Aug 18, 2022  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

English

  
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    ENGL 204 - Responding to Writing

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and consent of the Director of the Writing Studio
    This course teaches students to negotiate the demands of responding to writers and their work face-to-face and one-on-one, with an emphasis on collaborative learning techniques, writing processes, interpersonal dynamics and rhetorical analysis. This course is repeatable for up to three credits.

  
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    ENGL 205 - Supporting Second Language Learners

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and consent of the director of Second Language Services
    This one-credit course teaches students how to effectively support second language learners in one-on-one sessions and in small groups, with the emphasis on collaborative learning techniques, language learning as a process and contrastive rhetoric. Students will explore major theoretical approaches to second language acquisition, discuss the role of cross-cultural differences in second language discourse, and develop effective language support strategies to use in one-on-one and/or small group setting. The course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits.

  
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    ENGL 206 - Sustainability: Reading and Writing the Environment

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Writers from the beginning of history have sought to understand and shape the relationship between people and the world they inhabit. In our own time, the sustainability of this relationship has emerged as one of humanity’s central issues. Students in this course will read from some of this vast literature and use writing to explore their own relationship to the environment we share. Areas of focus might include different traditions of nature writing; key figures in ecological writing like Thoreau, Muir, Leopold and Carson; the idea of wilderness; evolving attitudes towards animals; the literature of food; or the writing of specific places. Students can expect to read widely and write at least fifteen pages of prose in a variety of critical, creative and research modes. Offered annually. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 211 - Literary Classics of Western Civilization to 1600

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Major works of Western literature from ancient times through the Renaissance are studied. The course encompasses diverse literary forms and themes through such works as the Bible, Homeric epic, Greek drama, and The Divine Comedy. (CGCL; CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 214 - The Classical Tradition

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Major Greek and Roman writers in Modern English translation are studied. Included will be such figures as Homer, Sophocles, Plato and Euripides. (CGCL; CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 221 - Major British Writers to 1800

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Representative works by major British writers from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century are studied, including such figures as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, Pope and Swift. (Satisfies English Literature before 1800 area requirement. Credits only applied once.) (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 222 - Major British Writers since 1800

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Representative works by major British writers of the 19th and 20th centuries are studied, including such figures as Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, Dickens, Shaw, Yeats, Eliot, Woolf and Joyce. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 223 - Survey of British Literature to 1800

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102; open to English majors and minors only
    This survey course will acquaint English majors and minors with key literary texts from the Anglo-Saxon, medieval, Renaissance and 18th century periods. Students will study literary historical periods, the development of literary forms and genres, and the historical and cultural contexts informing these writers’ world views. This course will investigate the self-image of the island nation that established one of the world’s greatest empires. Writers may include Bede, the Beowulf Poet, the Gawain Poet, Julian of Norwich, Chaucer, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Donne, Marvell, Milton, Haywood, Pope and Swift.

  
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    ENGL 226 - Writing about Writing

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    As the gateway course to the Writing and Writing Studies concentration and minor, this course introduces students to writing as a subject of inquiry. Students explore their own experiences with writing, read landmark research on writing, investigate topics related to writing, and learn more about opportunities for writing and writing research at BSU and beyond.

  
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    ENGL 227 - Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or consent of instructor
    Class members will study the art and craft of creative nonfiction writing through the reading and discussion of published creative nonfiction and creative nonfiction written by students. The goal of this course is to improve writing through careful reading and refection, thoughtful discussion of and written response to student produced creative nonfiction. May be repeated once for credit.

  
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    ENGL 228 - Fiction Writing Workshop

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Class members will study the art and craft of fiction writing through the reading and discussion of published stories and stories written by students. The goal of this course is to improve writing through careful reading and refection, thoughtful discussion of and written responses to student produced fiction. This course may be repeated once for credit.

  
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    ENGL 229 - Poetry Writing Workshop

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Class members will study the art and craft of poetry writing through the reading and discussion of published poems and poems written by students. The goal of this course is to improve writing through careful reading and refection, thoughtful discussion of and written responses to student produced poetry. This course may be repeated once for credit.

