minimum of 450 hours of fieldwork over at least one semester and at most three semesters at an educational site. Students will register for three credits for each 150 hours of fieldwork they will complete that semester. While completing fieldwork hours, students must attend the accompanying fieldwork seminar class in conjunction with completing their fieldwork hours. The seminar meetings will serve to provide group supervision as well as integrate knowledge and assist with application of theory to practice. Students must submit a completed fieldwork application; see counselor education student handbook. This experience may be repeated for a total of nine credits.

  
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    CNSC 681 - Practicum in School Counseling for Postmaster’s (5-12)

    (3-9 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNSC 523 and CNSC 526 and CNSC 580; and a practicum application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This variable credit fieldwork experience is for the advanced post-master’s counseling graduate student who is seeking a license as a school counselor (5-12) in Massachusetts. Students pursuing a license as a school counselor must complete a minimum of 450 hours of fieldwork over at least one semester and at most three semesters at an educational site. Students will register for three credits for each 150 hours of fieldwork they will complete that semester. While completing fieldwork hours, students must attend the accompanying fieldwork seminar class in conjunction with completing their fieldwork hours. The seminar meetings will serve to provide group supervision as well as integrate knowledge and assist with application of theory to practice. Students must submit a completed fieldwork application; see counselor education student handbook. This experience may be repeated for a total of nine credits.


Counseling ‐ Student Affairs

  
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    CNSA 510 - Student Development Theory in Higher Education

    (3 credits)
    This course is an introduction to student development theory and related developmental issues encountered by students in higher education settings. This course will cover developmental issues, such as racial, sexual, gender, cognitive, ethical and emotional identity development. Students will learn how to apply developmental theories to direct student affairs practice. Basic concepts, philosophies and current models, practices and issues in the field will be studied. (Formerly CNSA 551)

  
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    CNSA 515 - Foundations in Higher Education Counseling for Student Affairs Practice

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the student affairs profession, its historical foundations, and its roles and functions. The course will address the college and university settings where the profession is practiced, as well as the skills and competencies needed by practitioners to address student development issues. The course will explore the relationship between academic and student affairs and the importance of applying student development theory to practical applications with college students. Students will be exposed to current issues regarding student affairs in higher education. Topics covered in the course include (but are not limited to) institutional mission, organization and administrative models in higher education, training and supervision of staff, program planning and ethical and legal issues in higher education, fiscal and budget management, and good practice in student affairs. (Formerly CNSA 523)

  
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    CNSA 520 - Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues in Student Affairs

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth exploration of ethical, legal and professional issues relating to student affairs practice, including but not limited to confidentiality, student privacy, contracts, technology/the Internet, boundaries and dual/multiple relationships, record keeping, supervision of paraprofessional undergraduate/graduate student staff, mental health issues of college students and professional practice in student affairs. Students will acquire knowledge on ethical refection and the core ethical principles in student affairs practice. Students will also learn models that infuse multicultural and diversity issues throughout the ethical decision-making process. Students will gain awareness on how legal issues impact student affairs practice and policy development. Students will learn how to manage organizations and structures within student affairs and higher education, and foster collaborative approaches with key campus constituents and administrators.

  
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    CNSA 525 - Student Affairs Administration

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of student affairs and higher education administration practice. The course will address the various administrative functions for student affairs administrators, such as fiscal and budget management, organizational development, supervision, training, and evaluation of graduate and paraprofessional staff, program planning, needs assessment, fostering partnerships between academic and student affairs, and ways to integrate student development theory into administration policy and development. Students will discuss ways that administrative decision-making impacts student well-being and campus environments and how policies and procedures are created.

  
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    CNSA 528 - Counseling Theories and Techniques for Student Affairs Counseling

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MEd or CAGS or postmaster’s program in counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course will introduce the Student Affairs student to the major counseling theories and will infuse practical application of the techniques and skills associated with each theory. These theories will be examined with respect to their overall worldview and practice in the context of Student Affairs. In addition to theories, a secondary course emphasis will be counselor self-reflection and self-awareness as well as working with individual clients. Additional areas that will be infused in the course include: culture and other contextual factors, diversity in a broad context, ecological systems, ethical considerations and prevention strategies.

