Aug 18, 2022  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Aviation Science

  
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    AVSC 210 - Aviation Weather

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 110 or private pilot certificate or consent of instructor
    This course enhances the basic weather theory introduced in primary flight theory courses and makes a comprehensive examination of how to evaluate and interpret the many different types of weather products and services available from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The student will learn each of the major weather products designed for aviation use and how best to use and integrate them for aeronautical decision-making and flight planning. Offered annually.

  
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    AVSC 211 - Commercial Pilot Ground School

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 100 or AVSC 108
    Subject matter involves advanced treatment of the airplane systems, performance and control, the National Airspace System, Federal Aviation Regulations, meteorology, radio navigation and the physiology of flight. Students who meet Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements will be qualified to take the FAA written examination. Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 212 - Instrument Pilot Ground School

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 108 and AVSC 111
    Topics include discussion of aircraft environmental control systems and commercial flight planning, study of instrument flight charts, IFR departure, enroute and approach procedures. FARs and IFR Flight Planning. Students who meet Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements will be qualified to take the FAA written examination. Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 215 - Single Engine Flight Simulator Instruction

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 105 or AVSC 111
    Single engine flight simulated instruction is conducted with the use of a flight simulator located at the New Bedford airport. The course content will be determined in accordance with the flight experience of the student. A student must enroll for a minimum of one credit. The course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. (Fifteen hours of instruction are required for one credit.) Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 217 - Air Traffic Control

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 108 and AVSC 111
    This course is a study of the U.S. air traffic control system as it exists today. Topics of discussion will include: history of air traffic control, navigation systems, ATC system structure, ATC operational procedures, both radar and non-radar environments, oceanic and international air traffic control, and current problems associated with the ATC system. Fieldtrips to ATC facilities will be scheduled subject to student scheduling limitations. Offered fall semester.

  
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    AVSC 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to all Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in aviation allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester.

  
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    AVSC 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to all Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in aviation allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester.

  
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    AVSC 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    AVSC 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    AVSC 300 - Commercial Flight

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 200; and AVSC 211, which may be taken concurrently
    Lessons include a review of basic flight maneuvers, as well as concentrated instruction and solo proficiency practice in precision flight maneuvers. Introduction to flight in complex aircraft, experience in night and cross-country flying, with altitude instrument flying. This course also consists of a complete review of all commercial maneuvers, instrument flying techniques, procedures and regulations. The Commercial Flight course prepares the student for FAA Commercial Pilot and Instrument ratings. Additional fees required.

  
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    AVSC 303 - Flight Instructor Ground School

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 200 and AVSC 212 and AVSC 300 and AVSC 211
    This course provides aviation instructors with easily understood learning and teaching information and its use in their task of conveying aeronautical knowledge and skills to students. Topics include aspects of human behavior, teaching methods and communication, evaluation and criticism, instructional planning, instructor characteristics and responsibilities. Students who meet Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements will be qualified to take the FAA written examination. Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 305 - Introduction to General Aviation Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 130 and junior status; or consent of instructor
    This course is an in-depth study of Fixed Base Operations (FBO) business management and operations including financial aspects, human resources, MIS, flight line, flight operations, marketing, maintenance and facilities. Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 307 - Air Carrier Operations

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MGMT 130 and junior status; or consent of instructor
    This course is an in-depth study of the U.S. air carrier industry, its structure and its place in the aerospace industry. The history, economics, management and regulation of the domestic air carrier industry are examined in detail. Offered fall semester.

  
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    AVSC 310 - Aviation Safety

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 100; or AVSC 105 and AVSC 108; or AVSC 111
    The primary emphasis of this course is to instill safety consciousness. It encompasses the role of federal organizations involved with aviation safety and stresses their contributions to the aerospace industry. The course will explore flight physiology, utilization of aeronautical services and facilities, a historical perspective and analyzing documented case studies. Offered spring semester.

