Aug 18, 2022  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJU 425 - Comparative Crime and Deviance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 341 and CRJU 410
    This course examines crime, law and deviance in comparative perspective. Among the topics covered will be the logic of comparative research problems of cross-national data, violent crime, economic and political crime, transnational corporate crime, underdevelopment and crime, social control and conflict resolution, and criminal justice and penal policies. The course also focuses on crime in relation to age, gender, race and class. The comparative materials are used to reflect on problems of crime and the criminal justice system in the United States. Offered alternate spring semesters.

  
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    CRJU 426 - Ethnography and Crime Analysis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 410
    This course examines ethnographic research methodologies as they relate to crime and justice. The culture of particular criminal groups, as well as justice agents, is often unveiled for the first time through the efforts of field researchers. Students will learn how researchers enter the world of their subjects, build trust, process information and report social phenomena. Offered alternate years.

  
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    CRJU 427 - Alternative Crime Analysis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 410, which may be taken concurrently; and CRJU 320 (previously CRJU 420); or consent of instructor
    This course introduces students to structured real-time observations of the world of crime and criminal interdiction. Students will learn about the theories, practices and potential pitfalls of field research, from design to application and interpretation. Students will be introduced to the six most commonly employed approaches in qualitative research: narrative research, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, case studies and content analysis. As a final project, students will choose one approach and will design a mock study intended to enhance potential future study of crime and the criminal justice system.

  
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    CRJU 428 - Culture and Crime

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 201 and CRJU 202
    This course examines the impact of what occurs before crimes are ever committed. Students will begin with an exposure to the definitions of culture, its impact on society, and the way(s) in which subcultures shape worldviews and notions of right and wrong. The course will introduce concepts such as resistance, transgression, and seduction as both predictors and explanations of crime within the overarching context of the power relationships experienced by the various cultures co-existing within our society. (CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    CRJU 441 - Homicide

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 341 and CRJU 410; or consent of instructor
    This course explores key theoretical paradigms, as well as current research related to homicide. Situating homicide in the U.S. within global patterns and historical trends, this class investigates the following phenomena: types of homicide, which include femicide (murder of women), intimate partner homicide, serial murder, hate murder, rampage killings, gang murder and terrorism. The course also addresses the characteristics of homicide victims and offenders, along with identifying factors that contribute to variance in homicide levels and specific types of homicide. Finally, beginning with legal definitions of homicide, the course surveys how the criminal justice system responds to homicide.

  
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    CRJU 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students and senior status. CRJU 320 (previously CRJU 420).
    The Honors Thesis can only be taken as a two-semester thesis. Students must enroll in CRJU 485 in a second consecutive semester after having successfully completed the first semester of CRJU 485. The Departmental Honors Committee will determine if the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    CRJU 496 - Seminar: Critical Issues in Crime and Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Senior standing and CRJU 320 (previously CRJU 420) and CRJU 330 (previously CRJU 430) and CRJU 331 and CRJU 341 and CRJU 354 and CRJU 406; and CRJU 410, which may be taken concurrently
    This course is designed to provide criminal justice majors with a capstone experience, which emphasizes integration of knowledge and skills acquired throughout the criminal justice curriculum. Using an interdisciplinary lens, students analyze critical issues of diversity, inequality and power related to crime and justice. The seminar will require students to demonstrate: 1) comprehensive knowledge of the field of criminal justice; 2) critical thinking skills; 3) effectiveness in oral and written communication; 4) awareness of ethical issues; and 5) knowledge of data sources and the ability to apply criminal justice related information and research.

  
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    CRJU 497 - Research

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Senior standing and CRJU 320 (previously CRJU 420) and CRJU 330 (previously CRJU 430) and CRJU 331 and CRJU 341 and CRJU 354 and CRJU 406; and CRJU 410, which may be taken concurrently; and consent of department; formal application required
    Students will conduct social research using techniques taught in CRJU 320, writing reports of findings as for publication. Experimental survey and content analysis approaches will be used. This course is primarily for criminal justice majors; others by special arrangement.

