Apr 19, 2024  
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions


Note: See Catalog Addenda  as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here  for information on how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Spanish

  
  • LASP 310 - Contemporary Latin American Short Story

    (3 credits)
    This course focuses primarily on stories written during the 20th century. The class will study representative texts and analyze their ideological concerns and innovative literary strategies. The class is conducted in Spanish and combines the use of lecture and discussion groups.

  
  • LASP 320 - Latin American Poetry


  
  • LASP 324 - Spanish Applied Linguistics

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 370 or consent of instructor
    This is a survey course that will cover theories and topics in first, second and foreign language learning in formal and informal settings. Emphasis will be on second language acquisition (SLA), psycholinguistics and language processing, pedagogy and research methods. No previous knowledge of linguistics is assumed. This course is conducted entirely in Spanish.

  
  • LASP 333 - Peer Tutoring in Spanish

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and approved application
    In this course students will complete the Peer Tutoring program offered through the Academic Achievement Center. They will be assigned to attend a designated class in the Department of Foreign Languages throughout the semester. Working under faculty supervision, students will schedule, prepare and conduct study sessions for students outside of class, consistent with recognized practices, and may assume other responsibilities.

  
  • LASP 350 - Gender, Sexuality and Politics in Hispanic Cinema

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 300 and LASP 370; or consent of instructor
    This course will explore Hispanic cinema from such directors as the surrealists Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dali to the contemporary work of Pedro Almodóvar, Fina Torres and Tomás Gutiérrez Alea. The study of cinematic techniques will be contextualized with reference to Hollywood, independent and European cinema. Close analysis will shed light on such issues as 1) links between the sexual body and the body politic; 2) constructions of “woman” as monster; 3) post-Francoist countercultural critiques of family and society; 4) cinematic violence as riposte to fascist ideologies; 5) cultural spectacles such as the bullfight, religious procession, and saintly relic; 6) surrealism, magical realism, and gender. Spanish majors and minors will read supplementary material in Spanish; final essays may be written in either language. This course fulfills credit toward the Spanish major and minor and the Women’s and Gender Studies minor. Offered every other year.

  
  • LASP 351 - Cervantes

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 401
    A study of the man and his works, with special emphasis on Don Quixote. Conducted in Spanish.

  
  • LASP 370 - Advanced Spanish Grammar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 200 or consent of instructor
    This course provides an in-depth overview of Spanish grammar, including advanced syntax, morphology and lexicon. This course is conducted in Spanish, and it is a requirement for Spanish majors planning on studying abroad. (Formerly LASP 271)

  
  • LASP 390 - Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 370
    This course provides a comprehensive description of the sound system of Spanish. Special attention is given to the identification of pronunciation problems of non-native speakers, with an emphasis on English pronunciation patterns. Students will be required to study the phonetics terminology and to relate the readings to sample recordings of native speakers. This course is conducted in Spanish. (Formerly LASP 290)

  
  • LASP 391 - Spanish Civilization

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 281 or consent of instructor
    Readings and discussion of topics related to Spanish civilization through the centuries are treated. Conducted in Spanish.

  
  • LASP 392 - Spanish-American Civilization

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 281 or consent of instructor
    Readings and discussions of topics related to South American and Caribbean civilizations from pre-Columbian to modern times are treated. Conducted in Spanish.

  
  • LASP 400 - Survey of Spanish Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 391 or consent of instructor
    The course introduces the student to the principal literary movements from the Middle Ages to the present. Representative authors such as Ruiz, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Moratin, Espronceda, Perez Galdos, Unamuno, Baroja, Garcia Lorca and Cela are treated. Conducted in Spanish.

  
  • LASP 401 - Topics in Spanish Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 400 or LASP 402 or consent of instructor
    Topics will focus on a particular genre, such as the short story or the theater, with intensive study of selected works from modern writers. Conducted in Spanish. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
  • LASP 402 - Survey of Spanish-American Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 392 or consent of instructor
    Principal literary movements from the colonial times to the present will be introduced. Discussion will include representative works of El Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Darío, Rulfo, Garcia Márquez and Fuentes. Conducted in Spanish.

  
  • LASP 403 - Topics in Spanish-American Literature

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASP 400 or LASP 402 or consent of instructor
    Topics will focus on a particular author, theme or genre, such as the short story or the theater, with intensive study of selected works from modern writers. Conducted in Spanish. This course may be repeated for different topics.


