Apr 19, 2024  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Political Science

  
  • POLI 506 - Public Administration Training Module

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MPA program or consent of MPA program coordinator
    As part of the 15 credit hours of elective courses (nine credits for students selecting a concentration), each MPA student must take three credit hours of PA Training Modules. These modules earn one credit each and are scheduled for either two Saturday sessions during the semester or for weekend “intensive” classes meeting for about 15 hours. Students are expected to put in appropriate out-of-class time and must successfully pass three modules covering a range of topics, including ethics in public service, managerial communication, conflict resolution, diversity in public administration, and information management, technology applications and policy. At least two of the three modules must address elements of information management, technology applications and policy. Modules will be designed to facilitate student efforts to meet this requirement. Graded on a (P) Pass/ (N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 513 - Strategic Planning and Performance Measurement in Public Administration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    Strategic planning and performance measurement guide public administrators in establishing program outcomes, in planning short-term goals, in clarifying long-term expectations and in informing and improving results for citizens and agency stake-holders. Measurement of outcomes requires understanding the relationship between resource inputs, program outputs, and objectively and subjectively measured outcomes. Theories of participation, resources management, sustainable development and research methods guide the decision-making tools presented in this class. This course will focus on mission and vision design, SWOT analysis, strategic planning, budget performance management and performance measurement. This course has a service-learning component.

  
  • POLI 514 - Organizational Planning and Assessment

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501
    This course focuses on planning and assessment tools for organizational leaders, building their ability to deliver organizational outcomes through data informed decision making. Students will expand their practical research and planning skills, including tools such as strategic planning, survey design, outcomes measurement, SWOT analysis and performance assessment. The course is designed to meet the needs of those in the non-profit concentration, for generalists and for those in the sustainability concentration in a career path in environmental organizations. Offered fall semester.

  
  • POLI 515 - Data Analysis and Presentation for Public Administration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501
    This course is designed to help student understand statistics and develop practical skills for collecting, analyzing and presenting quantitative data in a public administration/policy setting. This course will expand the student’s ability to reason quantitatively while exploring some of the critical statistical techniques that are the cornerstones of empirical analysis conducted by public administrators. Topics include descriptive statistics, analyzing crosstabs, making inferences from sample means, Chi-square, measures of association, linear regression analysis and graphic presentation of data. Students will also acquire a working knowledge of how to input and analyze data with SPSS software. Offered fall semester.

  
  • POLI 516 - Techniques of Policy Analysis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501
    This course provides a thorough introduction to the study of public policy. Its goal is to show students a systematic approach to understanding the origins, formulation, implementation and impacts of government policies. Following a review of key analytical concepts and theoretical perspectives, the political dimensions of policymaking - as well as the technical aspects of program design and evaluation - will be considered within the general framework of the “natural history” of the policymaking process. Students will also be exposed to a range of quantitative and qualitative methods as they relate to addressing policy dilemmas. Lectures and class discussions will make use of case examples drawn from a broad spectrum of policy areas. Offered fall semester.

  
  • POLI 518 - Public Policy for Public Administration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501
    This course offers students an in-depth look at the evolution of a range of policy issues. Special attention is paid to health care, Social Security, welfare, education, environmental and economic policies. The role of public administrators in designing, implementing and evaluating public policy will be a central focus on this course. The course material/readings will also touch on each branch of U.S. government as well as the distinct role of the states, and how they have influenced each of these policy areas over time. Offered fall semester.

  
  • POLI 521 - Public Finance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course covers the principal aspects of public financial management including accounting, budgeting, capital budgeting, revenue forecasting, risk management, pension management and auditing.

  
  • POLI 531 - Leadership in Human Resource Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501, which may be taken concurrently; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course focuses on selected topics in the study and practice of public personnel administration. It is designed as an in-depth analysis of the literature, problems and directions of public personnel issues. Students will develop an appreciation for the dynamic political environment as it influences human resources managers and the statutory and constitutional restrictions that distinguish public personnel management from its counterpart in the private sector.

  
  • POLI 532 - Organizational Theory and Behavior for Public and Nonprofit Institutions

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501, which may be taken concurrently; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course focuses on the types and levels of management that must be integrated in the pursuit of public sector excellence. These levels involve the behavior of individuals; pairs of individuals; supervisor/subordinate relationships; client/administrator relationships; and small groups acting under political, legal and ethical constraints. Institutional and psychological factors will be analyzed. Offered fall semester.

