Apr 19, 2024  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Management

  
  • MGMT 520 - Sales and Sales Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 507 and MGMT 509; or waiver upon admission
    This course puts the student in the role of a prospective sales manager. The objective is to provide students with the knowledge of sales concepts and management methodologies needed to perform the role of sales manager effectively. The course enables students to apply the important concepts in selling products and services. The course also includes the organization and management of the sales function to include sales representative selection, training and development, motivation and performance assessment. Development and implementation of sales strategies are additional concepts introduced to students.

  
  • MGMT 526 - Project Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 500 and MGMT 509; or waiver upon acceptance
    This course presents a unified framework for managing multi-disciplinary and cross-functional project teams. Students learn about systems for contract and cost management, and for controlling project schedules, budgets and quality. The management of people as sources of knowledge and creativity provides a special emphasis. Students work in teams to prepare complete project plans.

  
  • MGMT 530 - Global Business Issues

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 507 and MGMT 509; or waiver upon acceptance
    Today’s increasingly interconnected and global business environment requires that managers have a solid understanding of the different geographic regions, cultures, religions and governments that exist around the world. This course will prepare students for the challenges necessary to engage in the global marketplace. Among the topics to be explored are: globalization and its driving forces,  national differences in political economy and legal systems, differences in culture and business ethics, regional economic integration such as the EU and NAFTA, the organization of international business, modes of foreign entry and strategic alliances, international business operations, including exporting, importing, overseas manufacturing and global human resource management.

  
  • MGMT 536 - Global Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509 or waiver upon acceptance
    This course focuses on cultural diversity and the importance of history, demographics, geography, resource location, human values and expectations to the businesses in the global economy. The influence of religion, social norms, political and economic systems on shaping business relationships between multinational organizations and host countries is examined in depth through case studies, research projects, group discussions and presentations.

  
  • MGMT 545 - Consumer and Buyer Behavior

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 507 or waiver upon acceptance
    This course uses concepts from the behavioral sciences for identifying market segments, predicting customer response to alternative marketing strategies, developing marketing strategies for specific consumer markets, and modeling consumer decision making. Theories and applied research from marketing and the social sciences are considered to enable marketers to better understand customers and meet their needs. Key course concepts include decision process of buyers, factors affecting purchasing decisions and customer satisfaction. Implications for marketing strategies (e.g., market segmentation, product design and promotion) are examined.

  
  • MGMT 550 - Communications for Managers

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509
    This course applies technical skills and necessary theoretical knowledge of communication arts to specific business situations. Topics include contemporary managerial writing, technologically mediated communications, interpersonal and group communication strategies.

  
  • MGMT 555 - Marketing Management

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 507
    Students will learn about the universal applications of marketing concepts to consumer, business and government markets, profit and nonprofit organizations, domestic, foreign and international companies, and both large and small firms. Topics include analysis of market opportunities, segmentation and planning, product mix and development strategies, pricing, distribution and sales. This course has a managerial orientation and uses an analytical approach.

  
  • MGMT 556 - Operations Management

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509 and ECON 501
    After an overview of the role of operations in the economy, some advanced approaches for achieving operational competitiveness in businesses are illustrated through case studies. The following topics will be explored: operations concepts and its interaction with other functions, process design and analysis, capacity management, quality management, revenue management and supply chain management.

  
  • MGMT 562 - Strategic Management of Technological Innovation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 551 and MGMT 507 and MGMT 509; or waiver upon acceptance
    This course employs extensive case analyses to explore alternative strategies for the management of new technology. Students develop a systems and process perspective through research on emerging approaches to strategic management, including business process re-engineering, organizational learning, sustainability, concurrent engineering, supply chain management and self-directed teams, among others.

  
  • MGMT 570 - Organizational Behavior

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509 or waiver upon acceptance
    The focus of this course is to study individual behavior within an organizational setting. The course enables students to better understand the issues that affect individual and group dynamics within an organization so students learn how to solve “people” issues within the organization. Topics covered include: group dynamics, team-building, employee training and development, organizational culture, organizational structure and leadership.

  
  • MGMT 571 - Organizational Culture and Work Force Diversity

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509 or waiver upon acceptance
    This course uses knowledge about different cultures, across organizational types, industries, and nations, to develop an understanding of how diverse members of an organization can work together toward shared values, while still maintaining their individual identities. Students study a variety of culture-dependent approaches to time, space, language and workplace practices. The management of work force diversity as a valuable resource for organizational creativity and knowledge-building provides a special emphases.