Special Education

  
  • SPED 135 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others by consent of the instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia allow honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes. Specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Offered fall semester.

  
  • SPED 136 - Freshman Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others by consent of the instructor
    Freshman Honors Colloquia allow honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes. Specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Offered spring semester.

  
  • SPED 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
  • SPED 202 - Introduction to Special Education

    (3 credits)
    This introductory course focuses on various aspects of education involving all learners, including educational philosophy, foundations, effective teaching practices and instructional models and professional teaching standards. Special education terminology used in describing and relating to learners with exceptional learning needs, identification of the components of special education law, and the analysis of the characteristics of students with exceptionalities, e.g., educational, psychological, medical and social, for the major disability categories, along the continuum of adaptations and accommodations will be emphasized. A 40-hour field experience is required.

  
  • SPED 203 - Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society

    (3 credits)
    This course will introduce the major goals, principles, and concepts of multicultural education with an emphasis on its impact on children, school and society. It will explore the cultural, linguistic and socioeconomic factors influencing our schools. It will offer concepts to assist participants to improve the learning environment and interaction among school, parents and community. Offered either semester. (CMCL)

  
  • SPED 204 - Children with Reading Disability: Diagnosis and Teaching Strategies

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 or SPED 211
    This course examines reading disability in the context of typical reading development and reviews appropriate classroom interventions. Specifically, this course addresses the acquisition and development of literacy; cognitive, physical, cultural and environmental contributions to reading disability; various models for intervention and specific instructional strategies for building skill and fluency in reading across grades and disciplines. A field-based prepracticum experience is required. (Formerly SPED 402)

  
  • SPED 211 - The Early Childhood Learner with Special Needs

    (3 credits)
    This course will enable the student to develop the instructional and behavioral competencies to foster the inclusion of young children with special needs into early childhood educational settings. This course will examine the curricular adaptations and modifications as well as the preparation, implementation and evaluation of Individualized Family Service Plans and Individualized Educational Plans. A 40-hour field experience is required.

  
  • SPED 217 - Meeting the Needs of All Learners

    (3 credits)
    This course will enable the student to identify appropriate strategies to effectively educate all learners, including students with special needs in general education settings. It will highlight instructional activities, curriculum modifications, assessment strategies and other adaptations that are usable in standards-based classroom. A 40-hour field experience is required.

  
  • SPED 229 - Field Work in Special Education

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 or SPED 203
    The practical aspects of special education will be brought into focus through the use of appropriate facilities. In cooperation with area programs, specific teaching and related activities will be undertaken for use in both special needs and mainstream programs.

  
  • SPED 286 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others by consent of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia allow honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes. Specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Offered fall semester.

  
  • SPED 287 - Sophomore Honors Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors students and to others by consent of the instructor
    Sophomore Honors Colloquia allow honors students to explore challenging topics in discussion-based small classes. Specific topics vary by semester and instructor. This course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Offered spring semester.

  
  • SPED 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • SPED 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • SPED 302 - Principles and Application of Behavioral Management for the Special Needs Learner

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program
    This course will focus on basic principles, models and techniques for effective individual and classroom management in various educational environments. A field-based prepracticum experience is required at the level of license sought: PreK-8, 5-12.

  
  • SPED 303 - Principles and Procedures of Assessment of Special Needs Learners

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program
    This course will provide students with the ability to assess educational needs of special learners. Emphasis on consideration of non-discriminatory procedures appropriate to social, racial and linguistic differences. Strategies for modifying teaching based on evaluation results. A field-based, prepracticum experience is required at the level of license sought: PreK-8, 5-12.

  
  • SPED 401 - Professional Practices for Beginning Special Educators

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 and admission to the Professional Education Program
    This course will develop the professional skills of beginning educators. It will address the areas of Individualized Education Program (IEP) development, writing 504 plans, progress monitoring, existing state and federal laws, working in inclusion settings with general educators, supervising paraprofessionals and working with parents and community agencies. This course will examine validated professional practices in special education. (CWRM)

  
  • SPED 403 - Curriculum Development and Implementation for Special Needs Learners

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program
    This course enables the student to design and implement appropriate Individual Educational Programs (IEPs) under existing federal and state laws. Emphasis is placed on strategies and techniques which promote the academic, social, emotional, vocational and cultural needs of the special needs learner within a variety of instructional environments. A field-based pre-practicum experience is required at the level of license sought: PreK-8, 5-12.