  
  • POLI 533 - Administrative Ethics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501, which may be taken concurrently; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course will explore the values that shape the thinking of public administrators, and the practice of dealing with moral and ethical issues in the field. The main objectives are 1) to gain familiarity with key issues in public, professional, and administrative ethics, 2) to apply ethical principles to public management and to policy analysis, and 3) to understand the nexus between formal legal and informal normative ethical imperatives.

  
  • POLI 534 - Public Service Leadership

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501, which may be taken concurrently; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course focuses on the art and science of recognizing and becoming better leaders. Students will explore various theories of leadership and develop a broader understanding of the core characteristics and competencies of excellent public service leaders. The course aims to integrate theory and practice, with a strong emphasis on assisting students in identifying their own leadership strengths and vulnerabilities. The effect of leadership on organizational and process outcomes will be a theme throughout the course, as will leaders as change agents. Peer-evaluation, mutual support, hands-on experience and public service underpin this course.

  
  • POLI 541 - Legislative-Executive Relations

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course gives students broad exposure to the relationship between legislative and executive branches of government. The course emphasizes the role of the legislature and executive branch agencies in lawmaking and budgetary processes, legislative oversight of bureaucracy, the importance of constituency service and how it impacts government agencies, legislative and bureaucratic behavioral motives and goals, the politics of bureaucratic appointments and how chief executives increase their influence over the administrative state, the influence of lobbies on government, as well as how agencies effectively mobilize constituency groups and advocate their programs.

  
  • POLI 542 - Administrative Law and Regulation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course examines that body of constitutional and statutory law that regulates how state and federal administrative agencies implement policies enacted by the legislative and executive branches of government. The course examines issues concerning the delegation of legislative power to administrative agencies; agency rulemaking and adjudication; the Administrative Procedure Act; legislative, executive, and judicial review of administrative agency actions; and issues regarding the citizen’s freedom of access to information and records of administrative agencies. A close examination is given to questions and concerns regarding the democratic legitimacy of administrative agencies, theories of regulation and regulatory policy, and how administrative agencies fit into the constitutional system of government in the United States.

  
  • POLI 543 - Executive Decision-Making and Leadership in the 21st Century

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course examines the theories, modes of operation and challenges of modern day political leadership and executive decision-making. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing case studies, crisis situations, simulations and personal profiles to develop a comprehensive exploration of the leadership characteristics and decision-making strategies of political and governmental officials in the 21st century.

  
  • POLI 551 - Managing Economic and Community Development

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course introduces students to the many dimensions of economic development at the local and state level, focusing on aspects of how local governments are engaging themselves in this competitive arena. The course explores the following fundamental questions: Who is involved in local economic development? What policies and programs are being pursued and how are they being implemented? What is the impact of local economic development programs? How does local politics influence economic development actions? In addition, the course covers how the external environments (federal policy and national/regional economic cycles, for example) shape the scope and method of economic development at the local level.

  
  • POLI 561 - Foundations of Sustainability and Sustainable Development

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501, which may be taken concurrently; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    Sustainable development and sustainability are increasingly important to public administration theory and practice. This course will introduce students to theories of sustainability, provide practical application to policy issues within the field and will teach students to better use planning tools in resources management. Areas of focus include management of natural capital, understanding of systems theories and impacts, management of environmental and human welfare, and conservation history as applied to local global governance and policy-making. Students will be expected to contribute knowledge from their own knowledge base and experiences to enhance the learning environment as service-learning is a component of this course.

  
  • POLI 571 - Foundations of Civic and Nonprofit Theory and Administration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501, which may be taken concurrently; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course addresses the historical and philosophical roots of what is alternatively called the third, voluntary or nonprofit sector. It also addresses the structure of the sector and current and future trends that influence it. Its purpose is to provide an overview of the issues and trends within the sector in order to lay a strong foundation of knowledge for those who are pursuing a career in nonprofit organizations and/or work in fields that intersect with nonprofit organizations.