  
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    ENGL 230 - Creative Writing

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    In this course, students experiment in multiple genres in a workshop setting addressing issues of craft, form and style. Students will practice critical response to student and external models.

  
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    ENGL 231 - Major American Writers to 1865

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Representative works by major American writers from the 17th century through the Civil War are studied. Included are such figures as Franklin, Wheatley, Poe, Emerson, Douglass, Hawthorne, Melville and Whitman. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 232 - Major American Writers since 1865

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Major American writers from the Civil War to the present are studied including such figures as Twain, Dickinson, James, Frost, Hemingway and Faulkner. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 233 - Introduction to the African-American Novel

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    African-Americans have distinguished themselves artistically in many modes of expression, but perhaps none as profoundly as the novel. Tracing the development of this tradition that began before slavery’s end, students will read the works of writers such as Hannah Crafts, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Alice Walker and Toni Morrison. The course will present these novels not only in their historical and cultural contexts but also in the evolving narrative tradition of African-American writers. Students will understand better how the human questions posed by familiar American authors are also explored by African-American novelists. (CHUM; CMCL; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 234 - Survey of American Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102; open to English majors and minors only
    This survey course will acquaint English majors with key American literary texts and literary-historical periods (colonial, early republican, romantic, realist, naturalist, modernist and postmodernist). Examining literature in the context of 400 years of cultural and historical change, the course will investigate constructions of U.S. national identity as well as changes in literary conventions. Writers may include Bradstreet, Rowlandson, Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Hughes, Stein, Hemingway, Faulkner, Morrison, Pynchon and Alexie.

  
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    ENGL 241 - Shakespeare

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays is set against the background of his time and includes a detailed study of representative tragedies, comedies and histories. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 251 - Literary Themes

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Major literary texts are examined from the perspective of a common theme. In a given semester the course might concern itself with love, the family, madness, law, nature (as examples of particular themes) to illustrate how writers from diverse cultures and/or historical periods working with different genres shape imaginative responses to enduring themes. This course may be repeated for different topics. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 252 - Literary Types

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Major literary texts are examined from the perspective of one genre or type and focus in a given semester on the novel, drama, poetry, short story and biography. Works from diverse cultures and/or historical periods will be used to illustrate how conventions of type or genre shape a writer’s discourse. This course may be repeated for different topics. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 253 - Non-Western Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course introduces the student to the fiction, poetry and drama of the non-Western world. The works to be studied are chosen both for their literary qualities and for insight into different social contexts and cultural conditions. (CGCL; CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 254 - Literature for Elementary Education Majors

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Literary texts from diverse cultures and historical periods will be examined in the context of either a common theme or a single literary genre. Representative works for British, American and world literature in translation will be used to practice techniques of close reading and to develop an understanding both of literary form and technique. Special attention will be given to the manner in which literature reflects the beliefs and values of its historical context. The student will learn various ways of talking and writing about literature. (Designed for non-English major elementary education students.) (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 255 - East Asian Literature in Translation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    The course is a writing-intensive seminar designed to introduce students to a variety of texts by East Asian authors. Students will gain insight into other cultures through the examination and analysis of literary works from China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Cambodia, and the Philippines. (CGCL; CHUM; CMCL; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 261 - Film Study: Introduction to the Art

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Major American and foreign films and directors from the silent era to the present are evaluated to develop critical awareness and esthetic appreciation of film as an art form. In addition, film viewing, readings in film theory, interpretation and criticism are required. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 262 - Film Study: Literature and Film

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    A cross-disciplinary study of film and literature, this course will develop an understanding of the various aesthetic and narrative demands of both forms of representation. Potential topics may include cinematic techniques adopted by writers, literary devices in film narrative, point of view and perspective, singular versus collaborative authorship and adaptations of literature into film. Viewing and reading works in both media will be required. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 269 - Topics in Children’s Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Focusing on genre, period, author or topic, this writing intensive course allows students to gain an in-depth knowledge of a field or particular body of texts within children’s literature, including relevant critical histories. Areas of inquiry might include form and aesthetics, historical and cultural backgrounds, intertexuality, gender and sexuality, class, race and constructions of disability and able-bodiedness. Offered annually. (CHUM; CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 270 - Reading Film Language

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course introduces students to the art of cinema through viewings of films that represent various styles, genres, historical moments and national traditions. Students will become familiar with technical concepts including cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing and sound, and will learn how to perform formal, ideological and narrative analysis of film texts. In addition to film viewing, readings in film criticism and film theory will also be assigned. Offered every year.

