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Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2014-2015
Bridgewater State University
   
 
  Jan 22, 2018
 
 
    
Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog 2014-2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] See drop-down menu above to access other catalogs.

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog.

The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for academic credit at the university. They are arranged in alpha-numerical sequence by course subject code. At present, the majority of the 500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours. Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening or every semester.

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson for information about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to consult “Available Course Sections” through the InfoBear link each semester to determine when specific courses are offered.

Click here to view  how to read course descriptions.

 

 

Accounting and Finance

  
  •  

    ACFI 100 - Fundamentals of Financial Reporting

    (3 credits)
    This course provides a general introduction to financial reporting issues. The topics covered will be an introduction to the basic financial statements: income statement, balance sheet and the cash statement. It will also cover internal control, ratio analysis and the financial reporting of accounts receivable, inventory, long-term assets, liabilities and stockholders’ equity.

  
  •  

    ACFI 150 - Personal Finance

    (3 credits)
    This course examines a range of alternative investments with regard to risk and liquidity. It analyzes and compares such investments as real estate, business ownership, securities and other investment types, considering the effects of taxation and inflation. (CQUR)

  
  •  

    ACFI 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
  •  

    ACFI 200 - Financial Accounting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 100 with a miminum grade of “C-” or waived
    This course will develop the student’s knowledge of both the preparation and use of financial statements as they relate to the fields of accounting and finance. Course coverage will include in-depth review of the accounting cycle, concentrating on the adjustment process and the articulation and preparation of the financial statements. The course will place emphasis on accounts receivable, inventory and cost of goods sold, property, plant and equipment, debt, equity and financial ratios and techniques to interpret the quality of earnings of publicly-held corporations. (CQUR)

  
  •  

    ACFI 240 - Principles of Accounting I

    (3 credits)
    This course involves the preparation and analysis of accounting statements. Areas covered in detail include cash, receivables, merchandise accounting, internal control, inventory valuation and corporate financial reporting. Offered either semester. (CQUR)

  
  •  

    ACFI 241 - Principles of Accounting II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 240
    This course is a continuation of Accounting I. Areas covered include operating assets, property plant and equipment, current liabilities, long term liabilities, stockholder’s equity and financial statement analysis. Offered either semester. (CQUR)

  
  •  

    ACFI 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  •  

    ACFI 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
  •  

    ACFI 305 - Business Law I

    (3 credits)
    The course is a study of the law and the judicial process including tort law, criminal law, agency law, administrative law and constitutional law. The course emphasizes the common law of contracts. Offered either semester. (CUSC)

  
  •  

    ACFI 339 - Entrepreneurial Consulting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing
    This course will provide guidance to learn the necessary content, to practice skills and bring into play the student’s knowledge as they work with a client throughout the semester to create deliverables that bring value to the client’s business. At the end of the semester, the deliverables which have been produced on a weekly basis during the semester are included in an end of semester consulting report that is written to and for the client.
     

  
  •  

    ACFI 340 - Intermediate Accounting I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 200 with a minimum grade of “C-” or ACFI 241 with a minimum grade of “C-” or waived
    This course develops an understanding of generally accepted accounting principles, the conceptual framework and accounting information systems. Financial statements, cash, temporary investments, receivables and inventories are studied in depth. Offered fall semester. (CQUR)

  
  •  

    ACFI 341 - Intermediate Accounting II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 340
    This course is a continuation of ACFI 340. Topics covered include a continuation of inventory valuation, the acquisition, use and retirement of fixed assets, intangible assets, current and long-term liabilities, retained earnings and capital stock. Offered spring semester. (CQUR)

  
  •  

    ACFI 350 - Managerial Accounting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 100 or ACFI 241
    This course is a study of management’s use of accounting information to make decisions related to planning, controlling and evaluating the organization’s operations. The behavior and management costs, as well as techniques used to evaluate and control results of operations, are discussed. Topics will include cost terminology, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, job order costing, activity-based costing, segment reporting, budgeting, standards, performance measures and variance analysis, evaluation of decentralized operations and differential analysis techniques. This course is presented from the perspective of the user of accounting information rather than the preparer of such information. Analytical problem-solving techniques and the use of electronic spreadsheets will be utilized as decision-making tools. Offered either semester. (CQUR)

  
  •  

    ACFI 385 - Managerial Finance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 100 with a minimum grade of “C-” or ACFI 241 with a minimum grade of “C-“; and ECON 210 or MATH 110; or waived
    This course provides an understanding of the finance function and the responsibilities of the financial manager. Concepts and tools for use in effective financial decision-making and problem-solving will be developed. Ratio analysis, funds, flow, forecasting, current assets management, budgeting, credit services, formation and cost of capital and impact of operating and financial leverages will be covered. Offered either semester. (CQUR)

  
  •  

    ACFI 402 - Honors Thesis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students
    In this course, one-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of the project. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits.

