Feb 28, 2024  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Physics

  
  • PHYS 102 - Modern Physics for the Humanist

    (3 credits)
    The principal theme of this course is 20th-century attempts to understand the basic laws of nature and their relationship to us. Among the topics to be considered are classical physics, the theory of relativity, atomic structure and quantum theory along with their implications for philosophy and technology. Offered either semester. (CNSN; CQUR)

  
  • PHYS 107 - Exploring the Universe

    (4 credits)
    This course will explore the sun, stars, their life cycles, and the galaxies. Theories of the composition and origin of the solar system, the universe and life will be studied. Students observe celestial objects including the moon, sun, planets star, nebulae, and galaxies using the university’s observatory. Three hours of lecture, one two-hour laboratory and several viewing sessions weekly. Offered either semester. (CNSL; CQUR)

  
  • PHYS 108 - The Physics of Music

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: Mathematical Reasoning core curriculum requirement (CMAR)
    Music represents a unique discipline where “art” and “science” meet together and interact on equal footing. This course covers generation and transmission of sound, the ear’s response to sound, and sound generated from various musical instruments. There will also be an introduction to room acoustics, sound synthesis, sound analysis and basic fundamentals of musical construction. Lecture and lab will be combined, meeting for a total of six hours per week. Offered either semester. (CNSL; CQUR)

  
  • PHYS 135 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in physics allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered fall semester.

  
  • PHYS 136 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in physics allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered spring semester.

  
  • PHYS 180 - Energy and its Social Uses

    (3 credits)
    The basic physical laws of energy are presented. Environmental consequences of solar, fossil, hydro and nuclear energy generation are analyzed. Offered either semester. (CNSN; CQUR)

  
  • PHYS 181 - Elements of Physics I

    (4 credits)
    The language and methods of physics as illustrated in mechanics, heat and sound are studied. Applications of fundamental principles of physics to all branches of physical science are examined. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered fall semester. (CNSL; CQUR)

  
  • PHYS 182 - Elements of Physics II

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 181
    Principles of electricity, magnetism, optics and modern physics are studied. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered spring semester. (CNSL; CQUR)

  
  • PHYS 183 - Aviation Physics

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 181
    Principles of physics will be applied to topics in aviation science. This course will use the fundamental physics principles taught in Elements of Physics I (PHYS 181) and apply them to aviation science. The course will also apply topics introduced in a traditional second semester course such as heat, electronics and electricity to the field of aviation. Furthermore, the course will cover aerodynamics in depth. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory weekly. (CNSL; CQUR)

  
  • PHYS 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
  • PHYS 243 - General Physics I

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 151 or MATH 161/161E, which may be taken concurrently
    This is a calculus-based beginning course in physics that emphasizes the study of kinematics, dynamics and heat. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly; or six hours of combined lecture and lab taught in a studio style, weekly. Offered annually. (CNSL; CQUR)

  
  • PHYS 244 - General Physics II

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 243
    This course is a calculus-based study of electricity, magnetism and light. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly; or six hours of combined lecture and lab taught in a studio style, weekly. Offered annually. (CNSL; CQUR)

  
  • PHYS 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquium in physics allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered fall semester.

  
  • PHYS 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquium in physics allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project, which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered spring semester.

  
  • PHYS 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • PHYS 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • PHYS 382 - Physics Research Seminar

    (1 credit)
    The purpose of this seminar is to expose undergraduate students to current physics research - including that being done by Bridgewater State University faculty - and to develop their repertoire of research skills (e.g. literature searches, reading and discussing scholarly/peer reviewed journal articles, grant writing and peer review). Invited speakers will include Bridgewater State University faculty, local physics researchers and graduate students. May be taken two times for credit. The course is graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered fall semester.