  
  • POLI 572 - Nonprofit Resource Development and Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to issues and techniques for resource development and management within nonprofit organizations. The course will expand students’ knowledge about the nonprofit sector as well as their fundraising, management and analytical tools. Assignments and discussions, as well as spending time in the community through service-learning projects, will allow students to test knowledge, formulate ideas and strategies, respond to issues and dilemmas and get immediate feedback from classmates and the instructor.

  
  • POLI 580 - Administrative Law in Public Administration

    (1 credit)
    This course offers participants an introduction to key legal issues in public administration practice and a background of the administrative law process. Participants will identify key legal issues for public and non-profit agency leadership. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 581 - Introduction to Certified Public Management

    (1 credit)
    This course in the CPM program introduces key concepts, themes and theories in public service delivery. This foundational course provides students with an overview of topics offered in our program, identifies key learning objectives and goals, and prepares students for service projects and other deliverables in the program. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 582 - Change Management

    (1 credit)
    This course focuses on innovation and growth in leadership positions. The course addresses communication of vision, collaboration with internal and external stakeholders, and preparation for opportunities, challenges and risks in leadership positions. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 583 - Conflict Resolution and Negotiation in Public Management

    (1 credit)
    This course focuses on conflict resolution, negotiation and mediation approaches and their application in a public or non-profit agency setting. It provides skill building on meeting management, facilitation of decision making, and citizen inclusion in organizations, building on the student’s knowledge, experience, and style preferences as a leader. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 584 - Managing Human Resources in Public and Nonprofit Leadership

    (1 credit)
    This course provides an overview of human resources theory and application. The focus is on legal, administrative and management best practices. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 585 - Legal Practices in Human Resources

    (1 credit)
    This course focuses on administrative law and legal issues as applied to human resources. Participants will learn about best practices for human resources management. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 587 - Leading Sustainable Organizations

    (1 credit)
    This course provides leaders with the tools to lead through effective and efficient integration of social, economic and social sustainability tenets. The course offers practical methods to improve organizations through systems and management approaches and offers solutions for leading for future changes in the work and community environments. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 588 - Thesis

    (3 or 6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate coordinator and the department chairperson; approved thesis proposal is required
    Original research undertaken by the MPA student in the field of public administration. Research undertaken is intended to culminate in a formal thesis. Department standards require the student to work closely with his/her adviser and to phase the work so that the project proposal is carefully designed and approved before the student advances to the next stage. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Thesis” in the “Graduate Academic Policies ” section of this catalog and the paragraph titled “Exit Requirement” under Master of Public Administration in the “Academic Programs ” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. This course is graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No pass basis.

  
  • POLI 589 - Understanding and Promoting Ethical Behavior

    (1 credit)
    This course exposes students to key ethical issues and concepts in public administration and provides guidance on how to build an organization with a strong ethical foundation through leadership. Students will have the opportunity to practice decision-making skills and to discuss critical issues in public service ethics today. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 590 - Leadership Self-Awareness

    (1 credit)
    This course is designed to help leaders develop self-assessment skills and to use these skills for continuous improvement. Participants will learn about leadership models, tools for assessment, and management tools. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 591 - Capstone Seminar in Public Administration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Completion of 30 hours of course work
    This course will integrate the various fields of knowledge that the student has acquired over the period of MPA study. Full-time MPA faculty will be responsible for teaching it and the design will not be prescribed; some may choose to teach it as an applied case-study seminar, while others may develop the course thematically, as an in-depth study of a particular area of public administration literature. Offered spring semester.

  
  • POLI 592 - Special Topics in Public Administration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Course prerequisite may be specified depending upon the nature of the topic
    Special topics of current relevance in public administration will be offered from time to time. The topic to be addressed will be announced prior to registration. May be taken more than once with the consent of the adviser.