  
  •  

    ACFI 406 - Legal and Regulatory Processes

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 305 with a minimum grade of “C-” or waived
    This course is a study of the basic legal principles encountered in the various forms of business organizations and the study of the Uniform Commercial Code chapters on Sales, Commercial Paper, Bank Deposits and Collections and Secured Transactions. Offered spring semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 430 - Cost Accounting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 340 and ACFI 350
    Basic cost concepts and cost procedures for manufacturing enterprises are studied in this course. Job order product costing will be emphasized. Topics will include manufacturing cost-flow concepts, procedure and controls, factory and departmental burden rates and inventory-costing methods. Offered spring semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 445 - Auditing

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 341; or may be taken concurrently with ACFI 341 with consent of instructor
    The qualifications and professional code of conduct of the auditor are discussed in this course. Attention will be focused upon auditing procedures, including the preparation of audit working papers and other steps required in the course of an audit. Offered spring semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 455 - International Finance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 385
    This course surveys the financial management of multinational corporations. After reviewing foreign exchange rate determinations, it then covers such timely topics as exchange risks, hedging, interest rate arbitrage, insurance and guarantee programs and international capital markets. Analysis is made of multinational capital budgeting techniques, the cost of capital and working capital management in a multinational corporate setting. Offered spring semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 460 - Advanced Accounting I

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 341
    This course covers accounting for investments, business combinations, segmental reporting of business entities and not-for-profit and government accounting. Offered fall semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 465 - Options and Futures Markets

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 490
    This course familiarizes the student with two little-known but potentially titanic markets in the securities industry. Both options and futures are the wave of things to come. The course begins with a historical account of the origins of the two markets and then an examination of the mechanisms of both markets. Much time is spent on hedging techniques and on the application of futures contracts to the food industries and to banking and life insurance. Offered spring semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 466 - Federal Taxation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 340 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course provides a background in Federal Income Tax Law and the regulations of the Treasury Department. Primarily, it deals with the basic philosophy of taxation, taxable income, allowable deductions and gains and losses in sales and exchanges of property for the individual taxpayer. The development of the ability to utilize various references in dealing with tax problems will be emphasized. Tax planning will be discussed. Offered fall semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 467 - Advanced Taxation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 466 with a minimum grade of “C-“
    This course examines federal income tax law and regulations applicable to partnerships, corporations and fiduciaries in greater depth. The course also covers federal gift and estate tax principles, reorganizations, personal holding companies and the accumulated earnings tax. Tax planning, including timing of transactions, appropriate forms of transactions, election of methods when alternative methods are made available under the law and other lawful means to minimize the impact of taxation will be emphasized. Procedures in the settlement of tax controversies are also included.

  
  •  

    ACFI 470 - Financial Information Systems and Control

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 200 or ACFI 241; and COMP 105
    This course integrates business processes and procedures as they relate to an organization’s total information system. Students will study the design and implementation of information systems and the controls required to maintain the integrity of business information. Topics will include information systems, enterprise systems, e-Business systems, design of flowcharts, data flow diagrams, database management, internal control, computerized financial reporting and the impact of financial reporting on various elements of the organization. The purchase decision for hardware and software and exposure to various reporting packages will also be covered.

  
  •  

    ACFI 476 - Insurance and Risk Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 200 or ACFI 241; and ACFI 385
    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the fundamental concepts of risk management in the areas of employee benefit programs, property damage and liability exposures and other business needs for insurance. The course will also provide an overview of the risk-bearing industry, its function and importance and its relevance in today’s business markets. Emphasis will be placed on the insurance contracts themselves and the rating plans available. Offered fall semester. May be completed for graduate level credit.

  
  •  

    ACFI 480 - Special Topics in Accounting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: The course prerequisite may be specified depending upon the nature of the topic
    In this course, special topics of current relevance in accounting will be offered from time to time. The topic to be addressed will be announced in preregistration publications. This course may be taken more than once with consent of the department chairperson.