  
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    CNSA 530 - Helping Skills for Student Affairs Professionals

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to acquaint students with the counseling skills, interventions and techniques that are used within a student affairs setting. Through lectures, discussions, role-plays, demonstrations and videotaped vignettes, students will develop the skills and the conceptual frameworks that are necessary for effective counseling with college students. Students will learn basic crisis intervention strategies in order to effectively respond to a variety of mental health-related issues on campus. Students will discuss appropriate referral procedures and ways to foster critical collaborative relationships with institutional and community resources. Professional ethics, legal standards, technology, developmental theories and multicultural competencies will be integrated within the practice of counseling in a student affairs capacity.

  
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    CNSA 560 - Special Topics in Student Affairs

    (1-3 credits)
    This variable credit course provides students with an opportunity for in-depth exploration of a current topic in student affairs. Relevant theory will be discussed, as well as concerns related to multiculturalism and diversity, technology and ethical issues. Students may take this special topics course numerous times with permission of the program director or course instructor.

  
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    CNSA 570 - Advanced Applied Counseling: Student Affairs Counseling

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNGC 520, which may be taken concurrently; and CNSA 528 and CNGC 529 and CNGC 538, which may be taken concurrently; and CNMH 535 or CNSA 530 (only CNSA 530 if admitted after 5/1/06); and CNSA 510 and CNSA 520 and CNSA 523; and a practicum application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This course includes a minimum of 150 hours of field experience and is designed to provide the advanced student affairs counseling student with an opportunity to further examine and effectively apply counseling and student development theory to practice, and demonstrate this ability during the required practicum experience. Students will actively work with college students/clients in the role of counselor under the direct supervision of a student affairs professional counselor at an approved site. Emphasis will be placed upon the application of counseling techniques to the adolescent/adult population and the further refinement of a student’s individual counseling style and self-awareness. Maximum use of clinical supervision, audio/video tape, role play and observation will be made. Moreover, overarching issues such as multiculturalism, psychological development, student development, technology and context will be integrated throughout this course. (Formerly CNHE 570)

  
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    CNSA 571 - Internship: Student Affairs Counselor

    (3-12 credits)
    Prerequisite: CNSA 570 and an internship application approved by the director of fieldwork
    This variable credit fieldwork experience is for the Student Affairs student seeking experience in various higher education settings. Students must complete a minimum total of 600 hours at an approved higher education site. Students may work 10-40 hours per 15-week semester and will register for three credits for each 150 hours of fieldwork they will complete that semester. For example, 10 hours per week/150 total hours = three credits; 20 hours per week/300 total hours = six credits; 30 hours per week/450 total hours = nine credits; 40 hours per week/600 total hours = 12 credits. The 40 hours per week/600 total hours/12-credit semester option is only available if the student is interning at a minimum of two different functional student affairs settings/departments. Students must submit an application by April for the fall semester or by November for the spring semester. (Formerly CNHE 572)


Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJU 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    CRJU 201 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    This course provides an overview of the American criminal justice system, including the development and structure of the system. It surveys the roles and relationships among the key actors in the system, including police, courts, juries, prosecutors and corrections agencies and institutions. The course also examines the relations between society, crime and the criminal justice system. Offered both semesters.

  
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    CRJU 202 - Crime Theory

    (3 credits)
    This course provides an overview of the theoretical frameworks for explaining criminal behavior. Each of the major criminological paradigms – biological, psychological, environmental, social, political, economic and integrated theories – will be discussed. The historical, political and social context in which these theories emerged and the policy implications of the theories will also be presented. The class will focus on each theory’s major tenets, its social context, and critiques of its assumptions and reasoning.

  
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    CRJU 213 - The Juvenile Justice System

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202, both may be taken concurrently
    The primary focus of this course is to understand the purpose, organization and function of the juvenile justice system. This course also examines the evolution of the juvenile justice system – its philosophy, aims, objectives and dilemmas.

  
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    CRJU 227 - Deviance and Social Control

    (3 credits) Cross Listed with SOCI 227
    Prerequisite: SOCI 102 and CRJU 201; or consent of instructor
    This course examines deviant acts with an eye toward understanding social order and change. Topics covered include the types and causes of deviance, the social conditions and elements of deviant acts, and the effects of deviance and mechanisms for prevention, punishing and rehabilitating deviant individuals and groups. (Formerly CRJU/SOCI 327)

  
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    CRJU 241 - Women and Violence