  
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    ENGL 280 - The Journalistic Essay

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course focuses on the journalistic essay - a genre that incorporates journalistic research methods (reporting) and literary writing techniques. Students read published journalistic essays, are introduced to reporting methods (such as identifying a news story and interviewing), and write a series of journalistic essays based on primary research. Projects may include feature stories, travel essays, profiles, and other human interest pieces. (CWRT)

  
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    ENGL 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and consent of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in English allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered fall semester.

  
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    ENGL 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and consent of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in English allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered spring semester.

  
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    ENGL 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    ENGL 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    ENGL 300 - Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

    (3 credits)
    Designed for prospective teachers and students interested in international careers, this course introduces the field of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). The course explores current research in second language acquisition and connects it to different teaching contexts, including teaching English as a second language at the secondary level, inclusive ESL methodologies in the mainstream classes, workplace ESL and teaching English abroad. Special attention is paid to the issues of identity construction, language ownership and creative expression in a second language. Offered every other year. (Formerly LANG 330)

  
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    ENGL 301 - Writing and the Teaching of Writing

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Designed for prospective teachers, the course undertakes an investigation of current research in the writing process and in writing pedagogy with application made to the student’s own writing, school curriculum and effective teaching practice.

  
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    ENGL 303 - Writing Our Heritages

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    In this course students investigate their family stories, migrations and heritages using field, archival, genealogical and library research, as well as oral histories, family photos and artifacts, and draw from these materials as well as their own life experiences to compose a variety of writing projects. Students also read essays and memoirs that explore the connections among identity, family history, landscape and heritage. Offered every other year.

  
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    ENGL 304 - Classical Mythology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course explores the mythology of Classical Greece and Rome with a focus on the literary accounts of gods and heroes. The course will offer a who’s who of the ancient imaginative world, study the main ancient sources of well known stories, and introduce approaches to the study of mythology. The course will also give attention to the afterlife of classical mythology in later literature, the visual arts and popular culture. Offered annually.

  
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    ENGL 305 - History of the English Language

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course considers the development of English from its Indo-European origins to its present status as a de facto international language. It traces the historical, literary and philological features of English in the Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Norman, Early Modern and Modern periods; special attention is also paid to the developments of American English as well as to the different varieties of English spoken around the globe.

  
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    ENGL 306 - Sagas of the Icelanders

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This is a course of study incorporating the literature and cultural history of medieval Iceland. The course addresses several important authors and texts (including Snorri Sturluson, the Eddas, Heimskringla, Njals saga, Hrafnkels saga and others) from an interdisciplinary perspective that includes elements of history, cultural anthropology and literary study.

  
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    ENGL 309 - Early American Literature, Beginnings to 1820

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234 or consent of instructor
    This course begins with the first colonization of the Americas and stretches beyond the Revolution to the early national period and the beginnings of Romanticism. The full range of early American writing is covered, including poetry, drama, fiction and autobiography, as well as English-language texts of Native Americans. Authors such as Anne Bradstreet, Olaudah Equiano, Benjamin Franklin and Washington Irving will be explored.

  
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    ENGL 312 - Modern British Fiction

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    This course focuses on earlier 20th-century British fiction writers such as Conrad, Forster, Lawrence, Joyce and Woolf.

  
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    ENGL 314 - Medieval English Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    Selected readings in non-Chaucerian writing: Langland, Gower, romance, lyrics, drama.

  
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    ENGL 315 - Ethnic American Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    This course will focus on American writers representing a diverse range of racial, ethnic, economic, cultural, political and historical perspectives. In addition to identifying and discussing literary terms and techniques, we will examine a number of literary genres. We will explore concepts and themes such as immigration and assimilation, family dynamics, the intersections of race, gender, class and sexuality and the relationship between personal and political realms. The reading list may include writers such as Sherman Alexie, Julia Alvarez, David Henry Hwang, and Jamaica Kincaid.