  
  •  

    ACFI 481 - Special Topics in Finance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: The course prerequisite may be specified depending upon the nature of the topic
    In this course, special topics of current relevance in finance will be offered from time to time. The topic to be addressed will be announced prior to registration. This course may be taken more than once with consent of the department chairperson.

  
  •  

    ACFI 485 - Capital Budgeting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 200 or ACFI 241; and ACFI 385
    This course explores the decision processes involved in the securing of long-term physical corporate assets, or in committed long-term intangible assets, including spreadsheet analysis of cash flows, tax implications, decision-making criteria, risk analysis and the computation of cost of capital. Offered spring semester. May be completed for graduate level credit.

  
  •  

    ACFI 486 - Real Estate Investment and Finance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 200 or ACFI 241; and ACFI 385
    This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the subject of real estate finance, including such topics as valuation and appraisal, market analysis, mortgages, inflation effect on real estate markets, taxes and legal considerations. This course will emphasize the fundamental theories that lead to current practice in today’s market conditions and is designed for those finance majors interested in pursuing careers in real estate management, as well as those interested in broadening their understanding of this investment option. Offered fall semester. May be completed for graduate level credit.

  
  •  

    ACFI 490 - Investments

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 200 or ACFI 241; and ACFI 385
    This course provides an understanding of the methods and techniques utilized in analyzing various securities for investment purposes. The importance of the business cycle, economy and regulation will also be addressed. Offered fall semester. May be completed for graduate level credit.

  
  •  

    ACFI 491 - Mutual Funds Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 385 or ACFI 505
    This course is an in-depth study of the mutual fund industry. A study of mutual funds involves an understanding of the investment process, fund management, promotion and pricing strategies. This course covers the history, the current players and the future challenges of the mutual fund industry. May be completed for graduate level credit.

  
  •  

    ACFI 492 - Advanced Financial Reporting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 341
    This course is a continuation of ACFI 341. Topics covered include revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions, leases and financial reporting. Financial reporting will focus on accounting changes, disclosure requirements and the statement of cash flows. Offered fall semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 498 - Internship in Accounting

    (3-15 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson; formal application required
    This course is a non-classroom experience designed for a limited number of junior and senior majors to complement their academic preparation. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 499 - Directed Study in Accounting

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson; formal application required
    Directed study is open to junior and senior majors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. This course may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits. Graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis. Offered either semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 500 - Foundations of Financial and Managerial Accounting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Admitted to MBA program or consent of department
    This course provides a general introduction to financial reporting issues and managerial accounting practices to prepare students for upper-level graduate courses. Topics covered include introduction to financial statements (income statement, balance sheet and the statement of cash flows) as well as ratio analysis and selected managerial accounting topics. Material will be presented from a user-orientation perspective. Topics will be covered with an emphasis on breadth rather than depth of coverage. 

  
  •  

    ACFI 501 - Foundations of Corporate Finance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 500 and ECON 501
    The concepts of financial planning, analysis, forecasting and control are integrated within the course utilizing cases and problems. Emphasis is on financial decision making from the perspective of the business firm. Topics covered include time value of money, ratio analysis, capital budgeting, risk, cost of capital, valuation and related financial topics.

  
  •  

    ACFI 503 - Directed Study

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson; formal application required
    Directed study is designed for the graduate student who desires to study selected topics in a specific field. For details, consult the paragraph titled “Directed or Independent Study” in the “College of Graduate Studies” section of this catalog. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

  
  •  

    ACFI 506 - Business Law II

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 305
     

    This course is a study of the basic legal principles encountered in the various forms of business organizations and the study of the Uniform Commercial Code chapters on sales, commercial paper, bank deposits, and collections and secured transactions. Offered spring semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 530 - Cost Accounting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 340 and ACFI 350
    Basic cost concepts and cost procedures for manufacturing enterprises are studied in this course. Job order product costing will be emphasized. Topics will include manufacturing cost-flow concepts, procedure and controls, factory and departmental burden rates and inventory-costing methods.