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 or consent of instructor
    Within a global perspective that recognizes the myriad and diverse experiences of women, this course examines the continuum of violence that affects women’s lives, as victims and/or perpetrators. Framed by cross-cultural analyses of trends and patterns, students investigate how historical, socio-political and economic conditions shape the way women experience and respond to domination and exploitation. Specifically, the course examines violence against women that is differentially racialized, class- based and gendered, as well as how such acts of violence and violation shape a woman’s sense of identity. Topics include sexual violence, intimate partner violence, media portrayal of violence against women, women street crime offenders and women in prison. (CMCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    CRJU 255 - Juvenile Delinquency

    (3 credits) Cross Listed with SOCI 255
    Prerequisite: SOCI 102 or CRJU 201; or consent of instructor
    This course includes the analysis of the nature and types of juvenile behavior that violates law; the mechanisms of defining such behavior as delinquent; and the relationship between delinquency and the social situations of juvenile offenders. Offered fall semester. (Formerly CRJU/SOCI 355)

  
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    CRJU 271 - Crime Victims and the Political Process

    (3 credits)
    The goal of this course is to expand and evaluate students’ knowledge of how crime victims influence criminal justice policy. Students will gain knowledge by exploring if, how and when crime victims affect legislators’ view on crime. The course examines the media’s role in promoting a victim’s view and the impact on crime policy. The role of victims’ rights groups and their political goals, methods and efficacy will also be examined. The role of race, class and gender in crime victims’ access to legislators and media outlets will also be discussed. Students will complete the course with a critical and analytical view of the growing and unchallenged influence of crime victims in policymaking.

  
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    CRJU 280 - Environmental Criminology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202; or consent of instructor
    This course will introduce students to the principles of environmental criminology. Emphasis will be placed on crime events (robberies, burglaries) and the interactions of their corresponding components: victims, offenders and places. Students will further examine how the criminal justice system works with those organizations outside of the criminal justice community (e.g., social service agencies, educational institutions, political agencies and community organizations) in developing effective crime prevention initiatives. Offered annually.

  
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    CRJU 290 - Mental Health in the Criminal Justice System

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course provides an in-depth look at mental health in the criminal justice system. The social construction of mental illness is analyzed both historically and currently to better understand the treatment of the mentally ill in institutions. Specifically, this course discusses the criminalization of individuals with mental illnesses, the process of deinstitutionalization, law enforcement responses to the mentally ill, applicable legal issues, mental health in jail and prison, and re-entry for individuals with mental health issues. (CMCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    CRJU 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking- intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    CRJU 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    CRJU 320 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course focuses on the commonly used research methods found in criminal justice. Using crime and justice contexts, topics covered include research design, the relationship between theory and research types of data, analytic techniques and ethical considerations. (Formerly CRJU 420)

  
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    CRJU 323 - Comparative Legal Systems in a Global Context

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201
    This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles and practices of non-U.S. legal systems. The course will assess historical legacies, along with origins of law and the development of key legal institutions. The intent is to foster greater comprehension of different legal systems in an interdependent world. The course will begin by examining legal systems with Western qualities, followed by an examination of legal systems not constructed on Western suppositions. Comparisons will be cross-national, and will be informed by increased knowledge of non-U.S. legal systems. Offered alternate years, fall semester. (CGCL)

  
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    CRJU 325 - Political Theory and the Justice System

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201
    This course focuses on the dynamics of political forces and the role they play in the management of crime and justice in the United States. Political theories and perspectives are examined, compared, and contrasted within the context of justice system practices, policies and outcomes. Offered alternate years.

  
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    CRJU 330 - Analyzing Criminal Justice Data

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 320 (formerly CRJU 420) and MATH 105 or higher
    This course teaches principles of statistical techniques as applied within criminal justice. By using criminal justice research problems, this course will cover topics including constructing testable research questions, organizing data, applying appropriate statistical tests and interpreting results. This course also teaches student how to evaluate government data, technical reports and empirical studies which summarize criminal justice data. (Formerly CRJU 430) (CQUR)

  
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    CRJU 331 - Police, Community and Society

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201
    This course examines the current issues and themes relating to the police and their role in communities and in society. Topics covered will include the organizational structure of police departments, police problems and issues affecting society at large, new theories of the effects of policing on crime, and the effectiveness of community policing. Offered both semesters.

  
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    CRJU 332 - History of Policing in America

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 331 or consent of instructor
    This course examines the historical development of policing in the United States and the relationship between past police practices and their modern counterparts (e.g., organization structures, police subculture issues and police-community relations). By examining the history of policing and how it functioned, students will develop a more informed perspective regarding this vital component of the criminal justice system. Offered alternate years.