  
  • SPED 404 - Student Teaching Practicum: Inclusion Program (PreK-8)

    (6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and student teaching experience
    This practicum involves responsibility as a teacher in a general education classroom which includes specific services being provided for learners with special needs. This practicum is done at the PreK-8 level under a qualified cooperating teacher and a college supervisor.

  
  • SPED 405 - Student Teaching Practicum: Special Education Program (PreK-8)

    (6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into student teaching
    Program involves a minimum of 150 hours of observation, assisting and full time teaching, with a minimum of 135 hours in direct instructional responsibilities in programs for moderate special needs students. This practicum is done at the PreK-8 level under a qualified cooperating teacher and college supervisor.

  
  • SPED 406 - Student Teaching Practicum: Mainstreamed Program (5-12)

    (6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into student teaching
    Practicum involves a minimum of 150 hours of observation, assisting and full time teaching, with a minimum of 135 hours in direct instructional responsibilities in a regular classroom in which special needs students are integrated. This practicum is done at the 5-12 level, under a qualified cooperating teacher and college supervisor.

  
  • SPED 407 - Student Teaching Practicum: Special Education Program (5-12)

    (6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into student teaching
    Practicum involves a minimum of 150 hours of observation, assisting, and full time teaching, with a minimum of 135 hours in direct instructional responsibilities in a program for moderate special needs students. This practicum is done at the 5-12 level, under a qualified cooperating teacher and college supervisor.

  
  • SPED 408 - Practicum Seminar: Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) Endorsement Course

    (3 credits)
    Corequisite: SPED 431 or SPED 432 or SPED 433
    This course will introduce the major goals, principles and concepts of multicultural education with an emphasis on its impact on children, school and society. It will explore the cultural, linguistic and socioeconomic factors influencing instruction and personal interactions in schools. This course will offer concepts to assist participants to improve the learning environment and interactions that occur among children from a variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds, their parents, their school and their community. It satisfies Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education requirements for SEI endorsement.

  
  • SPED 410 - Instructional and Curricular Strategies for Learners with Intensive Special Needs I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 and SPED 203; and admission to the Professional Education Program
    This course is designed to provide knowledge relating to the curricula and instructional needs of learners with intensive special needs. Fundamental concepts of the IEP process, applicable technologies that facilitate communication, mobility, parental support, support systems and collaborative aspects will be addressed. Pre-practicum monitored, field-based experiences required.

  
  • SPED 411 - Instructional and Curricular Strategies for Learners with Intensive Special Needs II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 410 and admission to the Professional Education Program
    This course provides further development of issues addressed in SPED 410. Additionally, the course provides knowledge concerning advanced instructional and management strategies that can enhance the quality of life of individuals with intensive special needs. Fundamental concepts/strategies relating to social interactions, employability, constructive use of leisure time, managing behavior, communication interventions and medication management are addressed. Pre-practium monitored, field-based experiences are required. (CWRM – special education, severe disabilities (all levels) concentration only)

  
  • SPED 412 - Student Teaching Practicum: School Setting, ISN

    (6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into student teaching
    Practicum involves a minimum of 150 hours of observation, assisting, and full-time teaching in an educational program for individuals with intensive special needs. The practicum is done at the 3-21 level, under the supervision of a cooperating practitioner and college supervisor.

  
  • SPED 413 - Student Teaching Practicum: Alternative Setting, ISN

    (6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into student teaching
    Practicum involves a minimum of 150 hours of observation, assisting, and full-time responsibilities in an alternative program for individuals with intensive special needs. This practicum is done at the 3-21 level, under the supervision of a cooperating practitioner.

  
  • SPED 431 - Student Teaching Practicum – Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8)

    (6 or 12 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into student teaching; must be taken concurrently with SPED 408
    This practicum involves a minimum of 300 hours of teaching in a minimum of two distinct educational settings where students with moderate disabilities (PreK-8) are educated. This experience is supervised by a qualified cooperating practitioner and college supervisor.

  
  • SPED 432 - Student Teaching – Moderate Disabilities (5-12)

    (6 or 12 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into student teaching; must be taken concurrently with SPED 408
    This practicum involves a minimum of 300 hours of teaching in a minimum of two distinct educational settings where students with moderate disabilities (5-12) are educated. This experience is supervised by a qualified cooperating practitioner and college supervisor.