  
  •  

    ACFI 545 - Auditing

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 341 with a minimum grade of “B-“, or waiver upon acceptance; and enrollment in MSA, MBA or Graduate Certificate in Accounting
    The qualifications and professional code of conduct of the auditor are discussed in this course. Attention is focused upon auditing procedures including the preparation of audit working papers and other steps required in the course of an audit. Offered spring semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 546 - Internal Audit and Control

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 341 with a minimum grade of “B-“, or waiver upon acceptance; and enrollment in MSA, MBA or Graduate Certificate in Accounting
    The course covers the internal audit profession, the professional code of conduct of the auditors, the role of internal audit in business and the practices and procedures employed in internal auditing. It includes enterprise risk management, internal control management and the models used in business.

  
  •  

    ACFI 550 - Accounting for Managerial Decision Making

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 500 with a minimum grade of “B-“, or waiver upon acceptance
    This course focuses on the study of management’s use of accounting information to make decisions related to planning, controlling and evaluating the organization’s operations. Utilizing case studies and lectures, covered topics include contemporary management accounting practices and techniques, product costing, cost behavior, cost/benefit analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis, operations budgeting, responsibility accounting, segment reporting, activity-based costing and just-in-time production systems.

  
  •  

    ACFI 551 - Financial Management

    (1.5 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 501
    This course involves the study of the techniques of financial decision making within corporations. Lectures, case studies, problem solving and readings focus on risk analysis, cost-of-capital concepts, money markets, capital markets and selected topics which promote the understanding of modern financial management.

  
  •  

    ACFI 560 - Advanced Accounting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 341 and enrollment in MSA, MBA or Graduate Certificate in Accounting
    This course covers accounting for investments, business combinations, segmental reporting of business entities and not-for-profit and government accounting. Offered fall semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 566 - Federal Income Taxation I

    (3 credits)
    This course provides a background in Federal Income Tax Law and the regulations of the Treasury Department. Primarily, it deals with the basic philosophy of taxation, taxable income, allowable deductions and gains and losses in sales and exchanges of property for the individual taxpayer. The development of the ability to utilize various references in dealing with tax problems will be emphasized. Tax planning will be discussed.

  
  •  

    ACFI 567 - Corporate Taxation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 566 with a minimum grade of “B-“, or equivalent
    This course examines federal income tax law and regulations, with emphasis on topics applicable to partnerships, corporations, “S” corporations and fiduciaries in greater depth. Federal gift and estate tax principles, liquidations and reorganizations are also covered. Tax planning and tax research are emphasized, including timing of transactions, appropriate forms of structuring transactions, election of alternative methods and other lawful means to minimize the impact of taxation.

  
  •  

    ACFI 570 - Financial Information Systems Control

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 200 or ACFI 241; and COMP 105
    This course integrates business processes and procedures as they relate to an organization’s total information system. Students will study the design and implementation of information systems and the controls required to maintain the integrity of business information. Topics will include information systems, enterprise systems, e-Business systems, design of flowcharts, data flow diagrams, database management, internal control, computerized financial reporting and the impact of financial reporting on various elements of the organization. The purchase decision for hardware and software and exposure to various reporting packages will also be covered.     

  
  •  

    ACFI 580 - Special Topics in Accounting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: The course prerequisite may be specified depending upon the nature of the topic
    In this course, special topics of current relevance in accounting will be offered from time to time. The topic to be addressed will be announced prior to registration. This course may be taken more than once with consent of the department chairperson.

  
  •  

    ACFI 581 - Special Topics in Finance

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: The course prerequisite may be specified depending upon the nature of the topic
    In this course, special topics of current relevance in finance will be offered from time to time. The topic to be addressed will be announced in preregistration publications. This course may be taken more than once with consent of the department chairperson.

  
  •  

    ACFI 592 - Advanced Financial Reporting

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 341
    Topics covered in this course include revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions, leases and financial reporting. Financial reporting will focus on accounting changes, disclosure requirements and the statement of cash flows.

  
  •  

    ACFI 593 - Financial Statement Analysis

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 385 or ACFI 505
    This course covers current techniques and applications of financial statement analysis; exposes students to the contemporary financial reporting environment and current reporting practices of companies; and analyzes real-life cases to foster an understanding of the economic and strategic information conveyed in financial reports and related disclosure issues.

  
  •  

    ACFI 595 - Accounting Seminar (Capstone)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ACFI 341 and completion of 18 credits of graduate course work
    This capstone course develops an integrated understanding of generally accepted accounting principles along with the underlying concepts of accounting conventions. Emphasis is placed on current developments, recent FASB pronouncements, and the role of the Securities Exchange Commission. Guest speakers augment student presentations and seminar discussions.