  
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    CRJU 334 - White Collar Crime

    (3 credits) Cross Listed with SOCI 334
    Prerequisite: SOCI 102 and SOCI 300; or CRJU 201; or consent of instructor
    Broadening the definition of crime, this course will study the behavioral systems involved in the commission of white collar crimes in complex structures, such as government bureaucracies, multi-national corporations and underground systems. The modern institutional factors – political and social – permitting or restricting the commission of such crimes will be investigated. Specifically, the performance of the criminal justice system will be examined. Offered spring semester.

  
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    CRJU 341 - Courts and the Judicial Process

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course examines the development of the American criminal court system. The purposes, structure, functions, procedures and effects of the federal and state judicial system are studied. The course considers the roles of central actors and the decision-making process in criminal courts as well as the impact of social inequality on the structure and operation of criminal courts. Prospects for reforming criminal courts are explored.

  
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    CRJU 346 - Criminal Law and Procedure

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course examines the nature, purpose and historical development of criminal law and criminal procedure. Criminal liability and responsibility, parties to crimes, elements of various crimes, and defenses to criminal accusations are studied. The course will also examine how constitutional issues relating to arrest, search and seizure, and self-incrimination define standards of liberty. In addition, this course focuses on the ideological changes that manifest in court opinion, the implicit, or at times explicit, relationship between politics, partisanship and court behavior. (CWRT)

  
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    CRJU 347 - Restorative Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 or consent of instructor
    This course explores the philosophy of restorative justice, which includes a global set of indigenous peacemaking practices. Restorative justice emphasizes foregiveness, redemption, offender reintegration through community involvement, offender accountability and victim-offender mediation. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    CRJU 349 - Perspectives on the Holocaust

    (3 credits) Cross Listed with INTD/SCWK 349
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 or SCWK 270
    This course introduces students to an interdisciplinary approach to studies of the Holocaust. An apocalyptic event, the Holocaust provides countless opportunities for students to identify and construct central questions and then embark on a journey of critical analyses and increased understanding of this historical event. Several topics are pursued including the sociopolitical processes that permit government-led discriminatory treatment of various social groups despite their possession of citizenship; the codification of laws that legitimized the marginalization, criminalization, and the near genocide of the Jews and other groups during the ascension and the apex of Nazism in Germany and the ability of government to gain the participation of ordinary people in this coordinated effort of abuse, theft and murder. In addition, this course reviews the human experiences of resistance, resilience and the survivorship of those who remained alive and intact physically, mentally, spiritually and socially during the Holocaust. Finally, the determination of relevant applications from the study of the Holocaust to nascent social conditions and social problems occurring elsewhere in the world is undertaken. (CGCL; CMCL)

  
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    CRJU 350 - Behind the Walls: Crime and Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and consent of instructor
    This course is an opportunity for students to exchange ideas and perceptions of crime and justice with an incarcerated population. The topics discussed each semester may vary. Through dialog and writing assignments, theoretical knowledge and lived experience will be interwoven to gain a deeper understanding of crime and the criminal justice system. This course follows the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program model of teaching and is taught inside the prison walls. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester. (CMCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    CRJU 352 - Urban Crime

    (3 credits) Cross Listed with SOCI 352
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 or CRJU 202 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 103
    This course examines urban and neighborhood crime. In addition to surveying theories of urban crime, disorder, and unrest, it examines responses to urban crime, including community policing, order maintenance policing, crime prevention through environmental design, and programs to ameliorate the deeper causes of crime. The course examines the effects of inequality, racial and ethnic discrimination, substance abuse and gun violence on urban crime. Another topic covered is the drop in urban crime rates during the 1990s. Offered alternate years.

  
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    CRJU 354 - Corrections

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course is an analysis of the social and organizational structures and processes involved in dealing with individuals who have been designated as offenders of criminal law. The correctional system includes community-based corrections, institutional corrections, and issues of supervision, rehabilitation, aftercare and offender re-entry. (Formerly SOCI 354)

  
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    CRJU 358 - Race, Class, Crime and Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course examines the effects of class and race on justice outcomes. Historical and contemporary practices of the system are evaluated for disparate or discriminatory patterns. Offered once yearly. (CMCL)

  
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    CRJU 359 - Technology and Crime Control

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202 and six additional credits in criminal justice courses
    This course examines how changes in technology create new forms of crime, as well as modes of apprehension, detection and prevention. Additionally, the course will examine the “outsourcing” of surveillance by the states and the federal government to private corporate data miners. Offered alternate years.