  
  • POLI 593 - Planning and Development

    (1 credit)
    This course offers participants foundational information on planning and development approaches in public and nonprofit organizations. Students will understand the basic planning and development tools and their applications. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 595 - Strategies for Organizational Assessment

    (1 credit)
    This course offers basic tools for managing evaluation and assessment of organizations and organizational projects. Implications for accreditation and organizational growth will be discussed. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 596 - Capstone Experience

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: POLI 581 and POLI 584 and POLI 595 and POLI 597
    This is the required concluding course in the Certified Public Managers (CPM) program. It provides an opportunity for participants to conclude their experience with a final service learning project. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 597 - Budgeting Process in Public and Nonprofit Organizations

    (1 credit)
    This course introduces participants to key concepts in public and nonprofit budgeting processes and concepts. It allows participants to evaluate their own organizational budgeting processes and to design potential improvements. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 598 - Internship: Public Administration

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in MPA program; formal application required
    One of the key elements for pre-career students in the Bridgewater State University MPA program is the internship experience. An internship provides an opportunity to apply and test what has been learned in the classroom and allows the student to develop professional skills. The general internship framework is designed to conform to the NASPAA internship guidelines. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.


Portuguese

  
  • LAPO 101 - Elementary Portuguese I

    (3 credits)
    An introduction to elementary syntactic, semantic, phonetic and paralinguistic structures is offered. Pertinent everyday cultural concepts are discussed. Relevant comparison and contrast with the native language is treated. Functional communication in the second language in a controlled environment is the principal objective of the course. Note: See the “Departmental Foreign Language Policy” in the “Foreign Languages” section of this catalog. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
  • LAPO 102 - Elementary Portuguese II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LAPO 101; or see the “Departmental Foreign Language Policy” in the “Foreign Languages” section of this catalog
    The further study of elementary syntactic, semantic, phonetic and paralinguistic structures is offered. Pertinent everyday cultural concepts are discussed. Relevant comparison and contrast with the native language is treated. Functional communication in the second language in a controlled environment is the principal objective of the course. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
  • LAPO 151 - Intermediate Portuguese I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LAPO 102
    This course is a review of Portuguese grammar with emphasis given to reading, writing, listening and speaking; systematic laboratory practice; an introduction to Portuguese culture. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
  • LAPO 152 - Intermediate Portuguese II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LAPO 151
    The course continues to review and reinforce previously acquired skills in Portuguese, in a communicative and functional way. More culturally based materials are introduced, focusing on the Portuguese linguistic and cultural heritage. In this student-centered approach, students make presentations and hold discussions in Portuguese. Dialectal variation (e.g., European vs. Brazilian Portuguese) and the various traditions of Portuguese-speaking countries are addressed. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
  • LAPO 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
  • LAPO 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • LAPO 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)


Psychology

  
  • PSYC 100 - Introductory Psychology

    (3 credits)
    This is a survey of the different processes such as perception, sensation, learning and emotion, with a discussion of the underlying physiological processes as well as an introduction to the more complex areas such as personality development, psychopathology, social influences and testing. Methods of investigation and research will be integrated with the above topics. Offered either semester. (CSOC)

  
  • PSYC 135 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia allow honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes; specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for credit. Offered fall semester.

  
  • PSYC 136 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia allow honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes; specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for credit. Offered spring semester.

  
  • PSYC 150 - Orientation to the Psychology Major

    (1 credit)
    This course is an introduction to the department, its faculty and courses, with an emphasis on career planning and student development. The students will be introduced to the major fields in psychology with an emphasis on the importance of science and empiricism in understanding psychological phenomena. This course is recommended for anyone considering psychology as a major. All psychology majors must complete this course during their first year as a degree-seeking psychology major. This course is graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • PSYC 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
  • PSYC 200 - Non-Western Theories of Personality

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    This course examines the conceptual models of personality as they have appeared in non-Western traditions. Differences in focus, emphasis and views of the nature of the self are investigated as they relate to cultural world views such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
  • PSYC 201 - Statistics for Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and MATH 100 or higher (except First and Second Year Seminars and MATH 408); or consent of instructor
    Statistics for Psychology is primarily a course that will introduce students to the application of statistics to the research process in psychology. Statistics are used to describe and to critically evaluate information. The two branches of statistics, descriptive and inferential statistics, will be covered in this course. Specific procedures that may be covered include measures of central tendency and variability, visual description of data, z-scores, correlation and linear regression, basic probability, parametric tests such as z-tests, t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVAs), and non-parametric tests such as the chi-square test. (CQUR)

  
  • PSYC 215 - Service-Learning in Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Topics and partnerships with community agencies may vary from semester to semester. However, every semester students will have an opportunity to learn about some topic(s) in psychology, e.g., boys’ development, girls’ development, aging, mental illness, etc., and apply those concepts in work with a community partner. In regular class meetings students will read professional literature on the topic, reflect on that work in writing, discussions, media analyses and in other ways. In additional out-of-class experiences, students will engage in community service of some kind using what they have learned in class to inform the service work. Students will be active learners, and they will be encouraged to reflect on and evaluate the service work that they and their community partners do. The course may be repeated twice for a maximum of nine credits, though only the first three credits will count toward the psychology major.