  
  • MGMT 572 - Interpersonal and Group Behavior

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509 or waiver upon acceptance
    This course prepares students to participate as effective group members and to act as successful group leaders in workplace project teams. Students study the set of skills that professionals and managers need to meet the challenges posed by trends toward organizational decentralization, functional integration, use of cross-functional project teams and work force diversity. Theories of interpersonal and group behavior offer students the opportunity to assess individual skills and to experiment with new skills.

  
  • MGMT 575 - Managing Human Capital

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509
    The 21st century focus of this course is to provide the firm with competitive advantages associated with the organization’s human resources. The course is designed to provide students with the practical skills to effectively manage people. Skill areas include the design, implementation and improvement in recruiting systems, performance evaluation systems, people development practices, reward systems to motivate employees, talent management and retention.

  
  • MGMT 576 - Organizational Change and Leadership

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509 or waiver upon acceptance
    This course examines the impact of leadership on the organizational change process within a variety of work settings. New leadership styles and practices emerging in the context of cross-functional structures, joint ventures and project-based organizations provide a special emphasis. Through both in-class exercises and group projects, students learn about approaches to change management and develop awareness of their leadership attributes.

  
  • MGMT 577 - Power and Influence in Organizations

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509 or waiver upon acceptance
    This course explores the nature, practice, and effects of power and influence in work organizations. Students study classical and contemporary ideas on leadership to understand how the concepts and practices of power and influence are changing. Cases and simulations demonstrate methods for the effective and ethical exercise of power and influence in organizational units, on project teams and within the organizational culture as a whole.

  
  • MGMT 578 - Organizational Development

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 509 or waiver upon acceptance
    This course explores current topics in organizational development and change, including the practical and ethical issues arising in the context of multinational organizations and the conduct or international business. Guest speakers augment student presentations and seminar discussions.

  
  • MGMT 580 - Business Research Methods

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 555 and MGMT 556 and MGMT 570 and MGMT 575
    Business research involves systematic inquiry whose objective is to provide information useful in solving managerial problems. This course builds on students’ knowledge of organizational needs and practices by focusing on how to do business research with an emphasis on applied problem solving. It has a major focus on problem identification and analysis, problem solving strategies and communication skills.

  
  • MGMT 582 - Business System Design and Integration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 508 and MGMT 509; or waiver upon acceptance
    This course introduces fundamental concepts of data communications, networking, and decision support systems. Included are topics such as processing quantitative and qualitative information, systems analysis and design, technical aspects of data transmission, network architecture and implications for management.

  
  • MGMT 590 - Management Systems Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 508 and MGMT 509, or waiver upon acceptance; and 21 graduate credit hours in ACFI and/or ECON and/or MGMT
    Students will demonstrate and utilize their knowledge through a practical, in-depth analysis of a management system. Working with a client organization, students will assure that their analyses integrate strategic systems, information systems and management systems to facilitate organizational change.

  
  • MGMT 594 - Marketing Management and Strategy

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 555
    This course integrates the formulation of a marketing program with an organization’s overall business strategy. Students learn how and why social, economic and political forces affect the selection and success of a marketing program, and ways in which a business firm can continue to meet the needs of its market segments in the context of these forces.

  
  • MGMT 595 - Strategic Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 551 and MGMT 555 and MGMT 556 and MGMT 575
    This capstone course emphasizes managerial decision-making that involves all aspects of an organization. It tests the capability of the student to apply all prior learning to solve actual strategic management problems. The final project of the course is project-based and serves as an outcomes assessment of what the student has learned in the program.

  
  • MGMT 598 - Leadership, Ethics and Corporate Accountability

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 551 and MGMT 555 and MGMT 556 and MGMT 570 and MGMT 575
    Students evaluate business decision problems from the perspective of ethical principles and corporate social responsibility, utilize different approaches to applying corporate social responsibility in the evaluation of business decision problems, and learn to communicate the values associated with social responsibility from a leadership position.

  
  • MGMT 599 - Topical Seminar in Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Faculty members offer topics of special interest that stem from their own work and that are relevant to students work and interests. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. This course may be repeated twice for different topics.