  
  • PHYS 383 - Physics Teaching Seminar

    (1 credit)
    The purpose of this seminar is to expose undergraduate students to a variety of current issues related to physics education. They will be introduced to different pedagogical techniques specific to physics by studying published research as well as by hearing presentations by invited speakers. May be repeated for a maximum of three credits for different topics. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • PHYS 396 - Research Problems in Physics

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen; formal application required
    The student will conduct an individual research experience over one semester or multiple semesters in collaboration with a faculty member. At the end of each semester, a written progress report must be submitted for review by the supervising faculty member and a presentation is made to the physics faculty and students. This course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits.

  
  • PHYS 401 - Modern Physics

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 244 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course covers theory of relativity, atomic structure, quantum theory, nuclear physics and elementary particles. Students perform modern physics experiments, emphasizing modern instrumentation and professional lab report writing in conjunction with theory presented in lecture. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered fall semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
  • PHYS 402 - Quantum Mechanics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 401 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    Quantum Mechanics develops a wave function formulism of matter, the Schrodinger equation, and its underlying mathematical structure. The Schrodinger equation is applied to the electron, the hydrogen atom, multi-electron atoms and radiation. Offered either semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
  • PHYS 403 - Mathematical Physics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: MATH 162; and PHYS 244 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    Vector analysis; matrices, linear differential equations; Sturm-Liouville theory; Fourier series; orthogonal functions; Laplace transform. Offered fall semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
  • PHYS 408 - Astrophysics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 401 or consent of instructor
    Stellar atmospheres and interiors; generation and transport of energy; stellar evolution, pulsars, blackholes and quasars; galactic structure; cosmology.

  
  • PHYS 414 - Experimental Physics

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 401
    This class introduces students to advanced experimental techniques of physics. Students will perform historically ground-breaking experiments using modern equipment. There will be one lecture and two two-hour laboratory sessions per week. Offered spring semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
  • PHYS 422 - Computer Simulation in Physical Science

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 243 and PHYS 244 or PHYS 181 and PHYS 182; or consent of instructor
    The course introduces methods of computer simulation and its diverse applications. The course is project-oriented. Projects may include planetary motion, chaotic systems, fractal phenomena, random systems, and thermal systems. Methods include the numerical solution of differential equations and Monte Carlo techniques. The course emphasizes structured programming and is recommended for science majors as an introduction to programming. No background in computer programming is required. Two hours of lecture, and one two-hour laboratory period weekly.

  
  • PHYS 433 - Thermal Physics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 401 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    Thermodynamics, kinetic theory and statistical mechanics are covered in this course. Offered spring semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit. (CWRM)

  
  • PHYS 435 - Optics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 244
    Study of geometrical and physical optics. Offered alternate years, fall semester only. May be taken for graduate credit.

  
  • PHYS 438 - Electricity and Magnetism

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 244 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course covers the theory and applications of the fundamental equations of electromagnetism. Offered either semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
  • PHYS 439 - Mechanics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 244 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    Vector treatment of forces, torques: dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; work and energy; momentum; small oscillation theory; Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation of dynamics are covered in this course. Offered either semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
  • PHYS 442 - Digital Electronics I

    (4 credits)
    Prerequisite: College-level course in physics or consent of instructor
    Digital Electronics emphasizes the theory and experimentation of digital (and some analog) electronics for the Computer Science major and/or working scientist in the lab. Boolean algebra of switching circuits, binary logic circuits, digital computer logic circuits, as well as analog to digital, digital to analog, and programmable electronics (FPLAs and microprocessors) for data acquisition and control are covered. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. Offered either semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit.

  
  • PHYS 458 - Advanced Electricity and Magnetism

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 438 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course is a continuation of PHYS 438. Maxwell’s equations and their connection to special relativity are explored. The propagation of electromagnetic radiation predicted by Maxwell, the transfer of energy determined by Poynting’s theorem, and the relativistic generalization of the Larmor formula for the radiation by accelerated charges will be studied. This course prepares students for graduate work. Offered either semester.

  
  • PHYS 459 - Advanced Mechanics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 439 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    A more in-depth study of mechanics than PHYS 439 is offered. This course prepares the student for graduate work. Offered either semester.