  
  • SPED 433 - Student Teaching – Severe Disabilities

    (6 or 12 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into student teaching; must be taken concurrently with SPED 408
    This practicum involves a minimum of 300 hours of teaching in a minimum of two distinct educational settings where students with severe disabilities are educated. This experience is supervised by a qualified cooperating practitioner and college supervisor.

  
  • SPED 460 - Topics in Special Education

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 or SPED 510 or consent of instructor
    This course is designed for students who desire to study selected topics in this field; it will allow for timely and relevant information to be explored. Topics change each semester. This course may be repeated for different topics.

  
  • SPED 485 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors and Departmental Honors students and to others by consent of the instructor
    The Honors Thesis is the culmination of a student’s work in the Honor’s Program, and may consist of either one or two semester’s pursuit of an advanced student-generated project. Students meet regularly with their thesis adviser. The thesis is read for approval by the department honors committee or its designees. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • SPED 498 - Internship in Special Education

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required and admission to the Professional Education Program
    Off-campus experiences in areas related to expanding the student’s background in special education. In-depth exposure to such areas as rehabilitation programs, sheltered workshops, day care centers, hospital and institutional programs. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

  
  • SPED 499 - Directed Study in Special Education

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department; formal application required
    Directed study is open to juniors and seniors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • SPED 501 - Professional Practices in Special Education

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 510 with a minimum grade of “B” or SPED 202 with a minimum grade of “B” or SPED 211 with a minimum grade of “B” or consent of the graduate program coordinator
    This course will develop the professional skills of teachers of students with moderate special education needs in the areas of Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development, Massachusetts curriculum frameworks, existing state and federal laws, working in inclusion settings, collaborating with general educators, supervising paraprofessionals and working with parents and community agencies. Field experiences will be included.

  
  • SPED 502 - Research

    (3 or 6 credits)
    Original research undertaken by the graduate students in their field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • SPED 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the College of Graduate Studies section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • SPED 504 - Applied Curriculum Development for Learners with Special Needs: PreK-8

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 with a minimum grade of “B” or SPED 211 with a minimum grade of “B” or SPED 510 with a minimum grade of “B” or consent of program coordinator; and successful completion of all MTEL® requirements for initial licensure in moderate disabilities, PreK-8
    This course will cover alternative strategies, techniques and materials to promote successful learning of the learner with special needs at the PreK-8 level. Emphasis will be on the creation of curriculum using evidenced-based practice. The focus of curriculum and instruction will be in math, language arts and content area subjects stressing Progress Monitoring using Curriculum-Based Assessment. Alternative Assessment will also be examined. Field experiences will be included.

  
  • SPED 505 - Applied Curriculum Development for Learners with Special Needs: 5-12

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 with a minimum grade of “B” or SPED 211 with a minimum grade of “B” or SPED 510 with a minimum grade of “B” or consent of program coordinator; and successful completion of all MTEL® requirements for initial licensure in moderate disabilities, 5-12
    This course will cover alternative strategies, techniques and materials to promote successful learning of the learner with special needs at the 5-12 level. Emphasis will be on the creation of curriculum using evidenced-based practices in math, language arts and content area subjects for middle school and secondary learners, using progress monitoring in conjunction with Curriculum-Based Assessment. Transition planning and Alternative Assessment will also be examined. Field experiences will be included.

  
  • SPED 508 - Strategies for Diversity: Sheltered English Immersion Endorsement Course

    (3 credits)
    This course will provide students with techniques and strategies of curriculum design to meet the needs of a diverse student body, inclusive of Sheltered English Immersion (SEI). It will investigate the many levels of culture defined within the macroculture of U.S. society, and federal and Massachusetts laws and regulations as to that instruction. In this course, students will be instructed as to how to effectively demonstrate knowledge of methods, resources and materials for an inclusive classroom. Additionally, the course meets the requirements for SEI endorsement from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

  
  • SPED 509 - Teaching Reading to Learners with Disabilities

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 with a minimum grade of “B” or SPED 510 with a minimum grade of “B”
    This course will investigate the etiology of reading disabilities: physical, cultural and environmental. The Literacy Continuum and specific language programs will be analyzed. Effective commercially available reading programs and research-based instructional strategies that are useful for teaching students with reading disabilities will be emphasized. Field-based experience may be required.