Mathematics

  
  • MATC 560 - Topics in Mathematics for Teachers

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: May be specified depending on the nature of the topic
    Special topics of relevance to mathematics teachers will be offered from time to time. The topics to be offered will be content focused and directly related to the strands of the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework, as they pertain to mathematics teachers. This course is not part of the MAT in Mathematics. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
  • MATH 090 - Math Readiness

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Not open to students with a major in accounting and finance, aviation science, biology, chemistry, computer science, earth science, mathematics, management or physics; nor to students with a minor in actuarial science, biochemistry, chemistry, mathematics or physics
    This course provides background in basic mathematical concepts and skills to prepare students for non-precalculus-based college-level math courses. Topics include fundamental principles of arithmetic, algebra and geometry. Graded on a (S) Satisfactory/(U) Unsatisfactory basis. (Formerly FRSK 102) NOTE: This course does not provide adequate preparation for courses numbered MATH 120 or higher. Students may not take both MATH 090 and MATH 095. This course does not satisfy any core curriculum requirement, nor may the credits be applied toward the minimum credits required for graduation by any major.

  
  • MATH 095 - Precalculus Readiness

    (4 credits)
    This course covers algebra fundamentals to prepare students for college-level precalculus. Each student will complete an individualized, mastery-based review and engage in a series of concept-building workshops. Topics include integer and fraction arithmetic, linear equations and inequalities, systems of two linear equations, properties of exponents, polynomial algebra and factoring, quadratic equations, radical and rational expressions, and graphs of linear and quadratic equations. Graded on a (S) Satisfactory/(U) Unsatisfactory basis. (Formerly FRSK 102E) NOTE: Students may not take both MATH 090 and MATH 095. This course does not satisfy any core curriculum requirements, nor may the credits be applied toward the minimum required for graduation by any major.

  
  • MATH 105 - Mathematical Thought and Practice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Mathematics placement test or MATH 090 with a minimum grade of “S” or MATH 095 with a minimum grade of “S”
    This course is an introduction to the foundations of mathematical reasoning, emphasizing conceptual reasoning over numerical computations. Students will explore the beauty and diversity of mathematical thought, and solve problems using sets and logical operations, and number theory. This course does not provide preparation for other college-level mathematics courses. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 110/MATH 110E - Elementary Statistics I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Mathematics placement test or MATH 090 with a minimum grade of “S” or MATH 095 with a minimum grade of “S”
    Corequisite: Students enrolled in the enhanced course (MATH 110E) must also enroll in the corequisite course MATH 110T - Problem Solving in Statistics

    This course provides an introduction to measures of central tendency and variability; elementary probability; binomial, normal and t distributions; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 110T - Problem Solving in Statistics

    (1 credit)
    Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with MATH 110E
    This course is a required corequisite for MATH 110E, the enhanced version of Elementary Statistics I. Under faculty supervision, students acquire strategies of problem solving and study skills related to their statistics course. Each week students will attend a one hour recitation with a mathematics coach and two additional tutoring hours on problem solving with the coach. This course may be repeated three times. This course is graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • MATH 112 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Mathematics placement test or MATH 090 with a minimum grade of “S” or MATH 095 with a minimum grade of “S”; restricted to majors in early childhood, elementary and special education
    This course develops student’s understanding of the mathematical concepts of number and operations, and the properties of number systems at the deep level required for successful elementary school teaching in ways that are meaningful to pre-service elementary teachers. Topics will include place value and arithmetic models, mental math, algorithms, prealgebra factors and prime numbers, fractions and decimals, ratio, percentage and rate, integers and elementary number theory. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 113 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 107 with a “C-” or higher or MATH 112 with a “C-” or higher; restricted to majors in early childhood, elementary and special education
    This course develops student’s understanding of the mathematical content of geometry, measurement, probability and statistics at the deep level required for successful elementary school teaching in ways that are meaningful to pre-service elementary teachers. Topics will include two- and three- dimensional geometry, measurement, data analysis, single variable statistics and probability. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 114 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers III

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 107 with a “C-” or higher or MATH 112 with a “C-” or higher; restricted to majors in early childhood, elementary and special education
    This course develops student’s understanding of the mathematical content of patterns, functions and algebra at the deep level required for successful elementary school teaching in ways that are meaningful to pre-service elementary teachers. Topics will include concepts of variable and function; linear, quadratic and exponential functions and their graphs; patterns, arithmetic and geometric progressions; solving equations and applications. Connections between arithmetic and algebra will be emphasized. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 120 - Introduction to Linear Algebra