  
  • PHYS 460 - Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: PHYS 402 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    The frameworks of both the wave function and matrix formalisms of quantum mechanics are developed, adding depth to and extending topics from PHYS 402, including time dependent and time independent perturbative techniques and applications. This course prepares students for graduate work. Offered either semester.

  
  • PHYS 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students; formal application required
    One-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered fall or spring semester.

  
  • PHYS 498 - Internship in Physics

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    The internship offers students an opportunity to gain laboratory experience in industrial or government laboratories, or academic laboratories at other institutions. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Offered either semester.

  
  • PHYS 499 - Directed Study in Physics

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
  • PHYS 502 - Research

    (3 or 6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Original research undertaken by the graduate student in their field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • PHYS 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • PHYS 560 - Special Topics in Physics Teaching

    (variable credit)
    Special topics of current relevance in physics education. The topic to be addressed will be announced prior to registration. May be taken more than once with the consent of the advisor.

  
  • PHYS 591 - Special Topics in Modern Physics


  
  • PHYS 593 - Special Topics in Secondary School Science

    (3 credits)
    An introduction to the environmental and energy-related physical science topics presented in the secondary school science curricula. Special emphasis will be placed upon the science content found in these curricula materials. Lectures, seminars, laboratory work, workshops and model classes will be included in this course. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
  • PHYS 594 - Special Topics in Middle School Science

    (3 credits)
    This course is an introduction to middle school science programs. Special emphasis will be placed upon the science content found in these curricula materials. Lectures, seminars, laboratory work and model classes will be included in this course. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
  • PHYS 597 - Special Topics in Elementary Science

    (3 credits)
    An introduction to elementary school science materials. Special emphasis will be placed upon the study of the science content included in these materials. Lectures, laboratory work, seminars, workshops, and model classes will be included in this course. This course may be repeated for different topics.


Political Science

  
  • POLI 135 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in political science allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project which provides the major part of the grade. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Offered fall semester.

  
  • POLI 136 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia in political science allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project which provides the major part of the grade. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum enrollment is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered spring semester.

  
  • POLI 172 - Introduction to American Government

    (3 credits)
    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the range of research on American political institutions and processes. Students will examine the constitutional underpinnings of American government, the role of political parties, interest groups and the media in the system. Students will also explore the changing character of political institutions: the presidency, Congress and the courts. (CSOC; CUSC)

  
  • POLI 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
  • POLI 250 - Research Methods in Political Science

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: One core curriculum requirement in Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning
    This course provides students with a foundation for reading and assessing the quality of published research in the social sciences, with particular emphasis on the research techniques common in political science and public administration. It introduces the concepts of theory development, hypothesis testing and statistical significance, and provides students with the rudimentary skills, from literature review searches through data analysis necessary to conduct their own research. Writing is emphasized. (Formerly POLI 350) (CSOC; CQUR)

  
  • POLI 260 - International Relations

    (3 credits)
    This course introduces modern world politics, with emphasis on change and continuity in the structure and processes governing relations within the international community. Emphasis will be placed on the nation-state dilemmas facing the global community. Offered either semester. (CSOC)

  
  • POLI 274 - Western Political Thought - Plato to the Present

    (3 credits)
    This course covers the principal ideas and philosophies of politics articulated by philosophers and political thinkers since ancient times. The student will be introduced to many of the age-old and puzzling questions of how people can best govern themselves using legal, institutional and behavioral approaches. Offered fall semester. (CSOC; CWRT)

  
  • POLI 275 - Comparative Government

    (3 credits)
    This course covers political behavior and government systems in Great Britain, France, Russia, etc. Offered fall semester. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
  • POLI 279 - Introduction to Public Administration

    (3 credits)
    The relationship of the administrative branch of government to other branches in the making and implementation of public policy; theories of government organization for efficient administration; problems of budgeting, personnel, merit systems, type of agency organization, popular control over the bureaucracy. Offered either semester. (CSOC; CUSC)