Accounting and Finance: Other Approved Courses

  
  •  

    ACFI 400 - Honors Tutorial

    (3 credits each semester)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students
    Special topics in accounting and finance will be covered in this course. Three hourly meetings weekly. Offered fall semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 401 - Honors Tutorial

    (3 credits each semester)
    Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental Honors students
    Special topics in accounting and finance will be covered in this course. Three hourly meetings weekly. Offered spring semester.

  
  •  

    ACFI 505 - Accounting and Finance for Managers

    (3 credits)
    This course presents the fundamentals of accounting and finance to graduate students who have not previously studied these subjects or who need a review of them. Credit cannot be applied toward a graduate degree program.

  
  •  

    ACFI 510 - Accounting for School Business Managers

    (3 credits)
    The intent of this course is to deepen the student’s understanding and appreciation for the role that accounting in not-for-profit/municipal settings plays in the daily running of school systems and individual schools. Accounting principles, basics and uses in the public school financing arena will be covered as well as liabilities, inventories, payroll, audits and the state school accounting systems with its year-end reports.


Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANTH 100 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    (3 credits)
    This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and methods of cultural analysis. The problems of ethnocentricity and human cultural variability in human societies of different times and places will be studied. Offered either semester. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
  •  

    ANTH 101 - Biological Anthropology

    (3 credits)
    This course covers the following areas: divisions of anthropology, theories and principles of evolution, primate and hominid evolution and behavior, origins of hominid physical and cultural development and concepts of racial variation. Offered either semester. (CSOC)

  
  •  

    ANTH 103 - Introduction to Archaeology

    (3 credits)
    This course examines research methods, systems of data recording, and analysis and reconstruction of cultural lifeways of past cultures. The conceptual bases of the study of the past are explored through material culture. Offered either semester. (Formerly ANTH 302) (CSOC)

  
  •  

    ANTH 110 - Introduction to Folklore

    (3 credits)
    This course explores the meanings and subdivisions of folklore: myth, folktale, proverb, riddles and folklife. It covers the analysis of story elements, major folklore areas and the role of folklore and folklife in society and culture. Offered either semester. (CGCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
  •  

    ANTH 111 - Myth and Culture

    (3 credits)
    This course introduces the cross-cultural approach to world mythology. Myths of our own and other cultures will be analyzed using several theoretical approaches. Myth will be examined as a fundamental human function, necessary for the well-being of cultures. Offered either semester. (CGCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
  •  

    ANTH 115 - Anthropology of Race, Class, and Gender

    (3 credits)
    This course will introduce students to how concepts of race, class, and gender have been constructed cross-culturally. Students will use cross-cultural ethnographic examples from egalitarian, ranked and stratified societies to examine how systems of social inequality based on race, class and gender are created and maintained; how these social categories are used to promote group loyalties and allegiances; and how global community building can occur across social divides of gender, social class, race, ethnicity and/or nationhood. Offered either semester. (CMCL; CSOC)

  
  •  

    ANTH 120 - First Nations: Global Indigenous People

    (3 credits)
    This course will introduce students to First Nations or indigenous people globally. Students will investigate past and contemporary native indigenous ways of life, using examples from Native North and South America, Australia, Africa and the Pacific Islands, among others. Students will investigate issues of indigenous cultural survival, the current political and economic status of indigenous communities, issues of self-determination, global human rights and pan-tribalism. Offered either semester. (CGCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 130 - Monkeys, Apes and Us

    (3 credits)
    This course will provide an introduction to variations among modern nonhuman primates – monkeys, apes and prosimians. The course will examine the social behavior of these animals, drawing links to human behavior that will allow an investigation into primate similarities and differences, and where humans are unique. The origins of cultural behavior, along with diet and morphology, will be explored within an ecological context. The nature of learned behavior, dependence on social relationships for survival, competition for resources and the importance of cultural understanding to achieve goals will be major themes. Evolutionary theory and conservation will provide much of the framework for our studies. Offered spring semester. (CSOC; CSPI beginning spring 2011)

  
  •  

    ANTH 199 - First Year Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above or who have completed ENGL 101. Students with 24 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived.
    First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for credit. (CFYS)