  
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    ENGL 317 - African-American Literature I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234; or consent of instructor
    Students will survey writings in African-American literature form its inception through 1954, the year of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling that outlawed segregation. Studying distinguished writers of poetry, drama, essays, narratives and prose fiction, students will attend to the historical, cultural and political contexts in which the works were produced.

  
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    ENGL 318 - African-American Literature II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234; or consent of instructor
    Many of the freedoms and rights that African-Americans enjoy today began with the historic 1954 Brown vs Board of Education ruling that outlawed segregation. Starting with this pivotal time in American history and continuing to the present, students will survey African-American poetry, drama, essays, narratives and prose fiction with close attention paid to their historical, political and cultural contexts.

  
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    ENGL 320 - Chaucer

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    This course provides an introduction to Chaucer’s poetry and Middle English through readings in The Canterbury Tales.

  
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    ENGL 321 - British Literature in the Age of Enlightenment I, 1660-1740

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    This course explores the literary cultures that emerged in the wake of the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660. Attention to historical context, such as the introduction of women onto the stage and the glamorization of criminal subcultures like pirates and highwaymen, will deepen our understanding of writings by authors such as Aphra Behn, Jonathan Swift, Eliza Haywood and Daniel Defoe.

  
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    ENGL 322 - British Literature in the Age of Enlightenment II, 1740-1800

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    This course examines the writings of authors such as Samuel Richardson, Frances Burney, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Olaudah Equiano and Jane Austen. We will consider how literary modes such as sentimentalism and the Gothic participate in and respond to major intellectual, social, scientific, political and cultural developments of the Enlightenment period.

  
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    ENGL 323 - Introduction to Linguistics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    The course introduces phonology, phonetics, syntax, semantics, and linguistic variation and change as applied to the English language.

  
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    ENGL 324 - Language and Society

    (3 credits)
    The course explores topics in sociolinguistics, including regional and social dialects; gender-specific difference in language use; language change; cross-linguistic borrowing; language birth, death and revival; bilingualism and multilingualism in societies and on the individual level. Special attention is paid to language policies and planning. The course draws examples from English and a variety of other languages. Travel may be required as part of this course. Offered every other year. (Formerly LANG 324) (CHUM; CMCL)

  
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    ENGL 325 - Cultural Rhetorics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    In this course, the particular focus will be on cultural rhetorics: the intersections of rhetorics, cultures and power. Rhetoric has often been defined in terms of persuasion, and this course will utilize and challenge that definition. Students will begin by analyzing the space from which they operate and make meaning, and how that space has the power to shape perceptions. Students will read and write about rhetorical constructions such as race, ethnicity, culture, sexuality, ability, gender and class. They will investigate a variety of texts including digital, material, visual, performance and popular culture. Offered annually.

  
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    ENGL 326 - Native American Writing and Rhetoric

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and ENGL 203
    This course will examine a variety of writings by Native Americans from different periods and regions. Drawing on the vast range of native cultures and their many rhetorical forms, from traditional oral literatures to political documents to novels, films and poems, the course will explore how native writers have contributed to the ongoing effort to preserve cultural, political and rhetorical sovereignty in the face of colonial ideologies. Writers may include Samson Occom, William Apess, Zitkala-Sa, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, Sherman Alexie, Scott Richard Lyons, Vine Deloria, Jr, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Joy Harjo and Robert Warrior. Offered annually.

  
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    ENGL 327 - Women Writers: The Female Tradition to 1900

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course traces the history and development of a female literary tradition among English-speaking women writers. The dominant stages, images and themes and genres within this tradition will be explored through the work of writers such as Bradstreet, Killigrew, Wheatley, Wollstonecraft, Dickinson, Eliot, Browning, Rossetti, Gilman and Chopin.

  
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    ENGL 329 - Modern American Fiction

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    This course examines American fiction from 1900 to 1945, an era in which writers moved from the tradition of realistic fiction to the radical reinvention of literature in an effort to grapple with technological change, transformations in gender and racial norms and the traumas of World War I and the Great Depression. Authors studied might include Kate Chopin, Jack London, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Zora Neal Hurston, William Faulkner and John Steinbeck.