  
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    CRJU 498 - Internship in Criminal Justice

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Senior standing and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 and CRJU 320 (previously CRJU 420) and CRJU 331 and CRJU 341 and CRJU 354 and CRJU 406 and CRJU 410; and CRJU 330 (previously CRJU 430), which may be taken concurrently; and consent of the department; formal application required
    The internship provides an opportunity for senior criminal justice majors to gain practical expertise in the field by participating in an off-campus work study experience that complements their academic preparation. In addition to working in their internship setting, students will meet regularly with a faculty supervisor. Students may work in an appropriate local, state or federal agency or private organization. Only three credits of internship may count toward the major in criminal justice. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Offered either semester.

  
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    CRJU 499 - Directed Study in Criminal Justice

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
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    CRJU 500 - Foundations of Scholarship

    (3 credits)
    This course provides students with opportunities to better develop the tools needed for scholarly graduate-level research and writing, including critical thinking, analysis and writing. There will be an emphasis on research-based writing, e.g., conducting a literature review, evaluating claims, and planning and drafting papers. This course will also address appropriate documentation and citation methodologies; the utilization of library resources, print and electronic data sources, legal research and computer use. Methods for writing a successful master’s thesis will also be incorporated.

  
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    CRJU 501 - Structure and Process of the Criminal Justice System

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course examines the organization of the criminal justice system and explores the nature of relationships among its components. The origins of criminal law, law enforcement agencies, federal and state court systems and corrections are reviewed. In addition, the functions and processes of each essential agency within the criminal justice system are investigated. Students completing this course will gain a solid understanding of the evolution of the modern criminal justice system as it developed from its Western European and British roots.

  
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    CRJU 502 - Research

    (3 or 6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of department; formal application required; and CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    Original research is undertaken by the graduate student in their field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    CRJU 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of department; formal application required and CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    CRJU 504 - Seminar: Crime, Justice and Society

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This seminar introduces students to crime and justice in American society. It provides an overview of central issues in criminal justice and of the five core areas in criminal justice 1) criminal justice and juvenile justice processes, 2) criminology, 3) law enforcement, 4) law adjudication and 5) corrections.

  
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    CRJU 505 - Applications of Crime Theory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course utilizes an applied approach in examining fundamental and advanced theories of crime and criminals based on explicit and implicit theories of causation. Recognizing this process, this course focuses on theories and their manifestations of crime and justice programs. Students will learn theory and theory validity by evaluating empirical evidence of program effects.

  
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    CRJU 510 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500
    This course provides an overview of the research process and research design in relation to crime and criminal justice. Topics covered include the scientific method, operationalizing variables and indicators, ethics and policy in research and various methods of collecting data. Students will design and carry out a research project.

  
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    CRJU 511 - Analyzing Criminal Justice Data

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently; and CRJU 510
    This course focuses on statistical data analysis in relation to research in crime and criminal justice. Topics covered include the most important data analysis techniques in social and criminal justice research the assumptions underlying various statistical techniques, and how to interpret quantitative data analysis. Students will learn to carry out their own data analysis.

  
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    CRJU 512 - Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently; and CRJU 504 and CRJU 505
    This course provides an overview and analysis of major ethical and policy issues related to crime and criminal justice. Students will examine various ethical issues including those related to policing, the death penalty and criminal courts and law. The course will also cover criminal justice policy.

  
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    CRJU 515 - Criminal Justice Administration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course draws on research in complex organizations to analyze the structure, functions and operations of criminal justice agencies, including the police, courts and corrections. Students will gain an understanding of administration in criminal justice organizations.

  
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    CRJU 517 - Studies in Crime Prevention: Understanding What Works

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently; and CRJU 504 and CRJU 505; or consent of instructor
    This course conducts a comprehensive examination of crime prevention programs in the United States. In addition to the analysis of program features (e.g., assumptions, concepts, process, outcomes, evaluation), students will also review the social and political climates surrounding crime prevention programs. Because these initiatives are wide-ranging and often occur outside of the criminal justice system, students will learn about crime prevention programs based in the following venues: the family, the school, the community, and in job training and placement programs.