  
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    AVSC 316 - Multi-Engine Flight Simulator Instruction

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 413 or consent of instructor
    Multi-engine flight simulated instruction is conducted with the use of a flight simulator at the New Bedford airport. The course content will be determined in accordance with the flight experience of the student. Students must enroll for a minimum of one credit. The course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. (Fifteen hours of instruction are required for one credit.) Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 320 - Aviation Regulatory Process

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: AVSC 111 and junior status; or consent of instructor
    This course is a study of the development of the United States aviation regulatory process, its current structure, the rule-making process, the appeals process, ICAO, etc., as well as an exposure to current aviation law as it applies to aviators and operators in the airspace system. Offered either semester. (CWRM)

  
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    AVSC 330 - Aircraft Systems

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: AVSC 211 and junior status; or consent of instructor
    This course is an examination of current aircraft systems moving from the more elementary systems found in smaller general aviation aircraft to the more complex systems found in current turbine powered transport category aircraft. These systems will include power plant, electrical, flight control, air conditioning and pressurization, ice and rain protection, oxygen, avionics and emergency equipment. Offered fall semester.

  
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    AVSC 399 - Special Topics in Aviation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 105
    This course will cover timely and important aviation issues not offered in other courses. Topics will change semester by semester and will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated with permission of department.

  
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    AVSC 400 - Instructional Flight

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 200 and AVSC 211 and AVSC 212 and AVSC 300; and AVSC 303, which may be taken concurrently
    This course includes analysis of flight maneuvers, take-offs, landings, stalls, emergencies and procedures, as well as analysis and practice instruction of advanced maneuver, altitude instrument flying, considerations of night flight, aircraft performance, cross-country flight and navigation. Practice flight and ground instruction. It prepares the student for the FAA Certified Flight Instructor rating. Additional fees required.

  
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    AVSC 402 - Insurance and Risk Management in Aviation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 305
    This course is a practical study of U.S. regulations governing aviation and a survey of appropriate risk management policies of aviation. The case method is employed to present practical applications of principles under consideration. Offered fall semester.

  
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    AVSC 407 - Aviation Marketing Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 111 and AVSC 305
    Selling and pricing business aviation services and creative marketing strategy are studied in an analytical approach to advertising, sales force administration, promotion, distribution, retailing, logistics, wholesaling, product planning, price policies, market research and consumer behavior. Offered spring semester.

  
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    AVSC 410 - Aviation Safety Management Systems

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 310 or consent of instructor
    Knowledge of Safety Management Systems is required by the FAA for air carriers, airports and other certificate holders. This course is designed to teach the student the essential components of a Safety Management System, the quality management underpinnings of SMS, and the methods required to integrate modern safety risk management and safety assurance concepts into standardized, proactive systems. Offered annually.

  
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    AVSC 411 - Instrument Flight Instructor Ground School

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 300 and AVSC 211; and AVSC 303, which may be taken concurrently
    Techniques of teaching instrument flight, analysis of instrument maneuvers and approaches, enroute operations and lesson planning are covered. This course will prepare students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) instrument flight and ground instructor written examinations.

  
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    AVSC 412 - Instrument Flight Instructor Flight Training

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 411, which may be taken concurrently
    Teaching analysis of altitude instruments, instrument approaches, and enroute operations are covered. This course will prepare students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) practical test. Two two-hour lecture/demonstration periods weekly for one quarter. Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 413 - Multi-Engine Rating Ground School

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 211 and AVSC 300
    This course prepares the prospective multi-engine pilot for the flight portion of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) multi-engine certification, including an in-depth study of multi-engine aerodynamics, systems, weight and balance, performance and emergencies.

  
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    AVSC 414 - Multi-Engine Flight Training

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 413
    This course prepares the prospective multi-engine pilot for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) multi-engine flight test. It includes multi-engine maneuvers, systems, weight and balance and emergencies. Two one-hour lecture/demonstration periods weekly for one quarter. Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 416 - Multi-Engine Instructor Ground School

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 303 and AVSC 400 and AVSC 413 and AVSC 414
    This course involves techniques of teaching multi-engine flight, multi-engine operations and systems, aerodynamics of multi-engiine flight, environmental systems and multi-engine airplane instruction. One two-hour lecture/demonstration period weekly.

  
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    AVSC 417 - Multi-Engine Instructor Flight Training

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 303 and AVSC 400 and AVSC 413 and AVSC 414; and AVSC 416, which may be taken concurrently
    This course covers the development of aeronautical skill and experience in multi-engine aircraft as well as acquisition of teaching proficiency from right seat of multi-engine airplane. One two-hour lecture/demonstration period weekly for one quarter. Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 450 - Human Factors in Aviation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 310 and junior status; or consent of instructor
    This course provides a study in the “human aspects” that affect the interaction of man with machine and technology in the aviation environment. Topics will include analysis of human/machine interfaces in the aircraft design environment, in the cockpit environment and in the air traffic control environment.