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Mathematics placement test or MATH 095 with a minimum grade of “S”
    Topics include algebra and geometry of vectors in Rn, linear equations, matrices, determinants, basis and dimension, and the use of homogenous coordinates for the matrix representation of linear and geometric transformations and their compositions. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 125 - Integrated Science and Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    This course is designed to prepare incoming science and mathematics students in the STREAMS summer bridge program for the mathematical needs of their first-year coursework. In this course, students will study precalculus-level mathematics in the context of how it arises in the sciences. Topics include measurement, uncertainty, and responsible use of data; units and dimensional analysis; linear modeling and rates of change; linearization of exponential, logarithmic, power and other relationships, principles of trigonometry; and effective communication of quantitative meaning in writing, graphs, and data tables. Offered summer only. NOTE: This course is not a substitute for precalculus (MATH 140/150) and does not satisfy prerequisites for any MATH course.

  
  • MATH 130 - Discrete Mathematics I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Mathematics placement test or MATH 095 with a minimum grade of “S”
    This course provides some of the mathematical background necessary for computer science. Topics include combinations and discrete probability, discrete functions and graph theory. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 135 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in mathematics allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered fall semester.

  
  • MATH 136 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in mathematics allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered spring semester.

  
  • MATH 140/MATH 140E - Elements of Precalculus

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Mathematics placement test
    Corequisite: Students enrolled in the enhanced course (MATH 140E) must also enroll in the corequisite course MATH 140T - Problem Solving in Precalculus

    This course is designed to help prepare students for the study of calculus. Topics covered include a review of algebraic fundamentals (exponents, logarithms, linear and non-linear equations and inequalities) and a study of functions of various types (polynomial, rational and transcendental). (Formerly MATH 100) (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 140T - Problem Solving in Precalculus

    (1 credit)
    Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with MATH 140E
    This course is a required corequisite for MATH 140E, the enhanced version of Elements of Precalculus. Under faculty supervision, students acquire strategies of problem solving and study skills related to their precalculus course. Each week students will attend a one hour recitation with a mathematics coach and two additional tutoring hours on problem solving with the coach. This course may be repeated three times. This course is graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • MATH 141 - Elements of Calculus I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 140/140E with a “C-” or higher or MATH 150 with a “C-” or higher or a mathematics placement test
    This course introduces the student to the main concepts, methods, and techniques of differential calculus. Emphasis is on how these arise from problems in several areas, rather than from a rigorous development of the theory. A principal objective of this course is to illustrate how mathematics is used to model physical reality and how such a mathematical model facilitates the solution of problems. This course does not satisfy mathematics major requirement. Credit cannot be given for both MATH 141 and MATH 144. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 142 - Elements of Calculus II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 141 with a “C-” or higher
    The topics include the integral and its applications as well as multivariable calculus. Additional topics are selected from: differential equations, Taylor series and probability distributions. This course does not satisfy mathematics major requirements. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 143 - Problem Solving in Mathematics

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Registration in designated enhanced MATH course
    This course is a required corequisite for enhanced sections supported by small-group structured learning assistance. Under faculty supervision, students acquire strategies of problem solving, study skills and mathematical inquiry to help them succeed in mathematics. Students in this course will attend a weekly tutorial session led by a peer learning assistant (PAL) in which they will engage in inquiry-based and small-group problem solving. This course may be repeated twice for credit. This course will be graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • MATH 144 - Applied Calculus for Business

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 140/140E with a “C-” or higher or MATH 150 with a “C-” or higher or a mathematics placement test
    This is a one-semester course in applied differential and integral calculus with emphasis on business applications. Topics to be covered include derivatives of algebraic, logarithmic and exponential functions, optimization problems, antiderivatives and the fundamental theorem of calculus, techniques of integration, functions of several variables and partial derivatives. This course does not satisfy mathematics major requirements. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 150 - Precalculus with Trigonometry

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: Mathematics placement test or MATH 095 with a minimum grade of “S”
    This course is designed to help prepare students for the study of calculus. Topics covered include a review of algebraic fundamentals (exponents, logarithms, linear and non-linear equations and inequalities), a study of polynomial, rational and transcendental functions as well as trigonometric functions, identities and equations. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 161/161E - Single Variable Calculus I