  
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    CRJU 518 - Hate Crimes and Hate Groups

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently; and CRJU 504 and CRJU 505; or consent of instructor
    This course examines the etiology of hate crime, its characteristics and the social ecology that nurtures its existence and persistence. In addition to focusing on the crime itself, the course analyzes hate groups, the dynamics of the hate movement as well as the processes of recruitment, affiliation and disaffiliation.

  
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    CRJU 521 - Domestic Violence

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course provides an overview of the causes of domestic violence and the criminal justice system’s response to domestic violence. Topics covered include psychological, sociological and feminist theories of domestic violence; the nature of domestic violence in a patriarchal society; resources available for victims of domestic violence; and the efficacy of various approaches to reducing domestic violence.

  
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    CRJU 522 - Women and Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course provides an overview of women and the criminal justice system. Topics covered include women as offenders, victims, and criminal justice professionals; theories of women and crime; and the treatment of female offenders by criminal justice agencies.

  
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    CRJU 525 - Comparative Crime and Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course examines crime, justice and criminal justice systems in comparative perspective. Topics covered include multinational crime; the relationships between socioeconomic development and crime; and different approaches to law enforcement, criminal procedure and law, juvenile justice and corrections. The course will draw on United Nations criminal justice surveys and other cross-national data sources.

  
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    CRJU 527 - Policing in a Democratic Society

    (3 credits)
    This course provides a comparative overview of the development of police forces, the organization of the police in various societies and the nature of policing in industrial societies.

  
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    CRJU 530 - Introduction to Police Culture: An Intensive Review

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently; and CRJU 504 and CRJU 505
    This course introduces students to the in-depth study of the organizational culture of law enforcement. Specifically, students will delve into a rich, diverse and burgeoning literature on police culture, as they read a number of first-person accounts and weigh relevant theoretical constructs drawn from ethnographic fieldwork. They will explore contentious issues, such as the misuse of force, official corruption and the militarization of policing in 21st century America, with an emphasis on the intensive use of scholarly research and monographs.

  
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    CRJU 540 - Corrections, Crime and Society

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course provides an overview of the relations between crime and corrections. Topics covered include the theories of punishment, the development of corrections, theories of corrections and rehabilitation, and current issues in American corrections.

  
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    CRJU 541 - Community-Based Corrections

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500
    This course focuses on recent developments in community-based corrections. Topics covered include the history of alternatives to prisons, the relationships between community-based corrections and rehabilitation, and the political feasibility of community-based corrections. The course also examines other intermediate sanctions, such as alternative sentencing and diversion programs.

  
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    CRJU 542 - Research Seminar in Corrections

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently; and CRJU 510 and CRJU 511
    In this seminar, students will choose a research topic related to corrections, plan and carry out their research. During weekly class meetings, the class members will discuss their projects and present their results.

  
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    CRJU 546 - Class, Race, Gender and Crime

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course examines how class, race and gender intersect with crime and the criminal justice system. The course provides an overview of class, race, ethnic and gender stratification in the United States and looks at how that stratification is reflected in judgments about crime and in treatments of various groups in the criminal justice system.

  
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    CRJU 550 - Juvenile Justice and Society

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course provides an overview of juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system. It covers various theories of juvenile delinquency and examines their relations to broader sociological and criminological theories. Other topics include the development of the juvenile justice system, the police handling of juveniles, the role of juvenile courts, and juvenile corrections and rehabilitation.

  
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    CRJU 551 - Law and Society

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course provides an overview of the sociology of law. Topics covered include the sources and development of law, different philosophical and sociological approaches to law, the roles of criminal justice agencies, alternate dispute resolution, the relations of between law and social change, and the impact of race, class and gender in the legal system. The course will also examine attempts to develop a general theory of law and society.

  
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    CRJU 555 - Information Technology for Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    This course provides an overview of the impact of computers on criminal justice organization and on the use of computers and quantitative skills in criminal justice administration, decision-making and policy.