  
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    AVSC 471 - Aviation Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: AVSC 307 and AVSC 402 and AVSC 407 and senior status; or consent of instructor
    This capstone course uses the tools and concepts mastered in each of the previous aviation courses to look at current business problems and topics related to the aviation industry. (CWRM)

  
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    AVSC 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    One-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    AVSC 498 - Internship in Aviation Science

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson of aviation science; formal application required
    The internship is an instructive endeavor in the aviation industry or an aviation related business, which complements the academic program. The student will receive meaningful and practical work experience conducted at an airline, a Fixed Base Operation (FBO), the FAA, an aviation consulting firm or other aviation related firms. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Offered either semester.

  
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    AVSC 499 - Directed Study in Aviation Science

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Junior status and consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to junior and senior majors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.


Biological Sciences

  
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    BIOE 511 - Advanced Biological Topics and Techniques

    (1-3 credits)
    Designed for secondary education science teachers, this course is composed of three one credit “short courses.” Short course topics will vary and will also serve the continuing needs of teachers for professional development. Possible topics could include whales of Massachusetts, isolation of plasmids, fungal genetics, spring migratory birds, freshwater macroinvertebrates of local ponds and streams, New England wetland plants, intertidal invertebrates, New England wildflowers, etc. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
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    BIOE 514 - Advances in Biomedical/Physiological Biology

    (3 or 4 credits)
    This graduate-level course designed for secondary education science teachers will cover subject areas of biomedical and physiological biology. Possible subject area components could include embryology, parasitology, neurobiology and advanced physiology. This course may be repeated for different topics. Laboratory may be included.

  
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    BIOE 515 - Advances in Ecological/Environmental Biology

    (3 or 4 credits)
    Designed for secondary education science teachers, this course will cover subject areas in ecological and environmental biology. This course may be repeated for different topics. Laboratory may be included.

  
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    BIOL 100 - General Principles of Biology

    (4 credits)
    The biological principles at the cellular and organismal levels are discussed. The topics covered include cell structure, respiration, photosynthesis, osmosis, enzymes, DNA and protein synthesis, genetics, ecology and evolution. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered every semester. (CNSL)

  
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    BIOL 102 - Introduction to Zoology

    (4 credits)
    This course considers the zoological aspects of biology with emphasis on human systems. Topics include the chemical basis of life, the structure and physiology of cells, tissues, organs and organ-systems, embryonic development, heredity, evolution and ecology. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered every semester. (CNSL)

  
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    BIOL 110 - Biology: A Human Approach

    (3 credits)
    This course examines biological principles as they apply to the human biology and to the role of humans in nature. A study of different levels of organization leads to analysis of the structure and function of the major systems of the human body. Topics will include human heredity, evolution and ecology. (CNSN)

  
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    BIOL 117 - Environmental Biology

    (4 credits)
    Ecological relationships and current environmental issues are explored in class with a focus on how biological systems function and what impacts humans have had on global biodiversity. Class discussions and short video clips from Nature, CNN and CBC news explore the human impact on harvesting renewable and nonrenewable resources, biogeochemical cycles, human population growth, threats to endangered species, global climate change, sustainable use of renewable resources and local impacts on global biodiversity. Class discussions, laboratory exercises and team projects highlight examples taken from outside the United States and particularly case studies drawn from Canada and regions of Southeast Asia. Laboratory exercises emphasize making observations and using quantitative reasoning to study effects of environmental factors on organisms; using computer models to study harvest impacts on world fisheries; and case studies to examine water use and world health issues. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory weekly. Offered every semester. (CNSL)

  
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    BIOL 121 - General Biology I

    (4 credits)
    Corequisite: BIOL 150. Prerequisite: MATH 140/140E or MATH 141 or MATH 142 or MATH 150 or MATH 161/161E, any of which may be taken concurrently; or mathematics placement test; or consent of department chairperson. Restricted to majors in biology, chemistry and computer science; and minors in biology.
    This core course in the Biology major is an introduction to the concepts of molecular and cellular biology, reproduction, metabolism, genetics and mechanisms of evolution. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered fall semester. (CNSL)

  
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    BIOL 122 - General Biology II

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-” or equivalent
    This course is a survey of the major groups of organisms, their morphology, physiology, evolution and ecology. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered spring semester.