  
  • POLI 285 - Law and the Judicial Process

    (3 credits)
    This course provides an introduction to law and the judicial process in the United States and around the world. It examines different types of legal systems and sources of law; various competing theories of jurisprudence and legal methodology; the organization, operation, and powers of courts; the selection and retention of judges; and the role of the legal profession in society. Particular emphasis will be placed on legal reasoning and the judicial decision-making process in a variety of issue areas, including administrative, environmental, constitutional, criminal, civil, and statutory law cases. (CSOC; CUSC; CWRT)

  
  • POLI 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in political science allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project which provides the major part of the grade. Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum enrollment is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered fall semester.

  
  • POLI 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia in political science allow exceptionally able students to explore a challenging topic in small classes under close faculty supervision. Colloquia meet once a week for 50 minutes and culminate in a paper or scientific project which provides the major part of the grade. Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others at the discretion of the instructor. The minimum enrollment is two and the maximum enrollment is 12. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered spring semester.

  
  • POLI 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • POLI 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • POLI 301 - Model Senate Practicum

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172 and consent of instructor
    Students will role-play as United States senators. Each student will become familiar with the issue positions of his or her assigned senator, the senator’s voting behavior, and the characteristics of the senator’s state and constituents. Students will develop an understanding of the United States senate’s power and the rules and procedures that govern its day-to-day operations. All students will participate in both the Floyd M. Riddick Model Senate at Stetson University and the High School Model Senate at Bridgewater State University. One credit per semester; may be taken up to four times.

  
  • POLI 302 - Moot Court and Mock Trial Practicum

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172 and consent of instructor
    This course involves students adopting the roles of both lawyers and witnesses in “mock” civil and criminal cases, and/or participating as lawyers arguing cases before appellate courts in “moot” court competitions. Students will be expected to participate at local, regional, and national competitions, and in doing so will acquire first-hand knowledge of what it is like to be both an attorney arguing a case before a judge, and a witness on the stand providing testimony. In addition, students will gain valuable experience in preparing opening statements and closing arguments, writing briefs, cross-examining witnesses, and providing authentic, credible testimony. One credit per semester; may be taken up to four times.

  
  • POLI 304 - Citizenship and Community Leadership

    (3 credits)
    This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What do we mean by “citizenship” and why do we care about “good” citizenship?; 2) What is the nature of leadership and how do we develop strong, effective leaders?; and 3) How might we effectively engage citizens and public leaders together in democratic governance to produce solutions to social, economic, and political problems? A service-learning course requirement will guide the student toward discovery of the role of citizenship in strengthening and improving communities. Students will also be expected to attend campus events that are related to civic education, community leadership and political affairs. (Formerly POLI 201)

  
  • POLI 305 - American Government: State and Local

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172
    This course focuses on state government and politics with emphasis on Massachusetts affairs. Offered either semester. (Formerly POLI 277) (CSOC; CUSC)

  
  • POLI 329 - Leadership in Human Resources

    (3 credits)
    This course focuses on selected topics in the study and practice of public personnel administration. It is designed as an overview of the central topics in the field, including recruitment and selection, employee compensation and motivation, personnel appraisal, workforce training and development, and labor-management relations. Current issues and new directions in public and nonprofit sector personnel management will also be explored and discussed. Students will develop an appreciation for the dynamic political environment as it influences human resources managers and the statutory and constitutional restrictions that distinguish public personnel management from its counterpart in the private sector.

  
  • POLI 341 - Constitutional Law and Politics: The Powers of Government

    (3 credits)
    This course offers a close analysis of the structure and power of those institutions comprising the U.S. national government. Legal decisions pertaining to judicial, congressional, and executive power, as well as the doctrines of separation-of-powers and federalism, will be carefully examined. The course concludes with an examination of the Constitution’s protection of economic liberty and property rights.