  
  • SPED 510 - Exceptional Children in the Schools

    (3 credits)
    This course will provide an orientation to the characteristics, levels of severity, definitions, and classroom accommodations and modifications for individuals with exceptional learning needs. Included is an exploration of the roles of professional organizations and service providers, and the different professionals within the school system as related to special education. Emphasis will be on legal requirements and assessment procedures underlying individualized education programs, and an understanding of instructional strategies, remedial methods and curriculum materials utilized for individuals with exceptional learning needs in both inclusive and segregated settings. Field-based experience is required.

  
  • SPED 512 - Organization and Administration of Special Education

    (3 credits)
    A comprehensive study of the psychological diagnosis, the personnel, the curriculum, the facilities, and the pupil services in an effective special education program. Introductory background information in special education is beneficial to succeed in this course.

  
  • SPED 517 - Language Skills for Special Needs Learners

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Master’s Degree Program in Special Education
    This course will cover classroom approaches and strategies for the diagnosis and analysis of language and related learning dysfunctions. Emphasis will be on the development of a total language curriculum appropriate for utilization within special education and mainstream programs.

  
  • SPED 518 - Reading Strategies in Special Education

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 509 with a minimum grade of “B”
    This course will cover the areas of research diagnosis and instructional alternatives for students who need special education reading instruction. Participants will explore a variety of diagnostic tools as well as specific direct instruction models/programs utilized in special education. Skills in the area of explicit teaching approaches will be analyzed as they apply to the reading in the literacy/language arts class as well as to reading in content areas. A field-based experience allows students to incorporate new information into practical application.

  
  • SPED 520 - Special Topics in Special Education

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Course prerequisites may be specified depending upon the nature of the topic
    Special topics of current relevance in special education will be offered from time to time. The topic to be addressed will be announced prior to registration. May be taken more than once with the consent of the adviser.

  
  • SPED 522 - The Inclusion Classroom: Philosophy and Implementation

    (3 credits)
    This course will enable the participants to identify and apply appropriate strategies, techniques and curriculum adaptations to promote success for students with exceptional learning needs in the general education classroom. Consideration will be given to the philosophical and legal considerations for inclusion/main-streaming. Field experiences will be required.

  
  • SPED 524 - Curriculum Development for Learners with Severe Disabilities I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 with a minimum grade of “B” or SPED 211 with a minimum grade of “B” or SPED 510 with a minimum grade of “B” or consent of the graduate program coordinator
    This course will focus on current best practices in curriculum and methods for students with severe disabilities. It will focus on curriculum-based assessment, IEP development, systematic instruction in substantially separate and inclusive classrooms and community settings by emphasizing evidenced-based instructional strategies to prepare students with severe disabilities for appropriate and meaningful participation in major life activities.

  
  • SPED 525 - Curriculum Development for Learners with Severe Disabilities II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 524 with a minimum grade of “B” and successful completion of all MTEL® requirements for initial licensure in severe disabilities
    This course provides further development of issues addressed in SPED 524. The course provides knowledge concerning advanced instructional and management strategies that can enhance the quality of life of individuals with severe disabilities. Fundamental concepts/strategies relating to social interactions, employability, constructive use of leisure time, managing behavior, communication interventions, transition planning, academic curricula and medication management are addressed. Development of a full case study, including an IEP and curriculum planning, will be covered. Field-based experience is required.

  
  • SPED 527 - Early Childhood Learner with Special Needs

    (3 credits)
    This course will examine early childhood special education practices for both the inclusive and substantially separate settings. Areas of concentration will include: the history of early care for children with exceptionalities, a review of normal early childhood development, risk conditions in pre- and post-natal care, assessment of young children, procedures for referral and placement, and developmentally appropriate curriculum strategies. Special attention throughout the course will be placed on the role of families in partnership with caregivers and educators.

  
  • SPED 530 - Assessment Procedures in Special Education

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 with a minimum grade of “B”; or SPED 510 with a minimum grade of “B”; or matriculation in the master’s in special education
    This course will focus on the administration, analysis and interpretation of standardized and other assessment data, with consideration of cultural and linguistic applications. Emphasis will be on the developing of instructional programs from the data and the providing of information to professionals and parents. Field experience will be included.

  
  • SPED 550 - Seminar in Special Education

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: EDMC 530 with a minimum grade of “B” and completion of 24 semester hours in the MEd in Special Education program and consent of the graduate coordinator
    An advanced study of major theoretical and contemporary issues influencing special education. Emphasis will be on curriculum, methodology, educational theory and research aspects with classroom application. Each participant will undertake an extensive study of a significant issue in special education.