  
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    BIOL 128 - The Biology of Human Sexuality

    (3 credits)
    The Biology of Human Sexuality is designed to introduce students to the basics of the human reproductive system. Students will develop a healthy understanding of sexuality, its role in society and how it applies to our daily life. Three hours of lecture per week. (CNSN)

  
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    BIOL 135 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in biology allow exceptionally able students to explore challenging topics in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered fall semester.

  
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    BIOL 150 - Biology for Life

    (1 credit)
    Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with BIOL 121
    This applied course is a companion course for BIOL 121 - General Biology I  and is required of all biology majors and minors concurrently taking BIOL 121. Other students enrolled in BIOL 121 are strongly encouraged to take this course. This course will highlight the key concepts discussed in lecture in a friendly environment and reinforce strategies to help students use and retain this information. This fun and exciting course is designed to develop and strengthen the skill sets students need to excel in college (targeting the sciences in particular) and not to just survive college. Under faculty supervision, each section will include Peer Mentors to demonstrate proper note-taking, study skills, testing strategies, and to assist in class assignments and projects. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered fall semester.

  
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    BIOL 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
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    BIOL 200 - Cell Biology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-” or equivalent; and BIOL 122 with a minimum grade of “C-” which may be taken concurrently; and CHEM 131 with a minimum grade of “C-” or CHEM 141 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and CHEM 132 or CHEM 142 which may be taken concurrently; or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts in cell structure and cell physiology. Topics will include the function of cellular organelles, enzymes and cell metabolism, the synthesis of macromolecules and the flow of genetic information in the cell, including transcription and translation. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered spring semester.

  
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    BIOL 225 - General Ecology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 122 with a minimum grade of C-“; or consent of instructor
    Fundamentals of the interactions of populations, communities and ecosystems are investigated in lecture. Students will be acquainted with techniques of data gathering and analysis in ecology. Laboratory trips will allow students to investigate ecological communities in Southeastern Massachusetts. One all day Saturday field trip will be required as part of the laboratory. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered fall semester.

  
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    BIOL 251 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or BIOL 102 with a minimum grade of “B-”; or BIOL 121 or BIOL 122 with a minimum grade of “C-”; or consent of instructor
    This course is an intensive study of the biochemistry and cellular structures of tissues; the integumentary, skeletal and muscle systems; joints, fundamentals of the nervous system; the peripheral, central and autonomic nervous systems and the special senses. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Offered fall semester.

  
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    BIOL 252 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or BIOL 102 with a minimum grade of “B-“; or BIOL 121 or BIOL 122 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 251 with a minimum grade of “C-“; or consent of instructor
    This course is an intensive study of the structure and function of the heart, circulatory system and blood; and the organ systems including lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, digestive and reproductive systems. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Offered spring semester.

  
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    BIOL 284 - Invertebrate Zoology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 122 with a minimum grade of “C-” or equivalent; or consent of instructor
    This course covers the biology of invertebrates from a phylogenetic standpoint with emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, physiology, development and natural history. Representatives of the principal classes of each phylum are studied. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. In alternate spring semesters, either BIOL 284 or BIOL 382 will be offered.

  
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    BIOL 293 - Service-Learning in Biology

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least two biology courses, and either a minimum GPA in biology of 2.5 or a cumulative GPA of 2.5 and consent of the department
    Service-learning includes community based experiences such as laboratory or occupational experience in conservation with state or local agencies as well as industrial, allied health, educational, medical, governmental, recreational or regulatory experience with other organizations outside of the university. This course is a pre-internship experience designed to combine fieldwork with service for a total of 40 hours. Students will meet periodically with the course instructor to reflect on experiences and connect with curriculum content. No more than three credits may be used toward the biology major electives. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
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    BIOL 297 - Biometry

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 141 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 161 with a minimum grade of “C-” or MATH 161E with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-“; or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to the general principles and use of statistical analyses in the biological sciences. Topics include probability theory, characterization of data with descriptive statistics, sampling error, elements of experimental design, and hypothesis testing, emphasizing the philosophy and assumptions of statistical analysis as well as the mechanics. The course uses SPSS as a computing tool and will require a final project. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. (CQUR)

  
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    BIOL 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit (CSYS)

  
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    BIOL 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    BIOL 321 - Genetics

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and CHEM 131 and CHEM 132, or CHEM 141 and CHEM 142; or consent of instructor
    This course presents an analysis of the basic principles underlying heredity and the mechanisms involved in the replication, recombination, mutation, variation and expression of genetic material in representative plant, animal and microbial systems. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered fall semester.