  
  • PSYC 224 - Child Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    An investigation of the growth and development of the child from conception to pre-adolescence will include both the influence of heredity and other biological factors as well as the social influences of child-rearing practices, family value systems and peer culture effects. Topics will include the development of verbal ability, conscience and moral judgment, personality and self concept. Current theories and research findings will be discussed in relation to the above topics.

  
  • PSYC 226 - Adolescent Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    An investigation of the growth and development of the pre-adolescent and adolescent including both physical as well as psychological changes relating to intellectual, moral, emotional, personality and social aspects. Current theories and research findings will be discussed in relation to the above topics.

  
  • PSYC 227 - Developmental Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    This course offers a survey of the life cycle by means of an integrated approach to understanding developmental processes and the individual. The developmental tasks of infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood are viewed from a life-span perspective, with an emphasis on continuity and change.

  
  • PSYC 230 - Cross-Cultural Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    This course examines various psychological processes such as self-perception, communication, decision-making, categorization of others, gender perception, aggression, conformity, and helping, from a cross-cultural perspective. Emphasis will be placed on cultural differences in psychological functioning. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
  • PSYC 239 - Psychology of Aging

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    This course examines the sensory, cognitive and social changes resulting from old age, including changes in learning, personality and pathology. Problems of adjustment will be discussed and integrated with research findings in gerontology. (Formerly PSYC 329)

  
  • PSYC 242 - Biopsychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to biopsychology, the scientific study of the biology of behavior. A major component to this course involves a detailed analysis of the brain, including how neurons communicate with one another and the identification and functional significance of major brain structures. In this course, students will learn about a variety of systems including those involved in vision, attention, memory, language and movement. Additional topics include brain damage and neuroplasticity, drug addiction and the biopsychological examination of hunger and sleep. Emphasis will be on psychological correlates of neurophysiological processes. (Formerly PSYC 342)

  
  • PSYC 269 - Psychology of Criminal Behavior

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    This class covers basic psychological knowledge about the causes of crime and violent crime. Topics include biological causes of crime, family and childrearing causes, social causes, cognitive biases, and psychological and psychiatric issues and the role they play in criminal behavior. Case studies are examined, and basic research is reviewed. (Formerly PSYC 369)

  
  • PSYC 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia allow honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes; specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered fall semester.

  
  • PSYC 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia allow honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes; specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered spring semester.

  
  • PSYC 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • PSYC 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • PSYC 310 - Social Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    The individual in social situations: attitude formation and change, culture and society, language and communication, leadership and group dynamics, personality characteristics and interpersonal relationships, small group behavior.

  
  • PSYC 313 - Industrial and Organizational Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    The course will broadly cover the major themes represented by the study of industrial and organizational psychology. The first half of the semester will focus on areas such as job analysis, employee selection, training, performance appraisal and motivation. The second half of the semester will focus on employee behavior within an organizational framework.

  
  • PSYC 320 - Research Methods in Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100; and PSYC 201 with a minimum grade of “C”; or consent of instructor
    This course will focus on research methods in psychology. Students will learn how to conduct, comprehend and critically evaluate research methods used in a diversity of psychological research including, for example, biopsychology, child psychology, social issues, sensation and perception, and learning and motivation. Students will evaluate how real studies test theories and hypotheses and determine how to resolve the conflicting findings of previous research. Proper psychological experimental design and writing format will be emphasized. (CWRM)

  
  • PSYC 337 - Cognitive Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and at least nine hours in psychology; or consent of instructor
    The psychology of thinking, including historical and philosophical issues, process models, information theory, cybernetic, general systems and field theory approaches, visual and auditory cognition, psycholinguistics, memory and attention, problem solving and concept formation, with implications for mental retardation and learning disabilities.