  
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    CRJU 561 - Seminar in White Collar Crime

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500 and CRJU 505
    This course provides an in-depth and thematic look at the various types of crimes facilitated by virtue of one’s occupation: i.e., one’s corporate, governmental, or bureaucratic affiliation. The influence of institutional factors as well as regulatory controls will be evaluated against the performance of the criminal justice system in preventing and sanctioning non-traditional crimes committed by non-traditional actors.

  
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    CRJU 571 - Sexual Assault, Offenders and Policy

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course explores the historical evolution of sex crimes. Topics include the age of consent, prostitution, anti-sodomy laws, stranger rape, “sexting,” date rape and sex-offender registration. The course will also examine the impact of sexual assault on victims and offenders, as well as the criminal justice system’s response and the role of policymakers and advocacy groups in the formulation and enforcement of sex crime laws. Graduate students will be expected to demonstrate understanding of a specialized area of sexual violence (e.g., rape in the military, offender treatment, etc.).

  
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    CRJU 597 - Research Seminar in Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently; and CRJU 510 and CRJU 511
    In this seminar students will choose a research topic, plan and carry out their research. During weekly class meetings, the class members will discuss their projects and present their results. This course may be repeated twice for different topics.

  
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    CRJU 598 - Internship in Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    Internships provide students with experience in a criminal justice setting and give them the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their classes.

  
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    CRJU 599 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CRJU 500, which may be taken concurrently
    This course will focus on specific topics in criminal justice. The topics will differ from semester to semester.


Dance

  
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    DANC 140 - Dance Technical Practicum

    (1 credit)
    This practicum is designed to give students hands-on experience in all areas of dance production. Students will divide their 60 hour practicum among backstage technical requirements, dance production management and costume production. This course may be repeated once. Offered either semester.

  
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    DANC 146 - Dance Appreciation

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to explore the basic components of dance and to enable students to appreciate the art of dance as an informed audience and as participants in its rich variety. (Formerly PHED/THEA 146) (CFPA)

  
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    DANC 147 - Theory and Practice of Ballet Fundamentals

    (2 credits)
    This course gives students with little or no dance training the opportunity to obtain the essential fundamental concepts and skills of ballet technique. Emphasis is on correct placement, line and execution. In addition, through out-of-class research, students will obtain general background about ballet which, combined with intensive class work, is intended to create technically proficient and artistically enriched dancers. One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly. (Formerly DANP 147, PHED 147)

  
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    DANC 155 - Dance Practicum

    (1 credit)
    In this class students will choreograph and rehearse dances for a concert performance. Concurrent enrollment in a dance class is strongly advised. This course may be repeated. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Open by audition. (Formerly PHED/THEA 155)

  
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    DANC 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    DANC 237 - Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Fall

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: Dance experience. Students may self-select.
    This course will offer intermediate-level work in the technique and performance of jazz dance. It will also provide a historical overview of jazz dance and some of its most influential artists, so that students gain an understanding of the origins of jazz dance, its various styles and influences and how it differs from other dance forms. In addition to the art and technique of dance being practiced and performed in class, various other assignments will be required including reading and writing assignments and critiques of video and live performances.  This course may be repeated once for credit. One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly. (Formerly DANP 237, PHED 237)

  
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    DANC 242 - Theory and Practice of Ballet, Fall

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: Ballet experience. Students may self-select.
    This course gives students with an elementary level of training the opportunity to establish, develop and refine classical ballet technique. Emphasis is on correct placement, line and execution. In addition, through out-of-class research students will obtain general background about ballet, which combined with intensive class work, is intended to create dancers technically proficient and artistically enriched. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly. (Formerly DANP 242, PHED 242)

  
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    DANC 245 - Theory and Practice of Ballet, Spring

    (2 credits)
    This course gives students with an intermediate-level of training the opportunity to establish, develop and refine classical ballet technique. Emphasis is on correct placement, line and execution. An analytical approach to the relation between muscle control and technique is used to intensify the effectiveness of training. In addition, through out-of-class research students will obtain general background about ballet which, combined with intensive class work, is intended to create dancers technically proficient and artistically enriched. The class is a continuation of topics addressed in DANC 242 (formerly DANP 242) but is not dependent on being taken in sequence. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly. (Formerly DANP 245, PHED 245)