  
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    BIOL 325 - Ichthyology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and CHEM 131 or CHEM 141 taken previously or concurrently; or consent of instructor
    Lecture presentations in ichthyology will examine the key aspects of anatomy, sensory systems, organ systems, physiology and ecology of fishes. Emphasis will be placed on identification of New England freshwater and coastal fishes. Field investigations will focus on the behavior and ecology of the fish populations in the Taunton River system. Laboratory sessions will also include techniques of age and growth analysis for assessment of local fish populations, and basic identification of external and internal anatomy of various teleosts. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.

  
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    BIOL 327 - Wetlands Ecology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    This course is an examination of the composition, structure, function and value of wetland ecosystems in North America. The course constitutes a comparative analysis of characteristic biota and adaptations, hydrological and geochemical processes, and conservation strategies of wetlands through lecture, discussion, field work and direct experimentation. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered alternate fall semesters.

  
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    BIOL 328 - Stream Ecology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 140/140E or MATH 150; and MATH 141 or MATH 161/161E; and BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and CHEM 131 or CHEM 141, which may be taken concurrently; or consent of instructor
    This course examines factors affecting the population size and distribution of aquatic organisms in streams and the biotic indices used to assess stream communities. Laboratory and field projects apply basic skills of organism identification, biotic indices and GIS to investigate aquatic communities of a local river. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Offered every other year in the fall semester. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 329 - Winter Ecology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-” and consent of instructor
    This course evaluates the adaptations that plants and animals use to survive winters similar to New England. Topics will include behavioral and physiological changes for winter, identifying niches in the winter landscape, understanding the natural history of New England, orienteering, field sampling and animal tracking. The field component of the lab will also have a service project incorporated. Three hours of lecture weekly and an extended field-based laboratory with residence at an off-campus location over winter break. Additional fee required. Offered alternate fall semesters.

  
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    BIOL 341 - Plant Physiology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 122 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and CHEM 131 and CHEM 132, or CHEM 141 and CHEM 142; or consent of instructor
    This course covers the growth and function of plants including cellular physiology, water relations, respiration, photosynthesis, nutrition, growth regulation and the influence of environment. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered fall semester. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 350 - Molecular Biology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-”
    This course will examine the molecular nature of biological processes. The structure and function of biological macromolecules will be examined along with the research methodologies and techniques currently utilized in this field. Three hours of lecture and one, three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered fall semester.

  
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    BIOL 355 - Biology Study Tour

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Completion of XXXX199 First Year Seminar and at least one science course; or consent of instructor. Other prerequisites dependent upon itinerary
    Topics in biology are studied at field sites, laboratories and related venues at a biologically unique location abroad or otherwise away from campus. Preparatory class work is conducted on campus prior to travel, and assignments are completed upon return. The course may be repeated once for different itineraries. (CGCL)

  
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    BIOL 360 - Biological Clocks

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-” or BIOL 251 with a minimum grade of “C-“; or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of biological oscillations. The course will provide an understanding of the behavioral, genetic and anatomical aspects of the endogenous biological clock. An explanation of how circadian rhythms regulate and mediate cellular, behavioral and physiological processes of organisms will occur. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 371 - Histology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-”
    This course is a study of the microscopic anatomy of mammalian tissues and organs with emphasis on human materials. The study of prepared slides in the laboratory will serve as a basis for discussion of the interdependence of structure and function in the animal body. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly.