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 150 with a “C-” or higher or a mathematics placement test or consent of department
    Corequisite: Students enrolled in the enhanced course (MATH 161E) must also enroll in an appropriate section of the corequisite course MATH 143 - Problem Solving in Mathematics

    This course will provide an introduction to the topics and techniques of single-variable calculus. Differential calculus topics will include limits and derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions as well as applications of the derivative. Integral calculus topics will include antiderivatives, area and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 162 - Single Variable Calculus II

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 161/161E with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of department
    This course is a continuation of material found in MATH 161. Topics will include integration techniques and applications of integration using algebraic and transcendental functions. In addition, sequences and series will be discussed. (CMAR)

  
  • MATH 180 - Transition to Advanced Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 161/161E with a minimum grade of “C-“, which may be taken concurrently
    This course is an introduction to formal mathematics and provides a transition from computation-based mathematics to the more theoretical approach used in advanced mathematics courses. Topics covered include mathematical logic, set theory, concepts of relation, function and cardinality, and the design and structure of axioms and axiomatic systems are discussed. A large emphasis is placed on reading, analyzing and learning to produce proofs of mathematical statements. (CLOR)

  
  • MATH 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
  • MATH 200 - Statistical Methods I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 141 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 161 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    This course provides an introduction to statistical methods for acquiring, describing and making decisions from data. Topics include induction, sampling design, the calculation and choice of descriptive statistics as measures of central tendency and variability, permutations, combinations, random variables, probability models, conditional probability, independence, the law of total probability and Bayes’ Theorem, expected values, confidence intervals for means and proportions, the Central Limit Theorem, common univariate distributions to include the binomial, normal, t, and exponential distributions, and an introduction to hypothesis testing.

  
  • MATH 202 - Linear Algebra

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 142 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 152 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 162 with a minimum grade of “C-” (MATH 162 may be taken concurrently); and MATH 180 with a minimum grade of “C-“, which may be taken concurrently
    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts and theory of linear algebra. Topics include systems of linear equations and techniques for solving them, linear independence and dependence, linear transformations and their matrix representations, matrix algebra, characterizations of invertible matrices, determinants, vector spaces and subspaces, null and column spaces, Basis Theorem, Rank Theorem, as well as eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Additional topics and applications of linear algebra may be covered as time permits.

  
  • MATH 261 - Multivariable Calculus

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 162 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course is a continuation of the MATH 161/161E - MATH 162 Single Variable Calculus I-II sequence. Topics will include parametric and polar equations, derivatives and integrals of multivariable functions, and vector analysis.

  
  • MATH 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in mathematics allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered fall semester.

  
  • MATH 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in mathematics allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered spring semester.

  
  • MATH 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • MATH 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • MATH 300 - Statistical Methods II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course provides an introduction to statistical methods for testing hypotheses and analyzing associations between two or more categorical or quantitative variables. Topics include hypothesis testing, formulation of a statistical question, size, power, confidence intervals, rejection regions, p-values, type 1 and type 2 errors, contingency tables, experimental design, independence, dependence, tests of independence, describing and measuring the strength of association, use of residuals, simple and multiple regression, prediction intervals, model checking and goodness-of-fit tests, ANOVA, and an introduction to nonparametric statistics. Offered spring semester.

  
  • MATH 301 - Abstract Algebra I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course provides an introduction to algebraic structures, beginning with the study of group theory. Topics include binary operations, modular arithmetic, groups (abelian, matrix, symmetry, permutation), subgroups and Lagrange’s Theorem, homomorphisms and Cayley’s Theorem, and basic properties of rings and fields.

  
  • MATH 302 - Abstract Algebra II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 301 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course extends the study of algebraic structures from groups to both rings and fields, with particular emphasis on polynomial rings and number fields. Topics include group actions on sets, linear groups, rings and ideals, field extensions and automorphisms, Galois theory, insolubility of the quintic, and the fundamental theorem of algebra. Offered annually.

  
  • MATH 303 - Number Theory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of department
    Development of the number system, the Euclidean Algorithm and its consequences, theory of congruencies, number-theoretic functions, Diophantine equations and quadratic residues. Offered annually.