  
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    DANC 247 - Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Spring

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: Dance experience. Students may self-select.
    This course will offer intermediate-level work in the technique and performance of jazz dance. It will also provide a historical overview of jazz dance and some of its most influential artists, so that students gain an understanding of the origins of jazz dance, its various styles and influences and how it differs from other dance forms. In addition to the art and technique of dance being practiced and performed in class, various other assignments will be required, including reading and writing assignments and critiques of video and live performances. The class is a continuation of topics addressed in DANC 237 (formerly DANP 237) but is not dependent on being taken in sequence. This course may be repeated once for credit. One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly. Offered spring semester. (Formerly DANP 247, PHED 247)

  
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    DANC 248 - Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Fall

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: Dance experience. Students may self-select.
    This course will offer intermediate-level work in the technique and performance of modern dance. It will also provide a historical overview of modern dance and some of its most influential artists, so that students gain an understanding of the origins of modern dance, its various styles and influences and how it differs from other dance forms. In addition to the art and technique of dance being practiced and performed in class, various other assignments will be required, including reading and writing assignments and critiques of video and live performances. This course may be repeated once for credit. One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly. (Formerly DANP 248, PHED 248)

  
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    DANC 249 - Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Spring

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: Dance experience. Students may self-select.
    This course will offer intermediate-level work in the technique and performance of modern dance. It will also provide a historical overview of modern dance and some of its most influential artists, so that students gain an understanding of the origins of modern dance, its various styles and influences and how it differs from other dance forms. In addition to the art and technique of dance being practiced and performed in class, various other assignments will be required, including reading and writing assignments and critiques of video and live performances. The class is a continuation of topics addressed in DANC 248 (formerly DANP 248) but is not dependent on being taken in sequence. This course may be repeated once for credit. One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly. (Formerly DANP 249, PHED 249)

  
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    DANC 251 - Dance History

    (3 credits)
    This course will investigate the development of western theatrical dance from Ancient Greece to contemporary American choreographers. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the rich history of dance in its social, political and historical context. This course will focus on the development of western theatrical dance through an exploration of prominent individuals, artistic trends and the continuing development of dance technique. Formerly THEA 251 (CFPA; CWRT)

  
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    DANC 254 - Science and Theory of Dance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculated in the dance education concentration or dance minor
    This course will be an investigation of the basic science and compositional theory of dance as an art form. Dance education concentration students and minors will study human anatomy and biomechanics of dance to become knowledgeable about safe and efficient movement in dance. Students will learn the basic theories of dance composition, including investigations of movement, space, force and time as a foundation for choreography. Students will employ this knowledge in short compositions and in critical analysis for dance as an art form. Offered either semester.

  
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    DANC 255 - Creative Dance

    (3 credits)
    This course investigates the theory of dance through participation, composition, lecture, discussion and film. Students learn about the elements of space, time, force, movement and style. (Formerly PHED/THEA 255) (CFPA)

  
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    DANC 256 - Dance Composition

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: DANC 254 or DANC 255
    This class investigates the use of basic elements of dance to form a movement composition. Students will perform exercises in choreography and experience setting a dance for performance. Offered spring semester. (Formerly PHED/THEA 256)

  
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    DANC 259 - Dance Repertory

    (1 credit)
    Students are taught a major choreographic work and rehearse it for performance. Offered spring semester. (Formerly PHED/THEA 259)

  
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    DANC 260 - World Dance

    (3 credits)
    This course is an introductory overview to some of the major dance traditions of the world, with emphasis on Asia, the Pacific, Africa and the Arctic. Offered once yearly. (Formerly PHED/THEA 260) (CFPA; CGCL)

  
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    DANC 263 - Dance History to 1915

    (3 credits)
    Dance History to 1915 will investigate the development of Western theatrical dance from ancient civilization through Diaghilev’s Ballet Russe, including Romantic and Classical ballet. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the rich history of dance in its social, political and historical contexts. The course will focus on the development of Western theatrical dance through an exploration of prominent individuals, artistic trends and the continuing development of dance technique. (Formerly PHED/THEA 263) (CFPA)