  
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    BIOL 373 - Animal Physiology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 122 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and CHEM 131 and CHEM 132, or CHEM 141 and CHEM 142; or equivalent or consent of instructor
    Physiological principles concerned in irritability, contraction, circulation, gas exchange, excretion and hormonal regulation are studied. Special focus will be placed on unique physiological features found in a variety of animals. Topics will vary and may include hibernation, echolocation, communication through pheromones, bioluminescence and migration. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered alternate spring semesters. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 374 - Cancer Biology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 252 with a minimum grade of “C-” or BIOL 373 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course will provide a deeper understanding of the molecular, cellular and genetic basis of cancer. It will help to solidify students’ knowledge of cellular and molecular biology and will allow them to apply their general knowledge to a concrete medical problem. Emphasis will be placed on current experimental research in the field of cancer biology and its impact on the understanding of cancer. Using the problem of cancer as framework, this course will allow students to survey the most recent literature to gain a greater understanding of the genetic and environmental aspects to this complex disease. The goals are to provide a detailed introduction to modern cancer biology, with emphasis on molecular diagnosis, current research and treatments. Offered either semester. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 375 - Immunology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    The immune system and its components, including their structure, function, genetics and ontogeny are covered. Three hours of lecture weekly. Offered alternate fall semesters.

  
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    BIOL 376 - General Endocrinology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-”
    A survey of the morphology, ultrastructure, and physiology of endocrine glands and their hormones, in animals with special emphasis on humans, will be presented. The course will discuss the hormonal actions and their control on the cellular and organ level. Three hours of lecture weekly.

  
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    BIOL 382 - Comparative Chordate Anatomy

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 122 with a minimum grade of “C-” or equivalent; or consent of instructor
    An ontogenetic and phylogenetic survey of chordate gross anatomy, supplemented by laboratory dissections of representative species is presented. Emphasis is placed on ecomorphology and the changes in chordate structure and biology of chordates that comprise their evolution, with an analysis of the significance of these changes in light of our modern knowledge of evolution. Two hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. In alternate spring semesters, either BIOL 382 or BIOL 284 will be offered.

  
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    BIOL 395 - General Microbiology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-”
    An introduction to the diversity of microorganisms with emphasis on bacterial growth and metabolism, microbial ecology and host/microbe interactions including infectious disease is presented. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered spring semester. (Formerly BIOL 428) (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 396 - Research Problems in Biology

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen. Acceptance by the supervising faculty member
    The student will conduct an individual research experience over one semester or multiple semesters in collaboration with a faculty member. At the end of each semester, a written progress report must be submitted for review by the supervising faculty member and a presentation is made to the biology faculty and students. The course may be repeated and up to three credits can be used toward a concentration elective in biology.

  
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    BIOL 408 - The Biology of Marine Mammals

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 122 with a minimum grade of “C-” or equivalent; or consent of instructor
    This is an introductory course in the study of marine mammals. Topics to be covered include the evolution, classification, distribution, life histories, anatomy, morphology, behavior and ecology of marine mammals. We will consider the role of marine mammals in marine ecosystems and the interaction between marine mammals and humans. Three hours of lecture weekly. May be taken for graduate-level credit. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 413 - Medical Microbiology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 321 with a minimum grade of “C-“; or consent of instructor
    Microbes play an important role in our lives. Many of these organisms are beneficial to our existence; however, some are pathogenic causing devastating disease. This course is designed to give students an understanding of the basic biology of microbial pathogens and the mechanisms by which they cause disease. Topics to be covered include how microorganisms attach to and enter cells, how host cells are damaged by microbial pathogens and their products, how the host responds to invasion, molecular techniques utilized in diagnosing infection and disease, and the evolution of drug-resistant organisms and opportunistic pathogens. Offered fall semester.

  
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    BIOL 420 - Limnology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 121 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and CHEM 132 or CHEM 142; and MATH 140/140E or MATH 150 or MATH 141 or MATH 161/161E
    Limnology examines the interaction of physical and chemical processes in freshwater ecosystems and how they influence populations of freshwater organisms. Laboratory exercises will focus on a field project requiring sampling and analysis of water chemistry, bacteria, phytoplankton, zooplankton and macroinvertebrates. Students must expect to spend extra time outside of class on the collection and analysis of laboratory project data. Two hours of lecture and one four-hour laboratory session per week. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    BIOL 422 - Biological Evolution