  
  • MATH 316 - Differential Equations

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 251 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 261 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course is an introduction to ordinary differential equations. Topics include first-order differential equations (separable equations, linear equations, exact equations, integrating factors), second- and higher-order differential equations (homogeneous and non-homogeneous linear equations, method of undetermined coefficients), variation of parameters for second-order equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions and applications.

  
  • MATH 318 - Quantitative Methods for Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 142 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 144 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 152 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 162 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and MATH 110/110E with a minimum grade of “C-” or ECON 210 or equivalent
    This course presents selected mathematical tools and techniques for analysis of business and economic problems as an aid to decision-making in management. Topics include probability distributions, decision theory, linear programming, sensitivity analysis and other standard quantitative concepts.

  
  • MATH 325 - Foundations of Geometry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    In this course, students will broaden their understanding of Euclidean geometry; study finite geometries, geometric transformations and non-Euclidean geometries; write geometric proofs; construction problems; and apply geometric concepts to real-world situations.

  
  • MATH 340 - Graph Theory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    This course introduces the basic definitions, concepts, topics and theorems of graph theory including the structure, connectivity and vulnerability of graphs. A wide range of examples such as the traveling salesperson problems, Dijkstra’s algorithm, Huffmann codes and Fleury’s algorithm will also be examined. Offered annually.

  
  • MATH 341 - Cryptology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    Cryptology is the study of the composition, design, use and analysis of methods and systems to encrypt and decrypt messages. This course begins with a review of classical cryptosystems from shift ciphers to the enigma machine. Modern private-key encryption schemes such as AES (the Advanced Encryption Standard) and public-key encryption schemes such as RSA will also be studied. In addition, digital signatures, secret sharing and zero-knowledge proofs will be examined. Other techniques and methods of cryptology such as steganography, discrete logarithms, elliptic curves and quantum computing may be explored. Offered annually.

  
  • MATH 345 - Combinatorics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    Methods examined in this course are permutations, combinations, the sum and product rules, ordered and unordered selection with or without repetition, identical and distinct ranges, the pigeonhole principle, binomial coefficients, inclusion/exclusion, derangements, partitions, recurrence relations, generating functions and Ramsey theory. Special topics may include Latin squares, graph theory, network flows, coding theory, designs, polya counting, partially ordered sets and lattices. Offered annually.

  
  • MATH 350 - Regression Analysis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-” and MATH 300 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course provides an in-depth look at what regression is and how to effectively use it to produce and interpret statistical models. Topics include modeling assumptions, simple and multiple linear regression, covariance, correlation, confidence and prediction intervals, estimating regression parameters, tests of hypotheses about the regression coefficients, interpretations of regression coefficients especially in multiple linear models, various types of residuals, measures of influence, transformations of variables, weighted least squares, heteroscedasticity, and variable selection. Offered fall semester.

  
  • MATH 353 - Design and Analysis of Experiments

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-” and MATH 300 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course provides an in-depth look at the statistical design and analysis of experiments. The emphases are on understanding design choices, critical assessment of design options, correct communication of conclusions, and use of statistical software to calculate test statistics. Topics include formulating a statistical question, confounding, randomization, blocking, replication, analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, variance stabilizing transformations, factorial designs, random effects and mixed effects models, repeated measures, and nested and split-plot designs. Offered spring semester.

  
  • MATH 355 - Mathematics Study Tour

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; additional prerequisites will vary by study tour
    This course offers students a first-hand, supervised cross-cultural travel and study experience while exploring a variety of mathematical topics. Topics and destinations will vary, but may include history of mathematics, mathematical modeling, statistical analysis and mathematics education. Each faculty-led course includes on-campus pre-departure lectures, activities at the destination, and post-departure sessions at BSU. May be repeated for different itineraries for a maximum of six credits. Offered periodically. (CGCL)

  
  • MATH 398 - Advanced Topics in Statistics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: May be specified depending on the nature of the topic
    This course explores a variety of advanced statistical concepts not covered in other courses. Topics will change from semester to semester and will be announced prior to registration. May be repeated for different topics up to a maximum of nine credits.

  
  • MATH 399 - Topics in Advanced Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: May be specified depending on the nature of the topic
    This course explores a variety of advanced mathematical concepts from the general areas of pure and applied mathematics not covered in other courses. Topics will change from semester to semester and will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated for different topics up to a maximum of nine credits.