  
  • PSYC 344 - Drugs and Human Behavior

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    An exploration of psychoactive drugs and the way in which they are used in psychology today. Each drug will be studied in terms of the psychological, psychophysiological and behavioral theories of drug effects.

  
  • PSYC 350 - Special Topics in Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and at least six hours in psychology; or consent of instructor
    Various and special topics of current interest in psychology will be offered from time to time. Topics will be announced prior to registration. May be taken more than once but only three credits will be counted towards the first 33 hours in the psychology major.

  
  • PSYC 352 - Psychology of Learning

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    The shaping of behavior, laboratory conditioning, reinforcement, approach and avoidance of a goal, discrimination and generalization of physical cues and animal learning experiments. Experimental approaches to the study of human behavior. (Formerly PSYC 252)

  
  • PSYC 355 - Behavior Analysis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    This course systematically presents the principles that are necessary to analyze everyday human behavior. These principles are then applied to the treatment and prevention of a wide variety of behavior problems in education, clinical settings and the workplace. An emphasis is placed on the research methods used to assess the effectiveness of each procedure used to change behavior.

  
  • PSYC 360 - Psychology of Personality

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    Basic concepts in the field of personality, organized around such topics as motivation, personality structure and dynamics, personality development, assessment and therapy. Problems and styles of adjustments will be considered.

  
  • PSYC 370 - Abnormal Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    The primary purpose of this course is to define and classify the many different types of abnormal behavior. The genetic, biochemical and environmental causes for each category of behavior are presented. To a lesser degree, the most effective treatments and the degree to which the treatments are successful are evaluated.

  
  • PSYC 390 - Research Problems in Psychology

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and consent of department chairperson; formal application required. Students cannot enroll in PSYC 390 and PSYC 497 at the same time with the same professor in any given semester.
    In this course, students will conduct an individual research project over one semester or multiple semesters in collaboration with a faculty mentor. At the end of each semester, the student must either give a professional presentation at a conference (on or off campus) or write an APA-style paper. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered fall and spring semesters.

  
  • PSYC 399 - Pre-Honors Psychology Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors Program; and a grade of “B” or higher in PSYC 201 and PSYC 320; or consent of instructor
    Students will attend a one-hour weekly meeting designed to prepare them for completing an honors thesis. Outcomes for the course include choosing a research topic, choosing a mentor and developing a research proposal.

  
  • PSYC 400 - Honors Psychology Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 399 or consent of instructor
    Students will attend a one-hour weekly meeting that they will enroll in concurrent with PSYC 485 Honor Thesis for a total of two credits over two semesters. This course is defined to support and monitor students with their thesis progress with the objective of completing an honors thesis. This course may be taken twice for up to two credits.

  
  • PSYC 410 - Applied Social Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and PSYC 310; or consent of instructor
    This course examines how theories, principles, methods and research findings from social psychology can be applied to the understanding and solution of everyday social problems. Applications to clinical and health psychology as well as issues related to the legal system, education and the environment are examined. (Formerly PSYC 210)

  
  • PSYC 421 - Psychology of Human Differences

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    The relative contributions of genes and environment to individual and group differences will be examined. Topics will include the description of human variability; gene/environment interactions; the heritability of cognitive abilities, personality, and psychopathology; and sex and age differences. (Formerly PSYC 321)

  
  • PSYC 426 - Comparative Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    This course will introduce students to the use of evolutionary theory as an organizing mechanism in understanding both human and nonhuman behavior. We will examine behavior in terms of Tinbergen’s four questions of nature: What is the cause of the behavior? How does the behavior develop? What is the function of the behavior? How did the behavior evolve? The course will also analyze the effects of natural selection, learning theory and cultural transmission in shaping the behavior of domestic and wild animal species. The course will culminate with a comprehensive research paper on an animal behavior topic of the student’s choice.