  
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    ENGL 330 - Recent American Fiction

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    Fiction from 1945 to the present addresses the key themes of recent American culture: the psychological toll of modern global warfare, America as a multi-ethnic nation, assimilation and disillusionment with the American dream, shifting gender roles, the effects of the Civil Rights movement, postmodern dislocation and meaninglessness, suburban malaise, the spread of consumer capitalism and a relaxation of the boundaries between high and low culture. Authors studied might include Flannery O’Connor, Saul Bellow, James Baldwin, Thomas Pynchon, Toni Morrison, Don DeLillo and Sherman Alexie.

  
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    ENGL 331 - U.S. Literature in the 19th Century I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    The era from 1800-1865 was filled with calls for distinctly American literature, and the responses were as varied and ambitious as the new nation itself. Writers celebrated the frontier and developed transcendentalism; wrote sentimental best sellers, twisted gothic tales and fery abolitionist tracts; brought the novel to unparalleled philosophical depth and invented modern poetry. Authors studied might include James Fenimore Cooper, Edgar Alan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville and Emily Dickinson.

  
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    ENGL 332 - U.S. Literature in the 19th Century II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    The later part of the nineteenth century saw a nation shattered by civil war become one of the great powers in the world. American literature of this era is shaped by - and helped shape - this process. Short stories, novels, poetry and, eventually, film provided a crucial forum for Americans to forge a new national consensus after the Civil War, to negotiate the role race, class, ethnicity and gender would play in their culture, and to define their identity as an industrial power with a worldwide empire. Authors studied might include Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Charles Chesnutt, Sarah Orne Jewett, Edith Wharton, Stephen Crane and Henry James.

  
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    ENGL 333 - Realism and Naturalism

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    At the turn of the century, American literature reflects the decline of rural life and the rise of the city. The growth of industry and mechanization led to questions about human nature and democratic values. The consequent human experiences of displacement, alienation and injustice can be seen in the literature from Howells to Wright.

  
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    ENGL 335 - Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223; or consent of instructor
    This course involves reading and discussion of a number of plays by contemporaries of Shakespeare such as Jonson, Marlowe and Webster with attention to contemporary social developments as well as to the historical development of the English play.

  
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    ENGL 336 - American Modernism

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    Focusing on literature and culture produced in the United States between 1890 and 1945, this course explores the cultural sensibility of “modernism”. This course will examine the shared aesthetic and thematic concerns of producers of fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction manifestos, art and film in this period, as they presented their work as a break from 19th century values and artistic modes. The course will pay particular attention to the historical contexts that catalyzed the modernist movement and key recurring themes in modernist culture. Figures studied may include Hemingway, Gilman, Eliot, Larsen, O’Neill, Anderson, Faulkner, Williams, Stevens, Cather, Hopper and Stein.

  
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    ENGL 340 - Literature of the English Renaissance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    This course examines the non-dramatic literature of the Age of Shakespeare including the works of Sidney, Spenser, Nashe, Marlowe and Drayton. Textual analysis is emphasized, but the historical, social and cultural background of this period is also considered.

  
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    ENGL 341 - Literature of the Continental Renaissance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    This course surveys representative works of Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Erasmus, Castiglione, Rabelais, Cellini, Montaigne, Cervantes and Ronsard representing prevailing literary themes and techniques.

  
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    ENGL 342 - Shakespeare: Histories and Comedies

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223; or consent of instructor
    This course provides examples of Shakespeare’s art in dominant Renaissance dramatic forms and with some of his recurring thematic concerns. In addition, study of the histories and comedies demonstrates Shakespeare’s growth in the dramatic use of language. Plays for study will include The Comedy of Errors, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Richard III, Richard II, Henry IV, Parts I and II and Henry V.

  
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    ENGL 343 - Shakespeare: Tragedies and Late Plays

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223; or consent of instructor
    Study of the late plays provides the student with examples of dramatic works that proceed beyond the tragic dimension. Selected plays will include Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest.