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 321 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    This course covers the theory of evolution and the operation of evolutionary forces as related to modern taxonomy, with emphasis on such topics as mutation, variation, hybridization, ployploidy, isolation, natural selection and population genetics. Three hours of lecture weekly. Offered alternate years, spring semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    BIOL 423 - Invasion Ecology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    This course will examine the spread of invasive organisms. It will focus on the biology of organisms that alter ecosystems; endanger public health, local economies and traditional cultures; and their vectors of dispersal and management. Three hours of lecture weekly. Offered spring semester. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 424 - Molecular Ecology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-” and BIOL 321 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course will examine how molecular population genetics and molecular phylogenetics are applied to ecological and evolutionary questions abut natural populations. Lecture emphasizes how molecular methods have been applied to questions about adaptation, behavior, conservation, genetically modified organisms, hybridization, phylogeography and speciation. Laboratory emphasizes hands-on training in these methods and results in a capstone independent research project which combines molecular and field methods. Three hour of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered alternate spring semesters.

  
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    BIOL 425 - Population Ecology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    The dynamics and evolution of populations are examined. Topics to be covered include models in population biology, population growth, density dependent and density independent growth, population genetics, evolution of life histories, species interactions, competition, predator-prey interactions, host-parasitoid interactions, disease and pathogens, and population growth and regulation. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Offered either semester. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 430 - Embryology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-”
    This course is a study of developmental processes at different levels of organization with emphasis on animal development. Topics include gametogenesis, fertilization, early embryonic development, organogenesis, differentiation, growth and regeneration. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered alternate years, spring semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    BIOL 436 - Mammalian Reproductive Physiology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-”; plus one of the following: BIOL 252, BIOL 373; or consent of instructor
    This course is designed to introduce mammalian reproduction from a physiological perspective. The goal is to provide a functional understanding of the physiological bases for reproductive events in vertebrates, emphasizing mammals. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

  
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    BIOL 441 - Cell Signaling

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    Development and health of multicellular organisms is dependent on proper regulation of cell behaviors, most notably cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Moreover, defects in cell behavior lie at the root of many human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disease, and others. Cell behavior is regulated by various “signals” (both intra- and extracellular), which cells sense and convert into a behavioral response through a complex array of molecular interactions and events. This course will explore the molecular interactions and events through which intra- and extracellular signals modulate cell behavior. Examples of how defects in these events contribute to disease will also be discussed. Significant emphasis will be place don experimental approaches used to investigate molecular events within cells and how they drive cell behavior and disease. This will manifest through analysis of experimental data from primary literature during lecture and pursuit of a semester-long project during lab in which students examine molecular events that drive cell differentiation into neurons in response to an extracellular signal. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered alternate fall semesters. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 450 - Virology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and CHEM 131 and CHEM 132 or CHEM 141 and CHEM 142; or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to the study of viruses including bacteriophages and animal viruses. Viral structure and mechanisms of action are considered at the molecular level, and emphasis is placed on viral replication strategies. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    BIOL 460 - Toxicology Principles

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 251 or BIOL 341 or BIOL 373, any of which may be taken concurrently; and CHEM 343 which may be taken concurrently; or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals in molecular toxicology, ecotoxicology and analytical toxicology. Classes will build upon students’ previous cellular biology, molecular biology, organic chemistry, biochemistry and ecology classes and experience. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly.

  
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    BIOL 472 - Human Genetics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 321 with a minimum grade of “C-” or consent of instructor
    The course investigates general principles of genetics as applied to humans. Emphasis will be placed on human genome analysis, pedigree construction and analysis, diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases, gene mapping, cytogenetics of normal and aberrant genomes and population genetics. Three hours of lecture weekly. Offered every other year. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    BIOL 475 - Parasitology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 321 with a minimum grade of “C-“; or consent of instructor
    The relationships between parasitic microorganisms and their hosts will form the basis for this course. Protozoal and multicellular parasites of animals and plants, mechanisms of disease, host defenses and public health aspects of control and treatment will be studied. In the laboratory portion of the course, students will conduct a semester-long project investigating the interaction between a plant host and a parasitic nematode. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Offered spring semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    BIOL 482 - Neurobiology

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and BIOL 251 with a minimum grade of “C-” or BIOL 373 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and MATH 141 or MATH 161/161E; or equivalent or consent of instructor
    Nervous system ultrastructure, and the chemical and physiological properties of mammalian nerve cells will be discussed. Topics will include an examination of cell types, membrane potentials and synaptic transmission. Sensory and motor functions of nerves; reflex mechanisms; autonomic nervous functions; and central nervous system functions such as learning, memory and vision will also be covered. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered every other year. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    BIOL 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students
    One-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
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    BIOL 490 - Topics in Ecology