  
  • PSYC 427 - History of Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and at least nine hours in psychology; or consent of instructor
    This course will cover psychology’s philosophical, scientific and cultural foundations. It has been said that psychology has a brief history but a long past. As such, the course begins with ancient Greek psychological theories and progresses through Hellenism, Romanism, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the start of scientific psychology in the late 1800s, and the subsequent explosion of specialization that lead to modern psychological thinking. Eminent thinkers and intellectural trends will be addressed, as well as the rise of science and its impact on understanding behavior and the mind. (Formerly PSYC 319)

  
  • PSYC 440 - Sensation and Perception

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and PSYC 242; or consent of instructor
    This course explores the relationship between the nature of the environment and perceptual experience, including the sensory processes. Perceptual processes examined include spatial, pattern, and color perception, as well as our perception of time, depth and the perception of action and events. The relationship between perception, memory, cognition and behavior is investigated, with implications for our understanding of cultural differences, how we perceive personality and emotion and psychotherapeutic change. (Formerly PSYC 340)

  
  • PSYC 445 - Cognitive Neuroscience

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and PSYC 242 and PSYC 337; or consent of instructor
    This course focuses on the study of the neural processes underlying human cognition and perception. How does the brain’s neural organization and functional connectivity give rise to human cognitive and perceptual abilities, such as sensory perception, learning, attentional regulation, memory, language, music and emotions? This question is addressed in the context of cognitive neuroscience research, which makes use of varied methodologies, including single cell recordings, animal models, brain imaging techniques and patient studies. Offered annually. (Formerly PSYC 345)

  
  • PSYC 460 - Neuropsychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and PSYC 242; or consent of instructor
    This course is an introduction to neuropsychology focusing on the behavioral deficits that arise from brain pathology. This pathology includes diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s as well as other brain-related conditions such as stroke, tumors and head injury. Through this course students will learn about the history of neuropsychology, details of brain anatomy, various neuropsychological assessments, and the examination of behavioral deficits and neuropsychological profiles associated with a variety of brain disorders and/or conditions.

  
  • PSYC 465 - Health Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor
    This course will review the critical role of behavior in health promotion and disease prevention. Theories and interventions related to health and behavior will be examined. The content of this course crosses the behavioral sciences, social sciences and medical sciences. Students will learn to conceptualize health from biological, psychological and social perspectives. Those who will benefit from this course are students seeking to understand how behavior affects health and what behavioral change strategies can be used to improve health status. (Formerly PSYC 365)

  
  • PSYC 470 - Clinical Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and PSYC 360 and PSYC 370; or consent of instructor
    This course is a survey of diagnostic and treatment procedures and resources in clinical work with children and adults; professional skills and responsibilities of the clinical psychologist are covered.

  
  • PSYC 474 - Forensic Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and PSYC 360 and PSYC 370; or consent of instructor
    A study of basic underlying assumptions of personality theory such as intentionality, nature/nurture and the knowability of man as these issues pertain to motive and bias as they manifest themselves in a judicial system.

  
  • PSYC 485 - Honors Thesis I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students with consent of instructor; formal application required
    Two two-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. The honors student will normally enroll in this course during the fall semester of the senior year and complete the course during the spring semester of the senior year, earning a total of six credits. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Department Honors Committee.

  
  • PSYC 490 - Senior Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 15 hours in psychology; or consent of instructor
    Topical areas of psychology will be offered to allow seniors an opportunity to engage in an extended writing project and to make individual presentations and critique each other through writing and discussion. Topics will be announced in advance. (CWRM)

  
  • PSYC 493 - Internship: Peer Assisted Learning

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: A minimum overall GPA of 3.0; and a grade of “B” or better in courses which the student will serve as a peer educator; and consent of department; formal application required
    As part of the internship, qualified students will complete the Peer Tutor Training Program offered through the Academic Achievement Center, designed to assist students in the development of the knowledge and strategies essential for serving as a peer educator. Students will also be assigned to and attend a designated class in the Department of Psychology throughout the semester. Working under faculty supervision, students will schedule, prepare and conduct study sessions for students outside of class, consistent with recognized practices, and may assume other appropriate responsibilities. Students will work with only one class per semester. This course may be taken up to four times for a maximum of 12 credits, not more than two times in the same course.