  
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    DANC 264 - Dance History from 1915

    (3 credits)
    Dance History from 1915 will investigate the development of Western theatrical dance from the end of Diaghilev’s Ballet Russe period to contemporary American choreographers, including Martha Graham, George Balanchine and Alvin Ailey. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the rich history of dance in its social, political and historical contexts. The course will focus on the development of Western theatrical dance through an exploration of prominent individuals, artistic trends and the continuing development of dance technique. (Formerly PHED/THEA 264) (CFPA)

  
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    DANC 271 - Theory and Practice of Tap Dance

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: Dance experience. Students may self-select.
    This course will offer intermediate-level work in the technique and performance of tap dance. It will also provide a historical overview of tap dance and some of its most influential artists, so that students gain an understanding of the origins of tap dance, its various styles and influences and how it differs from other dance forms. In addition to the art and technique of dance being practiced and performed in class, various other assignments will be required, including reading and writing assignments and critiques of video and live performances. This course may be repeated once for credit. One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly. (Formerly DANP 271, PHED 271)

  
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    DANC 298 - Second Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    DANC 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    DANC 345 - Theory and Practice of Advanced Ballet Technique

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    This course is for students with extensive ballet experience. The course will emphasize an awareness of alignment, advanced ballet vocabulary, pointe work, and advanced ballet pedagogy. Advanced ballet follows a traditional ballet structure: barre, center adagio, petit allegro and grand allegro. May be repeated twice. Offered either semester.

  
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    DANC 349 - Theory and Practice of Advanced Modern Technique

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    This course is for students with previous modern dance experience and a serious interest in challenging themselves and expanding their dance skills. The course will cover advanced terminology and principles of modern dance technique. The course will emphasize an awareness of alignment, modern dance vocabulary, musicality, creativity, performance quality and dynamic nuance. Partnering skills will be introduced. May be repeated twice. Offered either semester.

  
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    DANC 353 - Creative Dance for Children

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: DANP 281 or consent of instructor
    The study and experience of dance as a creative art activity for children is covered in this course. This course is for those planning to work with children in schools, camps, community centers or enrichment programs. (Formerly PHED/THEA 353)

  
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    DANC 357 - Dance Production Theory

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: DANC 254 and DANC 256; or consent of instructor
    This course provides the opportunity to choreograph and plan the presentation of a major dance work. Lectures and practical assignments in choreography and stagecraft for dance result in a plan for a dance piece. Offered fall semester. (Formerly PHED/THEA 357)

  
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    DANC 358 - Dance Production Techniques

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: DANC 255 and DANC 256 and DANC 357; or consent of instructor
    This class is a continuation of DANC 357. The class provides the opportunity to set choreography created in DANC 357 on dancers, create costumes and perform theater technical tasks to produce a dance concert. Offered spring semester. (Formerly PHED/THEA 358)

  
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    DANC 359 - Dance Ensemble Practicum

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    The Dance Ensemble is a pre-professional college company that prepares students technically to perform at various events including competitions and other dance productions. The Dance Ensemble also has a community outreach component, in which the company plans and orchestrates workshops with local schools and other institutions. Admittance to the Dance Ensemble is by audition only and is for the serious dancer and dance educator. Students who participate in the Dance Ensemble must commit to rehearsals, performances, fundraisers, outreach projects and group events. Students must be either concurrently enrolled in DANC 155 or commit to technical support of its concert.  May be repeated a total of five times. (Formerly THEA 359)

  
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    DANC 399 - Topical Studies in Dance

    (3 credits)
    The class will offer variable contemporary topics in dance, such as reconstructions of artistic works. This course may be repeated for different topics. Offered as topics arise.