  
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    ENGL 344 - Young Adult Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course explores the wide range of literature written for young adults, with a focus both on how this literature addresses the developmental needs of adolescents and on the different genres and cultural perspectives offered by different texts. Topics may include history of young adult literature, issues of censorship, gender, ideology and popular culture. Offered annually.

  
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    ENGL 346 - Southern Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    This course focuses on the personal, cultural, and social dimensions of southern literature in works by William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O’Connor, Eudora Welty, Alice Walker and William Styron.

  
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    ENGL 350 - Recent British Fiction

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    This course focuses on British fiction since 1945. Writers to be studied may include Golding, Graves, Lessing, Murdoch, Greene, Ballard and Powell.

  
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    ENGL 354 - 20th-Century British Drama

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The course surveys British drama from Oscar Wilde to the present. Attention may be given to the crucial role that continental dramatists such as Ibsen, Chekhov and Brecht played in re-energizing the British Theater. There will be emphasis on plays from the modern period as well as contemporary works. Playwrights studied may include Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, John Osborne, Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard and Caryl Churchill.

  
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    ENGL 355 - International Study Tour

    (3 credits)
    This short-term international course offers students first-hand exposure to sites of cultural importance associated with diverse literary traditions, writing practices, and the study of language use in various settings around the world. Topics and destinations will vary, but may include linguistic diversity and multiculturalism in Hawaii, East Asian literature in China, travel writing in London, multilingualism and multiculturalism in Paris, among others. Each faculty-led course includes on-campus pre-departure sessions, lectures and activities at an international destination, and post-departure sessions at BSU. Contact the Department of English or the Office of Study Abroad for current study course details. This course may be repeated twice for a maximum of nine credits with different itineraries and course topics. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
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    ENGL 356 - Modern American Drama

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234; or consent of instructor
    From social dramas and morality plays to the theater of the absurd, modern drama develops a range of themes and techniques reflective of the age. Focus will be on such playwrights as Odets, Wilder, Saroyan, O’Neill, Hellman, Williams, Hansberry, Miller, Baldwin and Albee.

  
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    ENGL 357 - Recent American Drama

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    The experimentation in contemporary American plays will be explored in such writers as Mamet, Howe, Rabe, Wasserstein, Norman, Shepard, Guare, Henley, Wilson, Hwang and McNally.

  
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    ENGL 360 - The English Novel I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The course traces the development of the English novel from Defoe to Austin and includes writers such as Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne and Scott.

  
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    ENGL 361 - The English Novel II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The course traces the development of the English novel from Austen to Hardy and includes such writers as Dickens, the Brontës, Thackeray, Eliot, Trollope and Conrad.

  
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    ENGL 365 - Victorian Prose and Poetry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The major emphasis is placed on the poetry of Tennyson, Browning and Arnold, but the works of other 19th century poets such as Hopkins and Hardy will also be read and discussed. The essays of Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Newman, Huxley and others are studied in conjunction with the poetry.

  
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    ENGL 367 - English Literature of the Late Victorian and Edwardian Periods

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The major writers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries are examined from aesthetic, social and intellectual vantage points, with readings in such prose writers as Gissing, James, Wilde, Beerbohm, Carroll, Wells, Hardy, Corvo, Forster and Conrad and such poets as Rossetti, Swinburne, Morris, Hopkins and Yeats.

  
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    ENGL 370 - 17th-Century Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The course is an introduction to the prose and poetry of the 17th century in England, exclusive of Milton. Such writers as Donne, Jonson, Bacon, Burton, Browne and Dryden will be examined, and various persistent elements, such as the classical influence, will be explored.

  
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    ENGL 371 - Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 227 or consent of instructor
    This course will provide students with the opportunity for the intense study of the art and craft of creative nonfiction writing. Students will submit creative nonfiction for peer critique in addition to reading and discussing published works.

  
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    ENGL 372 - Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 228 or consent of instructor
    This course offers an intense study of the art and craft of fiction writing. Students will submit fiction for peer critique and develop a body of revised work that Writing Concentration students may include in their portfolios. This course may be repeated once for credit.