  
  •  

    ANTH 204 - Global Human Issues

    (3 credits)
    This interdisciplinary course treats major world problems with particular emphasis upon those faced by non-Western peoples. The interdependence between economically developed and underdeveloped parts of the world will be explored according to such themes as collective versus individual good, short-versus long-term planning and cooperation versus competition. Offered either semester. (Formerly ANTH 104) (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 206 - Native Cultures of North America

    (3 credits)
    This cross-cultural course studies the tribal cultures of the United States, Canada and Mexico. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of Native American cultural systems in their traditional settings and on the current status of Native American interaction with government policies and attitudes. Offered either semester. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
  •  

    ANTH 208 - Anthropology of Women

    (3 credits)
    This course will investigate the relative status of women cross-culturally in a range of non-Western settings, including hunter-gatherer bands, horticultural societies, peasantry, nomadic pastoralists and contemporary industrial societies. Women will be examined as they relate to economic resources, political power and authority, kin and non-kin and in religion, myth and lore. Students will analyze conceptually and through cross-cultural data what is meant by sex roles, how they vary cross-culturally and how they are negotiated and maintained. Offered either semester. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 209 - Peoples and Cultures of Africa

    (3 credits)
    A survey of the multiplicity of ways in which contemporary societies, rural and urban, arrange their ways of life in a rapidly changing Africa. Offered either semester. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 212 - Africa Through Film

    (3 credits)
    This course examines current socio-cultural, political and economic issues pertaining to Africa and its people using documentary films, video clips, ethnographies and other visual media. Emphasis will be on the use of contemporary media to address important issues pertaining to African people’s lives, such as the HIV/AIDS pandemic, poverty, social problems, community development, economic resources, genocide, conflicts and other forms of violence, climate change and politics. In this course, visual media will be used as a tool to educate students on local and global issues relevant to the African continent. Offered every other year. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    ANTH 213 - Latin American Peoples and Cultures

    (3 credits)
    This course will investigate the culture, history and development of selected Latin American regions and their contemporary relations with the United States. Mexico/Guatemala and Central and South America will be studied by means of ethnographic and cross-cultural documents of the past and present which reveal changing conditions of society, land ownership, ethnicity and political allegiance. Offered either semester. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC; CWRT beginning spring 2012

  
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    ANTH 215 - The Caribbean

    (3 credits)
    This course examines the creation of Caribbean cultures and societies over 500 years of European conquest and colonization, the impact of the slave trade, emancipation, independence movements and postcolonial state formation. The course explores everyday life in contemporary Caribbean societies considering the intersections of nationality, class, ethnicity, race, gender and religion on the formation of diverse and complex cultures. Offered fall semester. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    ANTH 216 - Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

    (3 credits)
    The Middle East was the cradle of the world’s earliest civilizations and has made immense contributions to the development of agriculture, pastoralism, urbanization and organized religion. Today it remains an extraordinarily important and volatile crossroads for world culture. The course will examine both ancient and modern cultures within this diverse region from a cross-cultural perspective. The study will include kinship patterns, social organization, political structures, subsistence strategies and belief systems. The course will pay particular attention to the role of modern peoples in shaping the world stage, both in reaction to and in harmony with the introduction of Western ideologies and economics. Offered either semester. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC; CSPI)

  
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    ANTH 224 - Anthropology of South Asia

    (3 credits)
    Anthropology of South Asia is a general introductory course that is designed for both anthropology majors and non-majors. This course introduces students to the physical geography of South Asia, and explores the various key aspects of South Asian traditional culture, social systems and transformations, including the Diaspora, and the spread of popular culture outside South Asia. (CGCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 298 - Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    ANTH 299 - Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive)

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: _ _ _ _ 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken if _ _ _ _ 298 or _ _ _ _ 299 are taken for credit.
    Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific academic area of interest and provide them with the opportunity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will improve their writing, reading, research and basic information and technology skills while building the connections between scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for credit. (CSYS)

  
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    ANTH 303 - Archaeological Field Excavation in Prehistoric Sites in New England

    (3-6 credits)
    This course provides intensive training in the practical skills of field archaeology. Direction in site survey, excavation tactics and strategy, fieldwork supervision, methods of sampling and on-site analysis is given. The course includes an introduction to laboratory work, covering topics such as cataloging, recognizing lithic materials, metric measurement and flotation of organic samples. This course may be repeated up to nine credits. Offered every summer. (Formerly ANTH 403)

  
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    ANTH 305 - Culture Change