  
  • POLI 342 - Constitutional Law and Politics: The First Amendment

    (3 credits)
    This course examines major court decisions involving disputes pertaining to the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. In particular, cases regarding freedom of speech, the press, religion, and the right to associate will be extensively studied. The course also considers the broad limits placed on the government by the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause.

  
  • POLI 343 - Constitutional Law and Politics: Liberty and Equality

    (3 credits)
    This course addresses the scope of the individual’s rights to liberty and equality under the fifth, ninth, and 14th Amendments of the U.S. Constitution. It examines the evolution of legal doctrine regarding the unequal treatment of individuals by public and private actors, including discrimination based on race, ethnicity, religion, sex, sexual orientation, class, age, and (dis)abilities. The course also analyzes the scope of liberty and privacy in the United States, with particular attention devoted to procedural and substantive due process, sexual freedom, procreation and child-rearing, the right to die, and personal information and workplace privacy.

  
  • POLI 344 - Constitutional Law and Politics: Rights of the Accused

    (3 credits)
    This course addresses how the U.S. Constitution – particularly the fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth and 14th Amendments – along with state and federal statutes, protect individuals being processed by the criminal justice system. Issues and case law pertaining to searches and seizures, compelled self-incrimination, grand jury indictment, trial by jury, speedy and public trials, double jeopardy, the right to counsel, cruel and unusual punishment, and due process will be rigorously examined.

  
  • POLI 359 - International Law

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 260 and POLI 275; or consent of instructor
    This course will explore the nature of international law, its theoretical underpinnings and the actors it involves. In doing so, it will incorporate theoretical debates concerning the extent to which international law truly is “law,” and the challenges state sovereignty raise for compliance and enforcement. To put the mechanics of international law into context, the course will also examine specific applications, such as international human rights and environmental law, international criminal issues and the laws of war. Offered alternate spring semesters.

  
  • POLI 364 - Political Communication

    (3 credits) Cross Listed with COMM 364
    Prerequisite: Restricted to juniors or above; or consent of instructor
    This course surveys political communication with an emphasis on forms, characteristics, and functions within political campaigns and institutional governance. Specific attention will be given to communication of the three branches of government. Students will gain a broad knowledge of how political communication can shape expectations and interpretations of current events, political actors, and the political process.

  
  • POLI 366 - Terrorism and U.S. National Security

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 260 or consent of instructor
    The primary objective of the course is to explore the phenomenon of terrorism and how the United States attempts to address it as a central element of national security policy. Students will explore a wide variety of themes related to national security. Terrorism, particularly its international dimensions, will be placed in the context of national security and global politics.

  
  • POLI 368 - American Political Thought

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172 or consent of instructor
    This course examines the principal issues and ideas of the American colonial, revolutionary, and founding periods and their influence on, and relevance to, contemporary American politics.

  
  • POLI 372 - Legislative Process and Procedure

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172
    This course is an examination of the United States Congress. Emphasis is placed on internal structure and operations, congressional rules and procedures, party leadership, committee system and seniority, external influences on Congress, incentives for congressional behavior, and constitutional limitations.

  
  • POLI 375 - American Political Parties and Interest Groups

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172
    This course is an examination of American political party organizations, political leadership, finance, campaign techniques, the historical development of the American party system, party identification, legal controls over parties, the functions and methods of pressure groups and their interaction with policy makers, the role of surrogate organizations such as the media and political consultants, the significance of political parties and pressure groups for democratic ideology, and the problems of political leadership in a democracy.

  
  • POLI 376 - Urban Politics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172 and POLI 277
    This course emphasizes both the formal and informal political institutions and processes in American cities and suburbs, including governmental structures, political parties, interest groups, and service delivery systems. Special attention is given to the multiethnic and multicultural context within which urban politics in the United States takes place.

  
  • POLI 377 - Canadian-American Political Relations

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 260 or consent of instructor
    The course will specifically examine the Canadian-American political relationship through the review of prominent bilateral security, economic, environmental and jurisdictional issues. Principal emphasis will be placed on analyzing bargaining between Ottawa and Washington over a wide range of select case studies.