  
  • MATH 401 - Introduction to Real Analysis I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and MATH 252 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 261 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course introduces real analysis through the rigorous study of sequences and continuity. Topics include mathematical logic and proof techniques, the set of real numbers, the Completeness Axiom, limits of sequences, monotone and Cauchy sequences, subsequences, open sets, closed sets, compact sets, continuity of functions, the Intermediate Value Theorem and uniform continuity.

  
  • MATH 402 - Introduction to Analysis II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 401 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to the rigorous study of continuity, differentiation, integration, sequences and series of functions. Topics in this course will include the Intermediate Value Theorem, Mean Value Theorem, Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Integral Calculus, convergence theorems, and uniform continuity. Offered spring semester.

  
  • MATH 403 - Probability Theory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and MATH 251 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 261 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This calculus-based course provides a foundation for the mathematical theory of statistics. Topics include probability axioms, probability spaces, discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions, joint distributions, transformations of variables, order statistics, expected values, laws of large numbers, the central limit theorem, conditional distributions and their expectations, moment generating functions and characteristic functions. The course also introduces estimation theory, including maximum likelihood estimators, method of moment estimators, the Cramer-Rao lower bound, and sufficiency, efficiency and consistency of estimators, as well as Bayesian estimation.

  
  • MATH 408 - History of Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and MATH 252 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 261 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    A historical development of mathematics from ancient time to the Middle Ages (c. 3500 B.C. to c. 1400 A.D.). Some of the topics covered include Egyptian, Babylonian and Mayan Numeration Systems; Greek mathematics, including the Pythagorean, Platonic and Alexandrian schools; Asian contributions and the Arabic Hegemony; and principal mathematicians of the European Middle Ages, including Alcuin, Fibonacci and Oresme. (CWRM)

  
  • MATH 412 - Mathematical Statistics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 403 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course is a calculus-based approach to the analysis of hypothesis tests, and both point and interval estimators. Topics include: Uniform Minimum Variance Unbiased Estimation (UMVUE), Uniformly Most Powerful (UMP) tests, correlation and regression, Best Linear Unbiased Estimation (BLUE), Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), as well as a study of how the gamma, t, chi-squared, and F distributions arise. Offered spring semester.

  
  • MATH 415 - Numerical Analysis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and MATH 251 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 261 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course provides an introduction to the quantitative approximation of solutions to mathematical problems. Topics include solution of algebraic and transcendental equations, general iteration, the Newton-Raphson method, approximation of functions and curve fitting, the Lagrange interpolation formula, Newton’s forward difference method, the method of least squares, orthogonality, numerical integration and the Euler-Cauchy technique. Offered annually.

  
  • MATH 416 - Applied Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 251 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 261 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    Fourier analysis, solutions of partial differential equations, special functions, and line and surface integrals. (CWRM)

  
  • MATH 417 - Functions of a Complex Variable

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 401 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to functions of one complex variable. Topics include the algebra and geometry of complex numbers, analytic and harmonic functions, differentiation, elementary functions of a complex variable, integration, contour integrals, power series, residues and poles, and conformal mapping. Offered spring semester.

  
  • MATH 418 - Introduction to Operations Research

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 or consent of instructor
    Operations research models of various real-life applications will be introduced. Students will learn how to formulate deterministic or probabilistic mathematical models, solve these models with existing algorithms by hand or by computer, and interpret the computer output solutions for these problems. In addition, students will learn the mathematical theory behind these algorithms. Topics may include linear programming and duality, the simplex algorithm and goal programming, sensitivity and post-optimality analyses, decision making under uncertainty, and game theory, as well as shortest route, minimal spanning tree, and maximal flow problems. Offered annually.

  
  • MATH 445 - Logic Programming

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Junior or senior mathematics major or equivalent background; and consent of the department
    The propositional and first order predicate logic from an axiomatic point of view will be studied. Algorithmic methods of theorem proving will be emphasized. Offered periodically.

  
  • MATH 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students
    In this course, one-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
  • MATH 498 - Internship in Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 and an overall minimum GPA of 2.8 and a minimum mathematics major GPA of 2.8; consent of department chair; formal application required
    This non-classroom experience is intended to give students workplace experiences in mathematics through internships or external projects. This course offers an opportunity for students to integrate mathematical knowledge obtained from classroom theory with practical work experiences. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits, with different topics. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • MATH 499 - Directed Study in Mathematics

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
  • MATH 502 - Research

    (3 or 6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Original research undertaken by the graduate student in their field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • MATH 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • MATH 507 - Topology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 251 and MATH 301 or equivalent; and admission to the MAT in Mathematics program; or consent of instructor
    Elements of point set topology, closed sets and open sets in metric spaces, continuous mappings, connection, separation theorems, and compactness.