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 103 or consent of instructor
    This course focuses on the processes of culture change, intentioned and unintentioned, internal and external. It will explore reaction strategies of cultures toward imminent change. The course concludes with a consideration of how models can be applied to producing non-destructive, non-exploitative culture change. Offered once every three years. (Formerly ANTH 205) (CGCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    ANTH 306 - Urban Anthropology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or consent of instructor
    This course will acquaint students with the anthropological study of cities and city life. Students will review recent anthropological studies of the urban environment using cross-cultural and historic data. (CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 307 - Anthropology of Religion

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or ANTH 111 or consent of instructor
    This course covers the origins and development of religion in society; myth, ritual, magic and religious specialists: Australian, African and American Indian. Offered alternate years, fall semester. (CGCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    ANTH 308 - Anthropology of Education

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or consent of instructor
    This course introduces students to anthropological approaches to analyzing and understanding learning, schools and education systems cross-culturally. Students investigate schools as agents of child socialization and enculturation; compare U.S. schools, education systems, and school cultures to learning, schools and education in other societies; and examine how educational institutions relate to other aspects of culture. Cross-cultural data include indigenous and contemporary Native North America, Africa, Japan, Germany and other settings globally. Offered alternate years. (Formerly ANTH 415) (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    ANTH 309 - Anthropology of Art

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or ANTH 110 or consent of instructor
    This course investigates the forms, functions, meanings and aesthetics of art cross-culturally. It will be critical of the modern western concept of “art for art’s sake” and discuss ways that socio-cultural, political and economic factors frame the contexts and dynamics of art production across the world. The role of artists in society and aesthetic creativity will also be examined from a cross-cultural perspective. Discussion begins with the arts of “traditional” societies drawing from examples from Africa, Oceania, Asia and the Americas. The course will then examine how these arts have been impacted by colonialism, capitalism and the emergence of new nation-states. Topics include: ethnic, tourist and national arts, culture revitalization, issues of authenticity and the emergence of a global art world with its power relations. Offered every three years. (CGCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 311 - The Emergence of Cities

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 103 plus three additional credits in Anthropology; or consent of the instructor
    This course is a study of the development of urban centers out of a Neolithic subsistence base, both in the Middle East and the New World, with some references to developments in other areas.  It will focus on the problems of urban life in antiquity, with special reference to those problems which may also be found in modern cities. Offered every third year. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 314 - Women in Myth and Lore

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or ANTH 110 or ANTH 111 or INTD 230 or consent of instructor
    This course will investigate females and the feminine in mythologies and folklore traditions cross-culturally. Native indigenous (African, Australian, South Pacific, Native American), classical (Greek, Egyptian, Roman) and Judeo- Christian mythologies will be analyzed, compared and contrasted. Students will explore mythology and story-telling traditions as they pertain to women and gender cross-culturally. Offered every other semester. (CGCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 315 - Ethnic Experience in America

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or SOCI 102 or consent of instructor
    This course considers the role of ethnic background in personal and social relationships. The varying interpretations of ethnic culture – its formation and growth in America – are examined while each student looks into his or her personal heritage and the role of tradition in contemporary life. Offered once yearly. (CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 319 - Contemporary Native Americans

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or ANTH 206 or consent of instructor
    This course will explore the problems faced by native or indigenous peoples in the United States today. It will focus on issues of land, tribal recognition, poverty, treatment by government agencies and multinational corporations and ethnic discrimination. It will also address the ongoing changes in native responses including the American Indian Movement, the revival of native spiritual life and the problem/opportunity of casino gambling. Offered alternate years. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 322 - War, Peace and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Any 100- or 200-level anthropology course or consent of instructor
    This course proceeds from the premise that while conflict of some sort is inevitable within and among human cultures, war is not. By investigating sources of conflict violence and conflict resolution strategies in a variety of cultures, the course creates an opportunity to study war, violence and conflict cross-culturally – and the possibilities of peace. Offered alternate years, spring semester. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 326 - African Ethnomedicine

    (3 credits)
    This course examines the diverse medical systems existing on the African continent and their crucial roles in alleviating suffering in the era of globalization. Topics to be addressed include African medical practices, indigenous knowledge and beliefs, and the rich pharmacopeia that people rely on to prevent and treat ill health. Students will also be introduced to other great medical traditions, such as Chinese, Indian, Islamic, Christian and Roman medicine and biomedicine including complementary and alternative medicines. Students will critically analyze the intersections of medical traditions, differential access to health care, and the effects of wealth and poverty on human well-being. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 328 - Archaeology of North America