  
  • POLI 379 - Voters, Elections and Campaigns

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172
    This course is an examination of how citizens make electoral decisions, including the decision to participate in elections. The course compares models of voter behavior and probes the influence of such factors as party identification, opinions on issues, ideological orientations, and candidate evaluations; the social and economic context of voting is also examined, as is the importance of elections for policy-making and the functioning of the political system. In addition, the politics of candidate nominations is explored – mass media coverage and opinion polling; the citizen’s involvement in campaign politics; voter attitudes toward parties, candidates, and issues; and the interpretation of electoral outcomes.

  
  • POLI 380 - Public Opinion and Mass Political Behavior

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172
    This course is an examination of the nature of contemporary public opinion in the United States, the way in which political attitudes and beliefs find expression in electoral behavior and the conditions under which public sentiment is translated into public policy and government action. The goal is to understand political conflict and debate in the U.S. and the ways in which the public influences that debate. Major topics in public opinion include political tolerance and trust, attitudes toward women and minorities, the role of mass media and the impact of political values and ideology on political campaigns and elections.

  
  • POLI 384 - United States Foreign Policy

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 260 or consent of instructor
    This course is the study of the national interests and policy instruments that have formed and guided the foreign relations of the United States in the post 1945 period. Offered alternate years, spring semester.

  
  • POLI 385 - Government and Politics in the Middle East

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172 and POLI 275; or consent of instructor
    This course provides an introduction to the structures and processes of Middle Eastern government and politics, focusing on the evolution of contemporary Middle East since the end of World War I and on economic growth, social change, and political development in the region and in specific countries. Offered alternate years, spring semester.

  
  • POLI 388 - The Government and Politics of Eastern Europe

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 275
    This course will introduce students to the governmental structures and political processes of Eastern European countries, including Russia. Included in the course will be a study of national goals, policies and relations with other countries, and the ideological framework that make up these societies.

  
  • POLI 389 - Racial Politics in the United States

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172
    This course explores racial politics in the United States. It examines classic and contemporary scholarship on the following topics: social movements, collective action, voting and turnout, key provisions of the Voting Rights Act, social science perspectives on the Voting Rights Act, the concept of voting rights and democratic theory, the relationships between race, representation and political institutions, party politics and racial reorientation, the magnitude and structure of intolerance and its implications for democracy, and the causes and consequence of political socialization.

  
  • POLI 390 - Public Finance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 279 or consent of instructor
    The role of government in a market economy; the role of taxation in a market economy; principles of taxation; problems of budgeting, government expenditure and debt; and economic growth. Offered spring semester.

  
  • POLI 391 - The American Presidency

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172
    The purpose of the course is to explore the institution of the American presidency. It examines the constitutional prerogatives and organizational structure of the presidency, how presidential power developed historically, presidential selection and the nomination process, and decision-making. In addition, the course explores the relationship between the presidency and other institutions, both political and nonpolitical: the Congress, the bureaucracy, the courts and the media.

  
  • POLI 392 - Democratic Theory and Democratization

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 275 or consent of instructor
    The course considers the contemporary challenges to democracy in terms of the great issues posed by both democratic theorists and philosophers. These views will be analyzed in terms of the authoritarian, military, religious, ethnic and economic problems faced by countries undergoing democratization.

  
  • POLI 400 - Special Topics in Political Science

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Nine credits in political science or consent of instructor
    A topic of special interest to faculty and/or students will be explored. May be taken for credit more than once.

  
  • POLI 455 - Authoritarian Political Systems

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 275 or consent of instructor
    This is a course in authoritarianism as a form of political organization. The goal is to review, explain and understand the following: 1) the political, social, ideological and economic forces that give rise to this extremist form of polity; 2) the various mechanisms through which authoritarian rule manifests itself and is exercised; and 3) the role and influence of key political decision makers in authoritarian states. Offered spring semester.