  
  • SPED 551 - Autism Spectrum Disorders

    (3 credits)
    This course examines the spectrum of disorders associated with Autism, a developmental disability affecting verbal and nonverbal communication and social interaction, generally evident before age 3, that affects a child’s performance. The characteristics of the various conditions found within the umbrella of “Autism Spectrum Disorders” will be examined and reviewed in relationship to the specific needs of children with such characteristics. Issues including the emergence of the broad range of associated disorders; trends in treatment; effective behavior management strategies; implications for parents, families, and caregivers; medical factors; early intervention techniques; speech and language difficulties; and school connections will be explored. An emphasis will be placed on techniques to effectively address the behavioral needs of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in the classroom. The importance of family involvement and strategies for teaming with parents will be emphasized throughout all discussions.

  
  • SPED 555 - Field Experience in Special Education

    (3-6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Completion of 24 credits in the MEd in Special Education program or consent of the adviser
    A field experience that offers qualified students the opportunity to gain practical off-campus experience in special education. Placements are in public and private agencies and are designed to complement the student’s study in special education; a minimum of 10 clock hours per credit is required in the field.

  
  • SPED 559 - Study Tour: Multicultural Perspectives in Special Education and Communication Disorders

    (3 credits) Cross Listed with COMD 559
    Prerequisite: Dependent on itinerary
    This is a faculty led study tour to investigate how individuals with special needs and/or communication disorders are treated educationally and socially in cultures outside the United States. This course may be repeated for different itineraries.

  
  • SPED 560 - Teaching Students with Special Needs through Direct/Explicit Instruction

    (3 credits)
    This course will provide students with information on the design of instruction for students with diverse learning needs. Procedures will be addressed which examine the relationship between the academic achievement of students and instructional design. Critical instructional design dimensions and teacher delivery include a) knowledge forms, b) the generic instructional set, and c) a principle design network. These dimensions will be applied and illustrated in the areas of language, beginning reading, mathematics, reading comprehension, expressive writing, content instruction and management.

  
  • SPED 561 - Advanced Strategies in Behavior Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 302 or SPED 575
    This course will provide advanced information relative to management strategies for the behavior and emotional problems of all learners. This course will go beyond the basics of behavior management and behavioral analysis. It will focus on interventions from all approaches including the psychodynamic, biochemical and ecological models, including commercial programs. A practical application emphasis will be highlighted.

  
  • SPED 562 - Psycho-education in the Classroom

    (3 credits)
    The primary purpose of this course is to provide students with the current knowledge and professional skills necessary for the design, implementation, monitoring and effectiveness of psycho-educational interventions with children and adolescents in school settings. Emphasis is placed upon students acquiring a functional understanding of the process associated with psycho-educational interventions in school. The course will cover intervention planning for specific academic, neurological and psychological childhood disorders.

  
  • SPED 563 - Ethical and Legal Issues in Special Education

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: SPED 202 or SPED 510 or matriculation in the Master’s Degree Program in Special Education or consent of the graduate coordinator
    This course is designed to assist professionals to develop a critical and reflective sense of how law, ethics and democratic ideals affect the contexts of teaching in general and special education. Topics include the effective educator, school law, rights and responsibilities, ethical codes, current events and best practices. Participants will analyze specific school controversies and the interpretations of legal mandates and ethical codes applications.

  
  • SPED 565 - Instructional Strategies for Students with Mathematics Learning Difficulties

    (3 credits)
    This course will cover the areas of research, assessment and instructional alternatives for students with moderate needs who need individualized or small group mathematics instruction. Participants will explore formal, informal and curriculum based assessment tools, as well as specific instructional methods for conceptual and procedural knowledge and problem-solving skills. Participants will also develop a deeper understanding of the essential mathematics skills required for students and teachers.

  
  • SPED 575 - Behavior Interventions in Special Education

    (3 credits)
    This course will focus on the background, basic principles and techniques necessary for effective development of behavior with special needs students. Emphasis will be placed on behavioral procedures that have been found effective for individual and classroom use, including the ability to systematically observe and record student behavior. Other interventions and their applications to special education settings will also be considered. Introductory background information in special education is beneficial to succeed in this course.

  
  • SPED 582 - Technology for Special Populations

    (3 credits)
    This course will develop technology skills for teachers to include students with and without disabilities in general and special education program environments. It will focus on the use of low-tech and high-tech methodologies, basic assistive technology assessment skills and augmentative communication. The handicaps. Emphasis will be placed on selecting the appropriate tool to match an identified need. Special education legal requirements for technology will be included.