  
  • PSYC 497 - Research

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and consent of the department; formal application required. Students cannot enroll in PSYC 497 and PSYC 390 at the same time with the same professor in any given semester.
    This course is for students interested in becoming involved in a faculty member’s research laboratory. Students will learn research skills and techniques under the supervision of a faculty mentor and will be involved in a research project. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

  
  • PSYC 498 - Internship in Psychology

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of department; formal application required
    This internship is open to juniors and seniors who wish to have the opportunity to gain first-hand experience in applying psychology in a clinical setting. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Graded on (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • PSYC 499 - Directed Study in Psychology

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 100; consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • PSYC 500 - Developmental Human Psychology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in graduate program in psychology or counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course provides a comprehensive foundation for the study of human psychology from a developmental perspective. The scope and current thinking in each of the five cognate areas will be examined, including cognition/perception, neuropsychology, psychopathology, learning and social psychology. Current research theory, application and conceptual structure within each area will be reviewed. Considerable attention will be placed on the interface between theory and practice.

  
  • PSYC 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • PSYC 504 - Research

    (1-4 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson; formal application required
    Original research undertaken by the graduate student in a specific field. Students initially enroll in PSYC 504 for four credits, and subsequently enroll for one credit each term thesis work continues. For details, consult the paragraph entitled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog.

  
  • PSYC 505 - Research Methods and Design I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to MA in psychology program or consent of the department
    This course includes two semesters of integrated statistical procedures and research design skills. Special emphasis will be placed on methodological issues that are likely to confront the graduate in applied settings. In addition to covering traditional statistical and design concepts, special applied research tools such as survey methodology, program evaluation “small-N”designs, non-parametric and multivariate models will be presented. The course will be very closely tied to the use of commonly available statistical packages such as SPSS, BMD, ALICE and STP. The course will reflect a strong experiential component including data collection, analysis and interpretation.

  
  • PSYC 506 - Research Methods and Design II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to MA in psychology program or consent of the department
    This course includes two semesters of integrated statistical procedures and research design skills. Special emphasis will be placed on methodological issues that are likely to confront the graduate in applied settings. In addition to covering traditional statistical and design concepts, special applied research tools such as survey methodology, program evaluation “small-N”designs, non-parametric and multivariate models will be presented. The course will be very closely tied to the use of commonly available statistical packages such as SPSS, BMD, ALICE and STP. The course will reflect a strong experiential component including data collection, analysis and interpretation.

  
  • PSYC 508 - Advanced Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to MA in psychology program or consent of the department
    Various and special topics of current relevance in psychology, to be dealt with in depth, will be offered from time to time. Topics will be announced before pre-registration. May be taken more than once.

  
  • PSYC 509 - Foundations of Clinical Practice

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in graduate program in psychology or counseling; or consent of instructor
    This course will prepare the clinician for practicum/internship training by considering the following: 1) historical overview of the profession; 2) multidimensional identity and roles of the mental health professional; 3) practice issues and issues related to federal and state legislation dealing with, for example, duty to warn, confidentiality and mandated reporting: 4) the variety of clinical settings and mental health delivery systems, including principles, theories and techniques of evaluation and management; 5) ethical and legal standards of psychological professional organizations: 6) experimental learning and the use of supervision; 7) report writing and note-keeping for clinicians; 8) self-evaluation.

  
  • PSYC 511 - Theories of Psychotherapy

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to MA in psychology program or consent of the department
    The major counseling theories are explored in an academic and experiential format. Role-playing and videotaping of the theories are common modalities. A sampling of the theories discussed are Reality Therapy, Behavior Therapy, Rational Emotive Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, Transactional Analysis, Client Centered Therapy and the Psychoanalytic Model. (Formerly PSYC 570)

  
  • PSYC 512 - Evaluation Techniques

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to MA in psychology program or consent of the department
    The course will begin with traditional components of psychological testing, including test construction, test development, test administration and test interpretation. Specific training will be placed on frequently administered clinical tests (e.g., MMPI, WAIS, and WISC). Beyond traditional test theory, students will be exposed to contemporary evaluation devices including behavioral assessment, interview data and naturalistic observation. (Formerly PSYC 573)

  
  • PSYC 513 - Psychopharmacology for Nonmedical Professionals

    (3 credits)
    This course examines modern drug treatment for mental disorders, including schizophrenia, mania, depression and anxiety. The types of drugs – antipsychotics, antidepressants, antianxiety and sedative-hypnotics – are discussed in conjunction with diagnostic factors, effectiveness, side effects, risk, and biological actions. Psychotherapeutic and ethical concerns are considered.

 

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