    (1-4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-“; other prerequisites dependent on topic; or consent of instructor
    Various specialized or experimental offerings in ecology will be offered from time to time as either three- or four-credit courses, or as short courses of one or two credits. Each course may be lecture, laboratory or combined lecture and laboratory as appropriate. Biology majors may combine three short courses to equal one elective. This course may be repeated for different topics. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
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    BIOL 491 - Topics in Environmental Biology

    (1-4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-“; other prerequisites dependent on topic; or consent of instructor
    Various specialized or experimental offerings in environmental biology will be offered from time to time as either three- or four-credit courses, or short courses of one or two credits. Each course may be lecture, laboratory or combined lecture and laboratory as appropriate. Biology majors may combine three short courses to equal one elective. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
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    BIOL 492 - Topics in Field Biology

    (1-4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 225 with a minimum grade of “C-“; other prerequisites dependent on topic; or consent of instructor
    Various specialized or experimental offerings in environmental biology will be offered from time to time as either three- or four-credit courses, or short courses of one or two credits. Each course may be lecture, laboratory or combined lecture and laboratory as appropriate. Biology majors may combine three short courses to equal one elective. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
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    BIOL 493 - Topics in Molecular Biology

    (1-4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“; other prerequisites dependent on topic; or consent of instructor
    Various specialized or experimental offerings in molecular biology will be offered from time to time as either three- or four-credit courses, or short courses of one or two credits. Each course may be lecture, laboratory or combined lecture and laboratory as appropriate. Biology majors may combine three short courses to equal one elective. This course may be repeated three times for different topics. Offered either semester.

  
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    BIOL 494 - Topics in Cellular Biology

    (1-4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“; other prerequisites dependent on topic; or consent of instructor
    Various specialized or experimental offerings in cellular biology will be offered from time to time as either three- or four-credit courses, or short courses of one or two credits. Each course may be lecture, laboratory or combined lecture and laboratory as appropriate. Biology majors may combine three short courses to equal one elective. This course may be repeated three times for different topics. Offered either semester.

  
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    BIOL 495 - Topics in Physiology

    (1-4 credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 200 with a minimum grade of “C-“; other prerequisites dependent on topic; or consent of instructor
    Various specialized or experimental offerings in physiology will be offered from time to time as either three- or four-credit courses, or short courses of one or two credits. Each course may be lecture, laboratory or combined lecture and laboratory as appropriate. Biology majors may combine three short courses to equal one elective. This course may be repeated three times for different topics. Offered either semester.

  
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    BIOL 497 - Undergraduate Biological Research

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Sophomore, junior or senior standing and acceptance by the supervising faculty member
    Students who are accepted by a faculty member as a participant in an undergraduate laboratory or field research project enroll in this course. Projects entail substantial research in the faculty member’s biological subdiscipline and are publicized as student research positions become available. Students are extensively involved in experimental planning, execution, analysis and reporting, and present their results to the biology department. Offered every semester. (CWRM)

  
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    BIOL 498 - Internship in Biology

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department
    Internships include research laboratory or occupational experience in industrial, allied health, educational, medical, governmental, recreational, regulatory or other organizations outside of the university. No more than six credits may be used toward the biology major electives. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

  
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    BIOL 499 - Directed Study in Biology

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

  
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    BIOL 502 - Research

    (3 or 6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Original research is undertaken by the graduate student in their field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    BIOL 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
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    BIOL 516 - Research Academy for Teachers

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    This course is specifically designed to train classroom teachers in a more research-based laboratory setting. The understanding of scientific processes and techniques requires intense hands-on training. This rigorous course will provide a deeper understanding of cellular, molecular or field biology and will apply cutting edge techniques using advanced instrumentation. This course will help to solidify and expand students’ basic knowledge of biology, allowing them to apply their knowledge to a concrete research problem throughout the six week course. Students will be introduced to a variety of techniques specific to biological research in specific topic areas. Through reading the primary literature, students will define a specific problem on which to focus. Subsequently, they will apply the techniques they have learned to answer their experimental question. The goal is to provide high school teachers with a research-rich laboratory experience while more deeply exploring cellular biology. May be repeated two times for a maximum of 12 credits. Offered summer session only.

 

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