  
  • POLI 473 - Globalization and Global Governance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 260 or consent of instructor
    This course provides a thorough understanding of the nature of globalization, the new and varied forms of social, economic and political interactions it has produced in the world, and the challenge of governing the resulting complex interdependence among subnational, national, regional, international and non-governmental actors.

  
  • POLI 475 - Senior Seminar in Political Science

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission is subject to the consent of the department chairperson and instructor. Students must register prior to the end of the preregistration period
    The undertaking of independent study and a research project presented in oral and written form. Offered either semester. (CWRM)

  
  • POLI 476 - Women and Politics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172 or consent of instructor
    Analysis of the role of women in current American politics. The focus is on changing trends in women’s electoral participation, political interest and office seeking over the last several decades, and recent gender differences in political involvement, candidate support, support for women’s issues and support for other public policies.

  
  • POLI 479 - Public Policy

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 172 and POLI 277
    A systematic study of theory and practice in the making and the execution of public policy including the factors of public demand on the political system; decision-making in the public sector; tools and techniques for implementation and evaluation; and the import for future planning.

  
  • POLI 485 - Honors Thesis in Political Science

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students and consent of the department
    One-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with Honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
  • POLI 488 - Politics and Development in the Third World

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 260 and POLI 275; or consent of instructor
    A survey of the political dynamics of development in the Third World with special emphasis on the dominant theories of development, current critical issues in the Third World, internal and external forces affecting Third World countries, and the policy directions taken by developing nations. Offered alternate years.

  
  • POLI 490 - Political Science Studies in Oxford

    (3 credits)
    Study of selected topics in political science including comparative politics. European government and law and legal systems. Open to juniors and seniors only. (This is a special program in England at Oxford University during July. Additional fees are required.)

  
  • POLI 495 - Administrative Law and Regulation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 279 or consent of instructor
    The legal and regulatory systems of federal, state and local governments will be analyzed as to their relationship to policy implementation and administration. Emphasis will be placed on charters, ordinances, legislative power, and administrative control in areas such as finance, personnel, labor, land use, licensing and education. Offered alternate years. (Formerly POLI 395)

  
  • POLI 498 - Internship in Political Science

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson; formal application required
    A non-classroom experience intended to complement the academic preparation of a limited number of juniors and seniors majoring in political science. Placements are in areas such as federal, state, city and town governments and private-interest groups. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Offered either semester.

  
  • POLI 499 - Directed Study in Political Science

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Offered either semester.

  
  • POLI 501 - Foundations of Public Administration

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the institutional, political, and normative context of public administration. The course will introduce students to the central issues, values and dilemmas facing the contemporary public service professional. By the end of the course, the successful student should have a better appreciation and understanding of the political nature and dynamics of public service in a democratic society. It is to be taken among the first four courses in the program. Introductory/background information in American government or public administration is beneficial to students enrolling in this course. Offered either semester.

  
  • POLI 502 - Research

    (3 or 6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson; formal application required
    Original research undertaken by the graduate student in their field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • POLI 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • POLI 504 - Quantitative Skills for Public Administrators

    (1 credit)
    This course provides students with a review of and practice with the basic quantitative skills they will need in order to succeed in quantitative tools-focused courses in public administration, including POLI 510 - Introduction to Research in Public Administration  and in POLI 521 - Public Finance  . All of the skill development will be tied specifically to public administration narratives and examples. The instructor will provide tools for individuals with fears tied to quantitative skill building and will assist individuals with overcoming these barriers through the use of tools, examples and exercises. Students leaving this course should be able to tackle basic quantitative skills in public administration education and practice. This course is graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis.

  
  • POLI 505 - Public Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: POLI 501; or consent of instructor and MPA program coordinator
    This course gives students broad exposure to the job of the public manager including an introduction to the specific management areas. The course emphasizes both traditional and cutting-edge principles of management. The topics include planning for public agencies, organizational structure and development, staffing, training, and motivating employees, leadership development, financing and budgeting for public programs, designing and implementing programs, management decision-making, evaluating and monitoring programs and ethical considerations for public managers.

 

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