  
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    ENGL 377 - Post-Colonial Literature and Theory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    This course traces the development of post-colonial literature and theory. Questions that will be addressed include: What constitutes post-coloniality? How do post-colonial literature and theories illuminate relationships between imperialism, power, race, gender and class? Readings for the course may contain pieces from multiple genres. Representative authors include Joseph Conrad, Salman Rushdie, Marguerite Duras and Derek Walcott.
     

  
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    ENGL 378 - Bible as Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Various portions of both the Hebrew and Christian Bible will be studied with the primary focus on the literary forms and conventions of Biblical writing. Attention will be given to the various forms of narration within the Bible in order to attain an understanding of how the various styles and genres of Biblical writing function. Significant time will be devoted to studying responses to the Bible - literary, theoretical, philosophical and artistic. Offered annually.

  
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    ENGL 380 - Milton

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The course includes the main works of Milton: Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes, the minor poetic works, and selected prose.

  
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    ENGL 381 - Irish Literature I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The course is a survey of earlier Irish literature in translation from the Gaelic and in English. It includes selections from the epic poem, Tain Bo Cuailnge; Gaelic lyric poetry (600-1800 A.D.); the pioneering fiction of Maria Edgeworth and William Carleton; and the poetry of the 19th-century balladeers, Thomas Moore, Thomas Davis, James Clarence Managan and Sir Samuel Ferguson; the accomplishments of the Irish literary revival of 1890-1920; fiction by Daniel Corkery, George Moore, Seamus O’Kelly and James Joyce; poetry and plays by William Butler Yeats; and plays by John M. Synge.

  
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    ENGL 382 - Irish Literature II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    This course is a survey of later modern and contemporary Irish literature including the later fiction of James Joyce and the later poetry of William Butler Yeats; the plays of Sean O’Casey, Brendan Behan, Samuel Beckett and Brian Friel; the poetry of Austin Clarke, Patrick Kavanagh, Thomas Kinsella, John Montague, Richard Murphy and Seamus Heaney; the fiction of Liam O’Flaherty, Sean O’Faolain, Frank O’Connor, Flann O’Brien, Mary Lavin, William Trevor, Edna O’Brien and others.

  
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    ENGL 386 - English Romantic Poets

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The course examines selected poetry and prose of writers such as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley and Keats with the principal objective of understanding the character and modes of expression of each poet’s imaginative vision. Consideration is given to historical background and to developments in philosophy and aesthetic theory which have a direct bearing on Romantic poetry.

  
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    ENGL 388 - Topics in Film

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course will explore topics in film study, varying from semester to semester. Topics may include film directors or auteurs, genres (e.g. French New Wave), time periods (e.g. early silent pictures), film theory (e.g. psychoanalytic) or socio-historical topics (e.g. race or gender in film; war films and national identity). This course may be repeated for different topics. Offered once per year.

  
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    ENGL 389 - Topics in Writing

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    The course explores writing on different subjects from semester to semester according to interest and demand. Recent topics include genre theory, writing assessment, memoir and heritage, and indigenous rhetorics. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
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    ENGL 390 - Theories of Writing

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    The course introduces students to theories of writing emerging from research in the field of composition and rhetoric. Students will look at a variety of ways in which writing, writing processes and writing pedagogies have been viewed, discussed, contested and taught.

  
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    ENGL 391 - Modern Literary Criticism

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course examines the major critics and critical movements of the 20th century, particularly in the United States and England, but with some attention to continental critical thought. Critics and theorists such as T.S. Eliot, I.A. Richards, John Crowe Ransom, Edmund Wilson, Lionel Trilling, Northrop Frye, Raymond Williams and Roland Barthes are studied. The principles and methods of several kinds of criticism – formalist, Marxist, psycho-analytical, structuralist and post-structuralist – are examined.

  
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    ENGL 392 - Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 229 or consent of instructor
    This course offers an intensive workshop approach to poetry writing for students who wish to submit poems for peer review and develop a poetry portfolio. This course may be repeated once for credit.

  
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    ENGL 393 - Modern British Poetry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223
    The major British poets of the 20th century are studied with particular emphasis on the works of Hopkins, Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Auden and Thomas.