  
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    DANC 452 - Ballet Pedagogy

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: DANC 242 and DANC 245; or consent of instructor
    The course is based on fundamental ballet technique – the foundation of all dance training. It is intended to prepare the prospective dance teacher with the skills with which to provide safe and accurate dance training. (Formerly THEA 452)

  
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    DANC 453 - Dance Methodology

    (3 credits)
    Prospective teachers of dance will learn the various methods of teaching modern dance, jazz, and tap dance as well as social, folk and square dance and improvisation and composition. Emphasis will be on safe and correct techniques of teaching dance. Practical experiences in teaching will accompany lectures and discussion. (Formerly THEA 453)

  
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    DANC 494 - Seminar in Dance Education

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in the Dance Education Concentration
    The Seminar in Dance Education is a capstone course that will create a bridge for graduating majors between their college education and the professional world and satisfy the major writing intensive requirement. This course will address contemporary issues in both the public and private sectors in dance education. Students will investigate resources in the professional community and build connections to nonprofit organizations that serve dance in the region. Students will also learn how to write professional resumes, build a portfolio and develop their grant writing skills. (CWRM)

  
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    DANC 497 - Advanced Individual Projects in Dance

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Junior standing; consent of faculty supervisor; additional prerequisites dependent on topic; and formal application required
    The student contracts with faculty to explore learning activities of a creative nature beyond the scope of regular course offerings. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours. Offered either semester.

  
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    DANC 498 - Internship in Dance

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of department; 2.5 overall GPA; formal application required
    The internship provides an opportunity for junior and senior dance students to gain practical expertise in the fields of dance instruction or administration by participating in an off-campus work study experience that complements their academic preparation. Only three credits may be applied towards the dance concentration.  This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

  
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    DANC 499 - Directed Study in Dance

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.


Dance - Physical Education

  
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    DANP 153 - Jazz Dance

    (1 credit)
    This course provides experiences with a variety of jazz styles, including lyric and percussive. Emphasis is on performance of choreographed routines and mastery of isolations and syncopations. (Formerly PHED 153)

  
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    DANP 159 - Latin Social Dance

    (1 credit)
    This course will offer an introduction to the major dances of the Caribbean: Mambo (commonly known as Salsa), Merengue, Cha Cha and the internationally popular tango. This course will cover the basic steps, patterns, history and cultural significance of each dance. These dances will be taught in the modern style that is now popular in social settings.

  
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    DANP 161 - Folk Dance

    (1 credit)
    This course will introduce folk dance terminology, formations and dance steps. Course will include insight into the background and customs of the people in the countries where the dances originated. (Formerly PHED 161)

  
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    DANP 164 - Square and Contra Dance

    (1 credit)
    This course is an introduction to contemporary square dance and contra dance. (Formerly PHED 164)

  
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    DANP 165 - Tap Dance I

    (1 credit)
    This course will explore the basic skills of tap dance using physical practice analysis, film critiques and performance. Basic tap vocabulary will be mastered. (Formerly PHED 165)

  
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    DANP 166 - African Dance

    (1 credit)
    This course will introduce students to the dance styles of Africa and the Caribbean using the Dunham techniques as its technical base. There will be discussion of the cultural history of African and Caribbean styles and their effect on American dance. (Formerly PHED 166)

  
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    DANP 167 - Hip-Hop Dance

    (1 credit)
    The course will present the basic technique of hip-hop dance. (Formerly PHED 167)

  
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    DANP 168 - Ballroom Dance

    (1 credit)
    This course will introduce students to the basic steps, rhythms and timing and performance. Dances covered will include the waltz, fox trot, swing, polka and a sampler of Latin dances. (Formerly PHED 168)

  
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    DANP 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills, while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    DANP 235 - Rhythmic Activities: Programming for All Ages

    (1 credit)
    This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of rhythmical movements and their application for programming for all age groups. The course will include a variety of expressive locomotion, non-locomotor and manipulative movements. (Formerly PHED 235)

  
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    DANP 259 - Theory and Practice of Latin Social Dance

    (2 credits)
    This semester-long course will offer an introduction to the major dances of the Caribbean: Mambo and Guaracha (both commonly known as Salsa), Merengue, Cha Cha Cha and Bachata. These dances will be taught in the modern style that is now popular in social settings. There will be a focus on the concepts of lead and follow, step patterns and turn patterns. Throughout, the instructor will integrate a discussion of the historical and cultural significance of these dances and how they have come to enjoy a worldwide following.