  
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    CRJU 369 - Gender, Crime and Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202; or consent of instructor
    This interdisciplinary course will explore how females experience crime, justice, and the criminal justice system differently than do males. Through a comparative historical lens, we will explore legal, philosophical, psychological, sociological and political perspectives on crime and justice. This course will use a gendered perspective in examining the roots of violence against women in our society, specifically addressing femicide, intimate partner violence, and sexual assault. We will then examine the difference between women and men as offenders, including theories of offending, agency and types of offenses committed. Particular emphasis will be given to incarceration alternatives, including restorative justice programs. (CMCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    CRJU 371 - Sex Crimes

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201
    This course explores the historical evolution of sex crimes. Topics include the age of consent, prostitution, anti-sodomy laws, stranger rape, date rape and sex-offender registration. The course will also examine the impact of sexual assault on victims and offenders, as well as the criminal justice system’s response and the role of policymakers and advocacy groups in the formulation and enforcement of sex crime laws.

  
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    CRJU 372 - Terrorism and Civil Liberties

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201
    The focus of this course is the ongoing conflict between preventing terrorism and compromising constitutional freedoms. This course will examine the enhanced powers of police agencies and federal prosecutors. Students will survey the effects of these new powers, particularly with regard to changes in due process standards and evidentiary requirements. Students will also be provided with historical examples of previous national security efforts to protect the public.

  
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    CRJU 381 - Privatization in Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201
    This course will examine the many controversies around the reemergence of private prisons as well as the explosive growth of private police in the United States. Offered alternate years.

  
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    CRJU 385 - Victimology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course involves the study of victimization by drawing on scientific and other literature that analyzes these experiences, impacts and consequences on crime victims, justice system policies and practices, and the law.

  
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    CRJU 388 - Hate Crime

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 410
    Crime that is committed as a result of bigotry is commonly referred to as hate crime. This course examines the political and social significance of these crime events. In addition, this course reviews theories of prejudice, the role of youth subcultures in the development of the neo-Nazi skinhead movement, typologies of hate groups, motives, hate crime victimology, recruitment strategies of hate groups, hate speech and correctional responses.

  
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    CRJU 399 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Dependent on topic
    Various special topics of current interest in criminal justice will be offered from time to time. Topics will be announced before registration. May be taken more than once but only three credits will be counted toward the first 30 hours in the criminal justice major.

  
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    CRJU 404 - Media, Justice and Crime

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and an additional three-credit criminal justice course
    This course is a survey of how various media institutions (newspapers, magazines, talk radio, network television, cable, film and Internet-based products) and formats (news, entertainment and infotainment) shape the representation and public perception of dangerousness, criminality, police activity and ultimately, the direction of contemporary social policy. Offered alternate years, spring semester.

  
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    CRJU 406 - Ethics and the Criminal Justice System

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course examines a wide range of ethical and moral issues in the field of criminal justice. Topics covered include the use of harm to prevent harm, the use of discretionary decision-making, prediction problems and moral dilemmas that confront various justice agents, e.g., police, prosecutors, defense attorneys and correctional officers. Teleological and deontological ethical systems are examined and used to measure the moral worth of practitioner actions in the criminal justice system. Offered once a year.

  
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    CRJU 410 - Applied Theory and Crime Policy

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 320 (formerly 420) and CRJU 330 (formerly 430) and CRJU 331 and CRJU 341 and CRJU 354 and CRJU 406
    This course utilizes an applied approach in examining theories of crime causation in light of criminal justice aims. The criminal justice system responds to crime and criminals based on explicit and implicit theories of causation. Building on the analysis and skills acquired from our research methods and data analysis courses, students will examine the validity of crime theories and correlated interventions. Additional attention will be paid to the associate policy implications. (CWRM)

  
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    CRJU 415 - Police Culture

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course will introduce students to the study of the organizational culture of law enforcement. Specifically, students will encounter a rich, diverse and burgeoning literature on police culture, as they read a number of first-person accounts drawn from ethnographic fieldwork. They will explore vexing and contentious issues such as the misuse of force, official corruption and the militarization of policing in the 21st  century.

 

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