  
  • MATH 508 - History of Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Mathematics program or consent of instructor
    A historical development of mathematics from ancient time to the Middle Ages (c. 3500 B.C. to c. 1400 A.D.). Some of the topics covered include Egyptian, Babylonian and Mayan Numeration Systems; Greek mathematics, including the Pythagorean, Platonic and Alexandrian schools; Asian contributions and the Arabic Hegemony; and principal mathematicians of the European Middle Ages, including Alcuin, Fibonacci and Oresme. Students will be required to complete two projects that will culminate in formal presentations.

  
  • MATH 510 - Group Theory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 301 or equivalent; and admission to the MAT in Mathematics program
    Groups, subgroups, homomorphisms, normal subgroups and quotient groups, generators, normal structure and the Jordan-Holden Theorem, direct products of groups.

  
  • MATH 511 - Ring Theory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 301 or equivalent; and admission to the MAT in Mathematics program; or consent of instructor
    Examples of rings, ideals and homomorphisms, the Jacobson radical, direct sums, Boolean rings and rings with chain conditions.

  
  • MATH 518 - Topics in Analysis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 202 and MATH 252; and admission to the MAT in Mathematics program; or consent of instructor
    The course consists of a detailed discussion of limits, continuity, and applications of differential and integral calculus, and the real number system. Group and/or individual projects will be required as part of the course. This course is designed to provide graduate-level mathematics education students with an introduction to analysis, appropriate to the needs of secondary school mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 520 - Real Analysis


  
  • MATH 522 - Complex Analysis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 401 and admission to the MAT in Mathematics program; or consent of instructor
    Analytic functions of a complex variable, differentiation and integration in the complex plane. Cauchy’s theorems, infinite series, Laurent expansions and theory of residues.

  
  • MATH 527 - Cryptology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT Mathematics program or consent of the instructor or consent of the department chairperson
    Cryptology is the study of the composition, design, use and analysis of methods and systems to encrypt and decrypt messages. Classical cryptosystems from shift ciphers to the enigma machine will be reviewed first. Then private-key encryption schemes such as AES (the Advanced Encryption Standard) and public-key encryption schemes such as RSA will be studied. Methods of cryptanalysis will be investigated. Other techniques and methods of cryptology such as digital signatures, secret sharing, zero-knowledge proofs, steganography, discrete logarithms, elliptic curves and quantum computing may be explored.

  
  • MATH 551 - Topics in Finite Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Mathematics program or consent of instructor
    This course is designed for teachers of mathematics, and will extend and enrich the topics of finite mathematics. Possible topics include sets, logic, probability, statistics, combinatorics and graph theory.

  
  • MATH 552 - Topics in Analytic Geometry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Mathematics program or consent of instructor
    Properties, definitions and applications of conic sections will be studied. Vectors, polar coordinates and calculus will be used to enhance the presentation and to develop formulas for tangent lines, areas and volumes. Translation and rotation of axis and invariants under translation will be covered. Quadric surfaces and their graphs, along with homogeneous coordinates, will be discussed.

  
  • MATH 561 - Topics in Number Theory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Mathematics program or consent of instructor
    Topics will include an in-depth study of primes, divisibility, congruence, number theoretic functions, numeration systems and other related topics selected by the instructor.

  
  • MATH 562 - Topics in Geometry

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Mathematics program or consent of instructor
    This course employs classical and modern tools to explore topics that extend and enrich the standard high school geometry curriculum. Possible topics include transformations, tessellations, non-Euclidean geometrics and fractals.

  
  • MATH 582 - Topics in Problem Solving Using Technology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Mathematics program or consent of instructor
    This course will include an in-depth study of problem-solving techniques in mathematics using technology. Application problems will include topics from physical and social sciences.

  
  • MATH 596 - Topics in Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Mathematics or consent of instructor
    Topics are chosen from various areas of study in mathematics, such as statistics, pure mathematics and applied mathematics. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits with different topics.


Middle School Education

  
  • MSED 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

 

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