  
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    DANP 268 - Ballroom Dance II - Theory, Practice and Performance

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: DANP 168 or consent of instructor
    This course will be a continuation of the theory, practice and performance of ballroom dance. Intermediate theory, practice and performance of the swing, tango, Cha Cha, waltz, fox trot and selected Latin dances will be covered. (Formerly PHED 268)

  
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    DANP 281 - Theory and Practice of Educational Dance

    (2 credits)
    This course will involve students in creative/expressive dance using Laban’s Movement Framework as a basis for content. Knowledge of this content will give students a foundation for dance teaching in all settings. Additionally, students will have an opportunity to choreograph dance sequences both individually and in small groups. The intent is for both the non‑dancer and the trained dancer to be comfortable in the creative environment. Offered fall semester. (Formerly PHED 281)

  
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    DANP 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking‑intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    DANP 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    DANP 499 - Directed Study in Dance - Physical Education

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to all juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.


Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECED 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    ECED 230 - The Basics of Early Childhood Education

    (3 credits)
    This foundation course examines early childhood education (birth through grade 2) from a variety of perspectives including historical, sociocultural and developmental. A 40-hour, field-based experience is attached to this course. This field-based experience is used to contextualize topics and issues including typical and atypical child development, learning theories, diversity, develop-mentally-appropriate practices, teaching models and approaches, professional teaching standards and critical issues related to teaching and child growth and development. This course prepares students to apply for admission into both the teaching licensure and Early Education and Care programs.

  
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    ECED 280 - Creative Techniques in Early Childhood

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ECED 230 or ELED 220; and ELED 120 or PSYC 224
    The course prepares teachers of very young children in techniques that are developmentally appropriate. Students will learn instructional strategies that incorporate the various movement, visual, performance and language arts into early childhood projects, activities and routines, both within the classroom and in community settings. (Formerly ECED 380)

  
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    ECED 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or_ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    ECED 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    ECED 300 - Early Childhood Art Methods

    (.5 credit)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and passing scores on all appropriate MTEL®: Communication and Literacy, Foundations of Reading and Early Childhood
    This course is an introduction to methods and materials in art for the early childhood teacher. Art projects typical of those done by children grades PreK-2 are produced. Classroom management, bulletin board design and lesson introduction techniques are explored. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

  
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    ECED 311 - Science and Social Studies Inquiry for the Young Child

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and passing scores on all appropriate MTEL®: Communication and Literacy, Foundations of Reading and Early Childhood
    The major concepts and process skills in science and social studies will be experienced in this course and emphasis will be on the learning environment. Students will learn how to help children move from specific information toward general statements, concepts and generalizations in an inductive process using convergent and divergent thinking.

  
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    ECED 332 - Reading Development for the Young Child

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and passing scores on all appropriate MTEL®: Communication and Literacy, Foundations of Reading and Early Childhood
    In this course, early childhood majors will learn how to create the conditions that facilitate the acquisition of literacy. The roles of print processing strategies, guided reading experiences and voluntary, independent reading are explored along with the relationship between reading and writing. Prepracticum experiences include reading aloud, shared book experiences and teaching guided reading lessons.

  
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    ECED 342 - Language Arts for the Young Child

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and passing scores on all appropriate MTEL®: Communication and Literacy, Foundations of Reading and Early Childhood
    In this course, through the use of an integrated approach of content, the student will develop strategies for the teaching of language arts, which build on the relation of thought and word and the changes in that process that develop competencies in listening, speaking, writing and reading as a union of word and thought. (CWRM)

  
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    ECED 352 - Developmental Mathematics for the Young Child

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and passing scores on all appropriate MTEL®: Communication and Literacy, Foundations of Reading and Early Childhood
    In this course, through the use of an integrated approach of content, the student will develop strategies in math that are concept-oriented in which the primary emphasis is on thinking, reasoning and understanding with an emphasis on developing in young children the ability to investigate how and why things happen in math. In a prepracticum experience the student will teach a series of lessons in math at the primary level.

 

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