  
  • SPED 583 - Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis

    (3 credits)
    This course will introduce students to basic concepts and principles of behavior analysis as they relate to children and adolescents, with an emphasis on students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and related developmental disabilities. Students will become knowledgeable about evidence-based interventions, based on basic principles of behavior, for intervening on behalf of children and adolescents in educational settings. Topics will include ethics, how to conduct Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA), reinforcement procedures to increase behavior, punishment and non-punishment procedures to decrease behavior, data collection systems, generalization, self-management techniques, and discrete trial teaching. Students will also develop their own behavior management program in a culminating project. Offered spring semester.

  
  • SPED 593 - Practicum: Severe Disabilities

    (6 or 12 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance and retention in the Professional Education Program and satisfactory completion of program requirements and consent of the Field Experience Office in the College of Education and Allied Studies
    This practicum involves a minimum of 150 hours to earn six credits or a minimum of 300 hours to earn 12 credits. Candidates will teach in the role of the licensure sought under the direction of a qualified cooperating practitioner and college supervisor. This practicum may be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Offered fall and spring semesters.

  
  • SPED 594 - Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8)

    (6 or 12 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance and retention in the Professional Education Program and satisfactory completion of program requirements and consent of the Field Experience Office in the College of Education and Allied Studies
    This practicum involves a minimum of 150 hours to earn six credits or a minimum of 300 hours to earn 12 credits. Candidates will teach in the role and at the level of licensure sought (PreK-8) under the direction of a qualified practitioner and college supervisor. This practicum may be repeated for a total of 12 credits.

  
  • SPED 595 - Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (5-12)

    (6 or 12 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance and retention in the Professional Education Program and satisfactory completion of program requirements and consent of the Field Experience Office in the College of Education and Allied Studies
    This practicum involves a minimum of 150 hours to earn six credits or a minimum of 300 hours to earn 12 credits. Candidates will teach in the role and at the level of licensure sought (5-12) under the direction of a qualified practitioner and college supervisor. This practicum may be repeated for a total of 12 credits.


Swahili

  
  • LASW 101 - Elementary Swahili I

    (3 credits)
    This introductory course will provide students with the basic structures and vocabulary of Swahili in a communicative and functional way. Students will also learn about language contact with Arabic, Portuguese, English and other languages that have influenced Swahili language and culture. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
  • LASW 102 - Elementary Swahili II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: LASW 101 or consent of instructor
    This is a second-semester introductory course in Swahili, which will continue to provide students with the basic structures and vocabulary in a communicative and functional way. Students will continue to learn about language contact with Arabic, Portuguese, English and other languages that have influenced Swahili language and culture. Offered spring semester. (CGCL; CHUM)

  
  • LASW 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
  • LASW 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  • LASW 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive, topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)


Teaching English as a Second Language

  
  • TESL 501 - Second Language Teaching and Learning

    (3 credits)
    This course will provide training to Massachusetts’ mainstream teachers who have English language learners (ELLs) in their classrooms. Participants will explore theories and models of second language acquisition (SLA). They will learn about the emotional, social and intellectual implications of the process of learning a second language while maintaining the first. Participants will analyze and compare first and second language acquisition and apply strategies related to second language learning in a cross-cultural setting. This course is designed to address the current Massachusetts curricular standards for ELLs.

  
  • TESL 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and graduate coordinator
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the College of Graduate Studies section of this catalog. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  • TESL 504 - Sheltered Content Instruction: Principles and Practices

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to equip teachers with the knowledge and skills to effectively organize and implement content area instruction appropriate for English language learners (ELLs) at different levels of English proficiency. It will focus on sheltered content instruction for a variety of proficiency levels and content areas. Course participants will use the current curricular standards for ELLs for their grade level(s) and subject area(s). Field experience may be required.

  
  • TESL 505 - Reading and Writing in the Sheltered Content Classroom

    (3 credits)
    This course will provide an introduction to methodology of content area reading and writing instruction to English language learners (ELLs). Linguistically diverse students require pedagogical approaches that address particular needs, including oral and native language proficiency. Particular attention will be placed on reading and writing instruction, and study skills in the content areas.