  
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    ENGL 395 - Studies in Recent American Poetry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234
    American poets practicing from 1945 to the present are surveyed. Among these poets may be Robert Lowell, John Berryman, Theodore Roethke, Richard Wilbur, Adrienne Rich, Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, James Wright, Richard Hugo, Randall Jarrell, Gwendolyn Brooks, Robert Hayden and Gary Snyder. Others may be included from time to time.

  
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    ENGL 396 - Rhetoric and Style

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    In this course, students read critical essays on rhetorical theory as well as a variety of texts, exploring the effectiveness of the writers’ stylistic moves in relation to rhetorical issues, such as goals, audience and genre. Students will apply this knowledge of rhetoric and style to their own writings through a series of writing projects.

  
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    ENGL 399 - Topics in Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    This course explores literature on different topics from semester to semester according to interest and demand. Possible topics may include The Bible as Literature, Irish American Literature, Transcendentalism, or The Literature of Aging. This course is repeatable with different topics.

  
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    ENGL 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students and ENGL 102
    In this course, one-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the departmental honors committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    ENGL 489 - Advanced Portfolio Workshop

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 and one 300 level writing course
    This course serves as the culmination of the writing concentration. Students will demonstrate, through the creation of a portfolio of work, their facility in writing within the genres relevant to their professional goals. Additionally, students will frame their writing practice theoretically as well as investigate the steps related to publication and entrance into writing professions.

  
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    ENGL 490 - Literary Studies in Oxford

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102; students will normally be expected to be in their junior or senior year
    Close readings of several major works emphasizing the dynamic relationship between literary texts and the cultural and intellectual environments in which they were created. Authors and periods studied will vary. (This is a special program in England at Oxford University during July. Additional fees are required.) May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    ENGL 491 - Literary Studies in Sligo, Ireland

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102
    Students will engage in the intensive study of topics in Irish literature and culture in Sligo, near the home of William Butler Yeats and other key figures in Irish culture. This course will combine lectures, cultural events and field trips. Authors and periods will vary. (This is a special summer program in Sligo at St. Angela’s National University. Additional fees are required.)

  
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    ENGL 493 - Seminar: Writing Studies

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and ENGL 226 and six credits selected from the following: ENGL 200, ENGL 201, ENGL 202, ENGL 204, ENGL 227, ENGL 228, ENGL 229, ENGL 230, ENGL 280, ENGL 301, ENGL 302, ENGL 303, ENGL 324, ENGL 326, ENGL 371, ENGL 372, ENGL 389, ENGL 390, ENGL 392, ENGL 396, ENGL 499
    This seminar gives students in the Writing and Writing Studies concentration and minor the opportunity for in-depth study on a selected topic in composition studies and research methods used in this field. Offered either semester. (CWRM)

  
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    ENGL 494 - Seminar: Special Topics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and ENGL 203 and 12 additional credits in the major
    The seminar gives advanced English majors the opportunity for an in-depth study of selected topics in language and literature. Students are expected to demonstrate a proficiency in interpretation and analysis as well as a familiarity with critical theory and major scholarship relating to the seminar topic through close reading, class discussion, oral presentations, and at least one carefully documented scholarly paper. May be taken for graduate-level credit. (CWRM)

  
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    ENGL 495 - Seminar: British Literature and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 223 and 12 additional credits in the major
    The seminar gives advanced English majors the opportunity for an in-depth study of selected authors and topics in British and Commonwealth literature and culture. Students are expected to demonstrate a proficiency in interpretation and literary analysis as well as a familiarity with critical theory and major scholarship relating to the seminar topic through close reading, class discussion, oral presentations and at least one carefully documented scholarly paper. May be taken for graduate-level credit. (CWRM)

  
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    ENGL 496 - Seminar: American Literature and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ENGL 203 and ENGL 234 and 12 additional credits in the major
    The seminar gives advanced English majors the opportunity for an in-depth study of selected authors and topics in American literature and culture. Students are expected to demonstrate a proficiency in interpretation and literary analysis as well as a familiarity with critical theory and major scholarship relating to the seminar topic through close reading, class discussion, oral presentations, and at least one carefully documented scholarly paper. May be taken for graduate-level credit. (CWRM)

 

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