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 103 or consent of instructor
    The development of prehistoric and proto-historic Native American cultures. Cultural dynamics of hunting-gathering and maize agriculture. Theories of the peopling of the continent will be evaluated. Offered alternate years, fall semester. (CGCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 330 - Medical Anthropology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Any 100- or 200-level anthropology course or consent of instructor
    The course concentrates on health, illness and healing in cross-cultural perspective. It will examine ways in which culture mediates ideas of physical well-being, and will be aimed at dispelling belief in the absolute truth of medical dogma, teaching students to think outside their own cultural biases. It begins with a consideration of body image in a range of different cultures and then proceeds to the varying rationales for normal function and for dysfunction. The healing process as ritual and as scientific procedure, including the theory and practice of healing in different cultures, figures into the course as does the training and outlook of healers – doctors, priests, shamans, nurses, midwives and others. Finally, the medical systems of several cultures, ancient and modern, industrialized and preindustrial, are compared. Offered alternate years. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    ANTH 331 - Power, Politics and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or consent of instructor
    This course examines political processes in state and “stateless” societies, focusing on the development of political forms in foraging, pastoral, agricultural and industrial societies, mainly in the developing world. The idea that “politics” exists as a set of practices tied to power that can be observed through anthropological methods will be addressed, along with the development of the subfield of political anthropology itself. Offered alternate years. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 332 - Practicum in Field Archaeology

    (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 103 (may be taken concurrently) or ANTH 303 or consent of instructor
    This course provides experiential training in excavation techniques, field recording, and primary cataloging and analysis of archaeological materials. This course may be repeated up to 3 credits. Offered fall semester.

  
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    ANTH 340 - Myths and Peoples of the Ancient Near East

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or ANTH 110 or ANTH 111 or ANTH 307 or consent of instructor
    This course will explore the dimensions of myth as they relate to the cultural life of the peoples of the Ancient Near East: the Egyptians, the Sumerians, the Babylonians and Assyrians, the Hittites, the Phoenicians and the Hebrews. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the context out of which the myths arose, and the ways in which they both described and conditioned the cultural realities to which they related. Offered every other year. (CGCL; CSOC; CWRT)

  
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    ANTH 355 - Anthropological Study Tour

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    This course will offer students a first-hand, supervised cross-cultural travel and study experience from an anthropological perspective. Students will participate in lectures, site visits, research and other academic experiences, including pre- and post-travel activities, as appropriate. Students will learn aspects of local society and culture, such as visual and performing arts, religious traditions, political organization, economy, subsistence activities, folklore and family life. This course may be taken twice for anthropology credit, for travel to different study tour sites. Offered annually. (CGCL; CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 390 - Anthropology Colloquium

    (1 credit)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 and ANTH 101 and ANTH 103; or consent of instructor
    This course is a participation-based colloquium. Topics will vary and focus on different issues in anthropology.

  
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    ANTH 396 - Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or consent of instructor
    Special topics of current interest in cultural anthropology will be offered occasionally. Topics will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated once for different topics. Offered every other year. (CMCL; CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 397 - Special Topics in Biological Anthropology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or consent of instructor
    Various special topics of current interest in biological anthropology will be offered occasionally. Topics will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated once for different topics. Offered every third year. (CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 398 - Special Topics in Archaeology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: ANTH 103 or consent of instructor
    Special topics of current interest in archaeology will be offered occasionally. Topics will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated once for different topics. Offered every third year. (CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 399 - Special Topics in Anthropology

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: The course prerequisite may be specified depending upon the nature of the topic.
    Various special topics of current interest in anthropology will be offered from time to time. Topics will be announced prior to registration. This course may be taken more than once for different topics, but only six credits will be counted toward the first 30 hours of the anthropology major. (CSOC)

  
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    ANTH 400 - Seminar: Anthropological Theory

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor or department chairperson
    This course is a survey of the foundations of cultural and archaeological theory, including cultural evolutionism, structuralism, American historical-particularism, British functionalism and structural-functionalism, French structuralism and current directions in American, European and Third World anthropological thought. Theories of archaeology will also be examined, including traditional evolutionary perspectives, the New Archaeology and contemporary critiques, drawing upon social systems analysis. Offered every third semester. May be taken for graduate-level credit. (CWRM)

 

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