  
  • TESL 506 - Assessment for Equity and Inclusion of Linguistic and Cultural Differences and Exceptionalities

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to develop the knowledge and skills necessary in preparing participants to select, adapt and design assessment instruments and testing techniques reflective of both placement and instructional goals of English language learners (ELLs) in grades PreK-12. The course will include discussion of appropriate assessment procedures for evaluating culturally and linguistically different students, as well as exceptional ELLs. The course also examines current curricular standards for ELLs.

  
  • TESL 560 - Special Topics in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

    (1-3 credits)
    Special topics of current relevance in teaching English to speakers of other languages will e offered from time to time. The topics addressed will be announced prior to registration. May be taken more than once with consent of the advisor, or as a professional development course. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

  
  • TESL 595 - Practicum: Teacher of English to Speakers of Other Languages

    (3-6 credits)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance and retention in the professional education program, satisfactory completion of program requirements, consent of the Field Experience Office in the College of Education and Allied Studies, and passing scores on the MTEL® English as a Second Language
    This practicum is a supervised full-time clinical experience which spans one semester. Candidates are assigned by the College of Education and Allied Studies to an appropriate classroom that serves English Language Learners (ELLs) where they will work to develop and refine their teaching skills. Candidates will have the opportunities to observe ELL students and classrooms, design curriculum, practice effective classroom-management techniques, utilize contemporary teaching strategies and differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners. Candidates will be coached and supervised by a qualified, on-site cooperating practitioner and a faculty member form the TESOL program. Candidates must demonstrate the competencies required for initial teaching licensure via a preservice performance assessment and completion of all program requirements.


Theater Arts

  
  • THEA 110 - Theater Appreciation

    (3 credits)
    This course introduces the student to the roles of theater artists, the special nature of live theatrical performances, the art of theater as an expression of human experience and to the richness and variety of the heritage of the theater. Theater attendance is required. This course is suitable for students from a variety of majors other than theater seeking a basic knowledge of theater. Offered either semester. (CFPA)

  
  • THEA 115 - Play Production

    (3 credits)
    This course introduces the student to the processes involved in the creation of theater art. The student develops an understanding of the aesthetics and conventions of the theatrical event through observation and structured applied experience in the basic practices involved in planning and performing. Theater attendance is required. Students will be required to participate in production related duties in support of theater and dance productions throughout the semester. Theater arts majors must complete this course within the first 30 credits to receive degree credit. Offered either semester. (CFPA)

  
  • THEA 120 - Introduction to Acting

    (3 credits)
    This course is an introduction to and provides practice in the various components of stage acting through an exploration of self-awareness, vocal and physical concerns of the actor, basic acting theory, characterization, script analysis, as well as scene and monologue performances. Theater attendance is required. (Not open to students with a concentration in Theater Arts.) (CFPA)

  
  • THEA 140 - Theater Performance Practicum

    (1 credit)
    Credit is given for 60 or more hours per semester of rehearsal and performance time in a major production. Audition is required. This course may be repeated. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

  
  • THEA 147 - Musical Theatre Performance Practicum

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Students must audition to participate in the practicum.
    Credit is awarded for 60 or more hours per semester of rehearsal and performance time in a major musical theatre production. This course may be repeated five times for a maximum of six credits. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered annually.

  
  • THEA 157 - Movement for the Actor

    (3 credits)
    This course focuses on one of the most important aspects of actor training: movement for the stage, addressing techniques, styles and foundations of movement. Through solo and group exercises, as well as prepared performances, students will gain basic proficiency in proper postural alignment, centering, kinesthetic awareness and response, the variables of movement, the fundamentals and vocabulary of Laban theory and technique and the fundamentals of stage combat.

  
  • THEA 160 - Stage Makeup

    (3 credits)
    Students will learn the principles and techniques of applying stage makeup, including realistic and non-realistic, and two-dimensional and three-dimensional makeups. In addition, students will study facial anatomy, the aging process, and the principles of light and shadow as they apply to stage makeup.

  
  • THEA 162 - Costume Technology

    (3 credits)
    This course covers the principles and techniques of costume technology, including hand and machine sewing, and textile basics. Students will be introduced to pattern draping and drafting flat patterns for theatrical costumes. Offered alternate spring semesters.

  
  • THEA 170 - Technical Theater Practicum

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Credit is given for 60 or more hours per semester of technical work on a major production. One of the required four practicum credit hours must be earned in this course. Attendance at an organizational meeting is required at the beginning of each semester. This course may be repeated. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

 

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